Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Aircraft

NASA tests new Boundary Layer Ingesting Propulsor Jet Engine Design

 

Written by Jan Wittry
NASA’s Glenn Research Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationCleveland, OH – Car, truck, train and aircraft manufacturers have made great strides in recent years to reduce fuel consumption, resulting in consumer savings and lower emissions. With NASA’s help, the aircraft industry is striving to increase fuel efficiency even more.

One way to do that is to create new aircraft engine designs. Engineers at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland are testing a new fan and inlet design, commonly called a propulsor, which could increase fuel efficiency by four to eight percent more than the advanced engine designs airlines are beginning to use.

YouTube Preview Image «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA Aeronautics to start Research into an array of new Experimental Aircraft

 

Written by Jim Banke
NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – History is about to repeat itself.

There have been periods of time during the past seven decades – some busier than others – when the nation’s best minds in aviation designed, built and flew a series of experimental airplanes to test the latest fanciful and practical ideas related to flight.

Short wings. Long wings. Delta-shaped wings. Forward swept wings. Scissor wings. Big tails. No tails. High speed. Low speed. Jet propulsion. Rocket propulsion. Even nuclear propulsion – although that technology was never actually flown.

The Quiet Supersonic Technology, or QueSST, concept is in the preliminary design phase and on its way to being one of NASA’s first X-planes. (NASA)

The Quiet Supersonic Technology, or QueSST, concept is in the preliminary design phase and on its way to being one of NASA’s first X-planes. (NASA)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA works to bring back Supersonic Travel

 

Written by J.D. Harrington
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – The return of supersonic passenger air travel is one step closer to reality with NASA’s award of a contract for the preliminary design of a “low boom” flight demonstration aircraft. This is the first in a series of ‘X-planes’ in NASA’s New Aviation Horizons initiative, introduced in the agency’s Fiscal Year 2017 budget.

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden announced the award at an event Monday at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Virginia.

This is an artist’s concept of a possible Low Boom Flight Demonstration Quiet Supersonic Transport (QueSST) X-plane design. The award of a preliminary design contract is the first step towards the possible return of supersonic passenger travel – but this time quieter and more affordable. (Lockheed Martin)

This is an artist’s concept of a possible Low Boom Flight Demonstration Quiet Supersonic Transport (QueSST) X-plane design. The award of a preliminary design contract is the first step towards the possible return of supersonic passenger travel – but this time quieter and more affordable. (Lockheed Martin)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 


NASA Researchers work on Fuel Additive that could reduce Jet Fuel Volatility

 

Written by Elizabeth Landau
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Airplane accidents are especially dangerous because jet fuel is highly flammable under crash conditions. On impact, jet fuel is dispersed in the air as a fine mist, which triggers a sequence of events that can lead to a fire engulfing an entire plane.

Researchers at the California Institute of Technology and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which is managed by Caltech, have been working on additives that inhibit the formation of this highly flammable mist during collisions. These additives are based on long molecules called polymers.

YouTube Preview Image «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA’s initial tests of Morphing Wing Technology a Success

 

Written by J.D. Harrington
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA researchers, working in concert with the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and FlexSys Inc., of Ann Arbor, Michigan, successfully completed initial flight tests of a new morphing wing technology that has the potential to save millions of dollars annually in fuel costs, reduce airframe weight and decrease aircraft noise during takeoffs and landings.

The test team at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California, flew 22 research flights during the past six months with experimental Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE) flight control surfaces that offer significant improvements over conventional flaps used on existing aircraft.

NASA successfully completed flight tests of a morphing wing technology. Flap angles were adjusted from -2 degrees up to 30 degrees during the six months of testing. (NASA)

NASA successfully completed flight tests of a morphing wing technology. Flap angles were adjusted from -2 degrees up to 30 degrees during the six months of testing. (NASA)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA’s Aeronautics Research benefits those flying this Holiday weekend

 

Written by Jim Banke
NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Traveling by air this holiday season, or any time of year? If so then you’ll be in the company of millions who are directly benefiting from the ongoing research performed by NASA’s aeronautical innovators now, and in the future.

During 2012, NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate continued a wide range of research projects aimed at advancing the science of flight.

NASA-developed technology is onboard nearly every commercial aircraft flying today or in use at every major airport. (Image credit: NASA)

NASA-developed technology is onboard nearly every commercial aircraft flying today or in use at every major airport. (Image credit: NASA)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

Dusk till dawn

 

Written by Spc. Tracy Weeden
101st Combat Aviation Brigade  

Fort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne Division PatchKandahar Airfield, Afghanistan – These soldiers stand by every night from dusk until dawn with 2,500 gallon fuel trucks ready to go to the flight line for hot and cold refuels.

Hot refuel means the aircraft is running, while cold refuel means the aircraft has been shut down.

“After flying a long mission, it is nice to be able to just taxi in and shutdown because we know the refuelers are on their way,” said Chief Warrant Officer 3 Joe Maynard, A Co., Task Force Shadow UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter pilot.

Spc. David P. Rubio, E Co., TF Shadow petroleum supply specialist, puts on his fire retardant gloves before checking the 2,500 gallons of fuel inside the Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck for water content and doing preventative maintenance to ensure that the night shift refuelers are able to safely conduct their mission on the flight line at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan.

Spc. David P. Rubio, E Co., TF Shadow petroleum supply specialist, puts on his fire retardant gloves before checking the 2,500 gallons of fuel inside the Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck for water content and doing preventative maintenance to ensure that the night shift refuelers are able to safely conduct their mission on the flight line at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 



  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On GooglePlusVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our Feed
  • Personal Controls

    Archives