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American Heart Association says Driving a Tesla may not trip your Defibrillator

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Sitting in, or standing close to the charging port of a Tesla electric vehicle didn’t trigger a shock or interfere with implantable defibrillator performance, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Research team (L to R) Abdul Wase M.D. (Principal Investigator), Marina Brown R.N., Ken Shneider, Thein Aung M.D., Matt Clark, Dawn Hunt and Kimberle Evans R.N. Good Samaritan Hospital Dayton, Ohio. (Joe Carfora)

Research team (L to R) Abdul Wase M.D. (Principal Investigator), Marina Brown R.N., Ken Shneider, Thein Aung M.D., Matt Clark, Dawn Hunt and Kimberle Evans R.N. Good Samaritan Hospital Dayton, Ohio. (Joe Carfora)

Researchers examined the potential effect of electromagnetic interference while charging an electric vehicle battery at 220 Volts.

The study included 26 men and 8 women from Good Samaritan Hospital in Dayton, Ohio, average age 69, with implanted cardiac defibrillators of various types.

Adjusting the defibrillators to both their least and most sensitive settings, the devices did not sense the electromagnetic signal from the electric vehicle battery when patients sat in the driver’s seat, passenger seat, backseat or at the charging post (where the electromagnetic interference is at its highest).

These findings suggest that electric vehicles may be safe to use for individuals with cardiac defibrillators, according to the principal investigator, Abdul Wase, M.D. and his team.

Thein Tun Aung, M.D. and Abdul Wase, M.D., Good Samaritan Hospital, Dayton, Ohio.

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability.

The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke.

To learn more or to get involved, call 1.800.AHA.USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.


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