Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Assistance team to help refocus law enforcement

 

Written by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Gary A. Witte
300th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment

Fort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionBastogneKunar Province, Afghanistan – The bunkers, sandbags and razor wire common to any police checkpoint in eastern Afghanistan attest to the daily challenges law enforcement faces here.

Yet the latest effort by International Security Assistance Forces aims to refocus the Afghan police mission back toward the public.

U.S. Army Lt. Col. David J. Goetze of Roseau, MN, commands the Kunar Security Forces Assistance Team, one of several teams now working under Task Force Bastogne.

From left, U.S. Army Capt. Thomas Whitfield of Kingstree, SC, U.S. Army Lt. Col. David J. Goetze of Roseau, MN, and U.S. Army Capt. Robert R. Reynolds of Huntsville, Ala., meet with Afghan police officers and the Watapur District sub-governor here Sept. 25th. Goetze commands the Kunar Security Forces Assistance Team, Task Force Bastogne. Officials discussed local law enforcement and how International Security Forces could help. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Gary A. Witte, 300th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

From left, U.S. Army Capt. Thomas Whitfield of Kingstree, SC, U.S. Army Lt. Col. David J. Goetze of Roseau, MN, and U.S. Army Capt. Robert R. Reynolds of Huntsville, Ala., meet with Afghan police officers and the Watapur District sub-governor here Sept. 25th. Goetze commands the Kunar Security Forces Assistance Team, Task Force Bastogne. Officials discussed local law enforcement and how International Security Forces could help. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Gary A. Witte, 300th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

“Afghan police officers are already motivated, but what my team will do is help focus their training and operations to be more community oriented,” Goetze said. “This will help the police gain the trust and respect of the people they are sworn to protect.”

Goetze and his team are partnered with the Kunar Province police chief with the goal of improving the ANP system. This task is seen as not only beneficial to Afghan civilians, but also a way of starving insurgent forces of manpower.

If a stable police force can be provided, it will keep a lot of Afghan males from joining the insurgency, Goetze said.

U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class James E. Tembrock of Elizabethtown, KY, shakes hands with an Afghan police officer during a Sept. 25th visit at the Watapur District Center in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province. Tembrock is the noncommissioned officer in charge of the Kunar Security Forces Assistance Team, Task Force Bastogne. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Gary A. Witte, 300th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)Members of his team are each assigned to a different aspect of the provincial police, ranging from logistics to intelligence, in order to help improve each section from the top.

U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class James E. Tembrock of Elizabethtown, KY, the noncommissioned officer of the team, said one of the challenges they face is clarifying the various techniques taught to Afghan officers by previous advisory teams and then going beyond those standards.

“You have to learn what was done in the past,” he said

U.S. Army Lt. Col. David J. Goetze of Roseau, MN, listens to officers during a Sept. 25th visit to Dag Afghan National Police checkpoint in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province. Goetze commands the Kunar Security Forces Assistance Team, Task Force Bastogne. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Gary A. Witte, 300th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)During a recent meeting with officers from various police checkpoints in the Watapur District, Goetze emphasized the need to concentrate on community policing rather than heavier armament.

“The Army should be fighting the bad guys, but the police should be establishing law and order,” he told the officers.

Goetze, who is now located at Forward Operating Base Fiaz with the provincial police headquarters, previously led a counterinsurgency course at Fort Leavenworth, KS, for two years.

“I’ve taught all this stuff,” he said. “Now I’m putting it into action.”


Sections

News

Topics

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments

You must be logged in to post a comment.


  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On GooglePlusVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Instagram
  • Personal Controls

    Archives