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About: Sue Freeman Culverhouse


    Sue Freeman CulverhouseAuthor of Tennessee Literary Luminaries: From Cormac McCarthy to Robert Penn Warren (The History Press, 2013) Sue Freeman Culverhouse has been a freelance writer for the past 36 years. Beginning in 1976, she published magazines articles in Americana, Historic Preservation, American Horticulturist, Flower and Garden, The Albemarle Magazine, and many others. Sue is the winner of two Virginia Press Awards in writing.

    She moved to Springfield, Tennessee in 2003 with her sculptor husband, Bill a retired attorney. Sue has one daughter,  Susan Leigh Miller who teaches poetry and creative writing at Rutgers University.

    Sue teaches music and writing at Watauga Elementary School in Ridgetop, Tennessee to approximately 500 students in kindergarten through fifth grade. She also publishes a literary magazine each year; all work in the magazine is written and illustrated by the students.

    Sue writes "Uncommon Sense," a column in the Robertson County Times, which also appears on Clarksville Online. She is the author of "Seven keys to a sucessful life", which is  available on amazon.com and pubishamerica.com; this is a self-help book for all ages.

    Web Site: http://culverhouseart.com/
    Email: cuverhouse@comcast.net



Sue Freeman Culverhouse's Articles:

    Ann Patchett, Louise Penny, Patrick Taylor are Must Read Authors for 2016

     

    Clarksville Book ReviewClarksville, TN – When you are making your resolutions for 2016, please add these three authors because you’ll be doing yourself a favor. Each is a master story teller and will enrich your intellectual life immeasurably.

    Ann Patchett, one of the owners of Parnassus Bookstore in Nashville, has written six novels, each of which has a new cast of unforgettable characters. Her novels are “The Patron Saint of Liars”, “Taft, The Magician’s Assistant”, “Bel Canto”, “Run”, and “State of Wonder”.

    Authors (L to R) Ann Patchett, Louise Penny and Patrick Taylor are must reads for 2016.

    Authors (L to R) Ann Patchett, Louise Penny and Patrick Taylor are must reads for 2016.

    «Read the rest of this article»

     

    Bluestocking, the Story of a Tennessee Family

     

    Clarksville Book ReviewClarksville, TN – There is a special kind of down-to-earth spirit that Tennesseans have that you don’t necessarily find in other parts of this country. Tennesseans aren’t about being uppity by bragging about how rich their family is or who has the biggest house.

    They are much more concerned about how you treat your neighbors and if you’re good to your own family. Tennesseans want you to tell it like it is without putting on airs.

    Bluestocking - by Bud Willis. «Read the rest of this article»

     

    Whatever Makes You Crazy, Learn to Let it Go

     

    Clarksville, TN – Okay, we all have things that make us crazy. It might be the neighbor next door, our tendency to try to control everything and everyone around us, the world situation, or just the fact that mail carrier keeps putting someone else’s mail in our mailbox.

    Whatever it is, each of us needs to have coping mechanisms to keep these annoyances from driving us nuts on a daily basis.

    Here are a few ways you can at least turn loose of these irritants for a while.

    Learn to let go of whatever is making you crazy.

    Learn to let go of whatever is making you crazy.

    «Read the rest of this article»

    Sections: Commentary | No Comments
     


    Time and the River should be on you 2016 Reading List

     

    Clarksville Book ReviewClarksville, TN – Michael Freeland, author of Blood River to Berlin, has also published Time and the River: A Memoir with photographs by his wife, Ellen. In Time and the River (Periploi Press, Nashville, Tennessee, 2010), Freeland has managed to tell not only a story of love and war but to give an intimate look at what goes on in the mind of a person who has returned from war.

    Mike Freeland, a young man who grew up in rural Kentucky (now an octogenarian), shows us what it’s like riding the rails in the Roaring Twenties with his brother Chet. Their dreams of making money and writing a novel turned out to be the illusions of young men who have yet to face the real world.

    Time and the River «Read the rest of this article»

     

    It’s time to get ready for the Next New Year’s Celebration

     

    Happy New YearClarksville, TN – No matter how you celebrated New Year’s Eve this year, you’ve already completed your rituals. Some may have been joyful and, for some, a bit painful the next morning when your head felt like it had been run over by a steam roller. Whatever went on, it’s time to move on and see how next year’s event can improve.

    A look at how people around the world celebrate New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day can be a real eye-opener.

    Happy New Year «Read the rest of this article»

    Sections: Commentary | No Comments
     

    Get Organized for the coming New Year

     

    Clarksville, TN – With the New Year upon us and it’s time to get organized, once and for all. Here are a few hints for how to change your formerly disorganized existence.

