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NOAA’s GOES-13 Weather Satellite Imager and Sounder goes out of service, GOES-14 acting as Back-Up

 

Written by Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) GOES-13 weather satellite has been temporarily substituted with the back-up GOES satellite as engineers work to fix the satellite’s issues.

NOAA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-13 sits in a fixed orbit over the eastern U.S. and provides continuous coverage of weather systems over the continental U.S. and the Atlantic Ocean basin.

According to NOAA, the GOES-13 Imager went out of service since September 23rd, 2012 at 2122 UTC (5:22pm EDT), and the GOES-13 Sounder went out of service on September 23rd, 2012 at 1126 UTC (7:26am EDT).

Artist's conception of the GOES-13 satellite. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite known as GOES-13 became the official GOES-EAST satellite on April 14th, 2010. GOES-13 was moved from on-orbit storage and into active duty. (Credit: NASA)

Artist’s conception of the GOES-13 satellite. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite known as GOES-13 became the official GOES-EAST satellite on April 14th, 2010. GOES-13 was moved from on-orbit storage and into active duty. (Credit: NASA)

The last GOES-13 image occurred on September 23rd at 2045 UTC (4:45pm EDT) and showed a cold front located off the U.S. East coast.

GOES-13′s performance was inconsistent over the days leading up to the end of the data stream. GOES-15, which is NOAA’s GOES-West satellite continued to provide coverage for the US, but is unable to cover the Atlantic Ocean and the east coast.

NOAA called into operation the on-orbit spare GOES satellite, called GOES-14, to provide better coverage of the eastern U.S. and to cover most of the Atlantic Ocean. GOES-13 is still transmitting data. GOES-14 data is being relayed via GOES-13 so that users do not have to repoint antennae.

Meanwhile, engineers are working to repair the problems with the GOES-13 Imager and Sounder data.

The Imager and Sounder instruments on NOAA's GOES-13 satellite sent this image on September 23rd at 2045 UTC (4:45pm EDT). The last visible image shows a cold front located off the U.S. East coast. (Credit: NASA GOES Project)

The Imager and Sounder instruments on NOAA’s GOES-13 satellite sent this image on September 23rd at 2045 UTC (4:45pm EDT). The last visible image shows a cold front located off the U.S. East coast. (Credit: NASA GOES Project)

According to a satellite bulletin from NOAA’s Satellite and Information Service, Satellite Products and Services Division on September 25th, “GOES-13 remains in an Earth pointing nominal attitude with the Imager and Sounder in Standby modes while the September 23 anomaly is being investigated. No estimate on return to operations at this time. Cause and corrective actions are under investigation.”

NOAA’s GOES-14 satellite remains in a fixed orbit at 105 degrees West with no current plans to drift east, according to NOAA. GOES-14 data began flowing through operational GOES East data paths at 1745 UTC (1:45pm EDT) on September 24th, and the first imagery was received at 1830 UTC (2:30pm EDT) on September 24th, 2012.

NOAA manages the GOES program, establishes requirements, provides all funding and distributes environmental satellite data for the United States. NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD, procures and manages the design, development and launch of the satellites for NOAA on a cost reimbursable basis.

For more information and updated NOAA bulletins, visit:

http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/SATS/bulletins.html

For NOAA Satellite Operations bulletins, visit:

http://www.oso.noaa.gov/daily-news/index.asp

For imagery from NOAA’s GOES satellites, visit:

http://www.goes.noaa.gov/ or http://goes.gsfc.nasa.gov/


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