    First, forget making resolutions. You can sit down and make out a list of all the things you think you should do. Chances are, you’re not going to achieve most of them and all these resolutions are going to do is make you feel guilty for not accomplishing them.

    Instead, just do it! «Read the rest of this article»

    Sections: Commentary | No Comments
     

    Let Me Sow Light, Where There Is Darkness

     

    This is the fifth and final of a series of articles based on the prayer of St. Francis of Assisi beginning, “Lord, make me an instrument of your peace.”

    St. Francis of Assisi

    St. Francis of Assisi

    Clarksville, TN – Many small children are afraid of the dark. “Scare me! Scare me!” usually results in a story in which darkness plays a role. Amazingly, a night light can help avoid extreme fear during the night. A dimmer switch on the night light can be over time lowered until the fear is overcome.

    Somehow the idea that something sinister is lurking as soon as the lights go out is a common fear. With the number of terrifying movies and television programs that many children are being allowed to watch these days, it is amazing that many of them can even go to sleep!

    As a teacher, I am flabbergasted when the children, ages five to 11, begin to tell me that they have seen Freddy Krueger, scenes from the Texas Chainsaw Massacre, etc. The nightmares that follow lead one to believe that parental neglect in choosing appropriate entertainment can affect a child throughout life.

    «Read the rest of this article»

     


    Let Me Sow Hope, Where There Is Despair

     

    This is the fourth of a series of articles based on the prayer of St. Francis of Assisi beginning, “Lord, make me an instrument of your peace.”

    St. Francis of Assisi

    St. Francis of Assisi

    Clarksville, TN – The short days of winter can set up feelings of despair in the best of us. We long for the green leaves of spring, the flowers, the warmth that pervades the atmosphere, the lightness of spirit that comes in hearing the songs of birds and the renewal of the Earth’s beauty.

    Almost everyone at one time or another suffers from “winter blues” when you want to sleep more and eat more and wish away the cold winter months.

    For others, these short days actually set up a chemical reaction in the brain now branded SAD (seasonal affective disorder). Symptoms can begin as early as September and continue through April, but the worst days are the darkest days when one feels that he gets up in darkness and returns from work in darkness.

    Seasonal affective disorder

    Seasonal affective disorder

    «Read the rest of this article»

     

    Let Me Sow Faith, Where There Is Doubt

     

    This is the third of a series of articles based on the prayer of St. Francis of Assisi beginning, “Lord, make me an instrument of your peace.”

    St. Francis of Assisi

    St. Francis of Assisi

    Clarksville, TN – St. Francis was born in 1182. His name at birth was Giovanni Bernadone, the son of Pietro and Picca Bernadone. His father, a cloth merchant, was probably the richest man in Assisi, Italy. Giovanni was nicknamed “Francis” (“Francesco” in Italian) supposedly because of his father’s love of France where he traded a great deal.

    Francis lived the typical life of a spoiled rich young man during the time of the Troubadours. He loved to sing, wear expensive clothes, had a witty sense of humor, and was known to be the leader of frolic and good times with the young men of the town. He went to war as a soldier fighting for Assisi in 1204.

    During his days as a soldier he contracted an illness and he is reported to have had a vision that caused him to return home and to lose his lust for a worldly life. He went on a pilgrimage to Rome and begged with beggars. This strengthened in him a desire for the life of poverty and returning home to Assisi, he began preaching in the streets, giving his money to charitable causes, and rebuilding churches that had fallen into ruin.

    Jesus in the manger «Read the rest of this article»

     

    Let Me Sow Pardon, Where There Is Injury

     

    This is the second of a series of articles based on the prayer of St. Francis of Assisi beginning, “Lord, make me an instrument of your peace.”

    St. Francis of Assisi

    St. Francis of Assisi

    Clarksville, TN – It is necessary to define the words injury and pardon before talking about them.

    According to www.merriam-webster.com, an injury is “an act that damages or hurts; it is a wrong; it is a violation of another’s rights for which the law allows an action to recover damages.” For the purposes of this discussion, we’ll look not at the legal aspects of an injury but at the hurt caused by one’s actions.

    Pardon is a word in our society that has been so imbued with legal connotations that it is necessary to completely nullify for this article its legal definition: “the excusing of an offense without exacting a penalty.” We choose instead the dictionary’s definition of “the excuse or forgiveness for a fault, offense, or discourtesy.”

    «Read the rest of this article»

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