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Topic: American Heart Association

Increasing Evidence for Taxing Sugary Drinks to Improve Heart Health according to American Heart Association

 

Nancy Brown, American Heart Association CEO, comments on evaluation of sugary drink taxes in Berkeley, California published in the American Journal of Public Health.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In 2014, Berkeley, California paved the way in our nation once again with policies that support healthy living. Berkeley was the first city in our nation to implement a tax on sugary drinks at the minimum level recommended by the American Heart Association of one penny per ounce to raise revenue for improving community health and nutrition.

Researchers have assessed the initial impact of the Berkeley tax in a new study published in the American Journal of Public Health.

Increasing Evidence for Taxing Sugary Drinks to Improve Heart Health “These early encouraging results affirm what we had believed -- the tax motivated people to drink fewer sugary drinks and more water in the first year.” Nancy Brown, American Heart Association CEO comments on increasing evidence for taxing sugary drinks to improve heart health. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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Gallstone Disease may increase Heart Disease Risk reports American Heart Association

 

Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A history of gallstone disease may increase your risk of coronary heart disease, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology.

Gallstone disease is one of the most common and costly gastrointestinal disorders in the United States. Gallstone disease and coronary heart disease have similar risk factors, including diabetes, obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and poor diet.

A history of gallstone disease was linked to a 23 percent increased risk of developing coronary heart disease. (American Heart Association)

A history of gallstone disease was linked to a 23 percent increased risk of developing coronary heart disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Anemic Adults may have a higher risk of Death after Stroke

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Anemia, a lack of red blood cells, may be linked to a higher risk of death in older adults who have had a stroke, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Brain Clot. (American Heart Association)

Brain Clot. (American Heart Association)

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Sedentary time may raise Heart Disease Risk – Sit Less, Move More says American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Being sedentary is not just a lack of exercise, it is a potentially independent risk factor for heart disease and stroke, according to a science advisory from the American Heart Association.

“Regardless of how much physical activity someone gets, prolonged sedentary time could negatively impact the health of your heart and blood vessels,” said Deborah Rohm Young, Ph.D., director of behavioral research at Kaiser Permanente Southern California in Pasadena and chair of the new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Sedentary time — even among physically active people — may be associated with an increased risk of heart disease, diabetes and more. (American Heart Association)

Sedentary time — even among physically active people — may be associated with an increased risk of heart disease, diabetes and more. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Children Score Low on Cardiovascular Health Measures

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Proactive strategies for promoting good heart health should begin at birth, yet most American children do not meet the American Heart Association’s definition of ideal childhood cardiovascular health, according to a new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

“Instead of taking a wait-and-see approach by treating disease later in adulthood, we should help children maintain the standards of ideal cardiovascular health that most children are born with,” said Julia Steinberger, M.D., M.S., lead author of the new statement, professor in pediatrics and director of pediatric cardiology at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

Most children are born with ideal cardiovascular health and promoting good heart health should begin at birth. (American Heart Association)

Most children are born with ideal cardiovascular health and promoting good heart health should begin at birth. (American Heart Association)

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Palliative Care Barriers Must be Addressed for Heart/Stroke Patients Says American Heart Association

 

New Recommendations Examine Ways to Improve Accessibility

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – A new policy statement on palliative care, issued by the American Heart Association, highlights how critical this care is to Americans with heart disease or stroke, and makes recommendations on how to address the current barriers that prevent many of these patients and their families from accessing it.

The statement points to the poor health-related quality of life patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke survivors experience as a result of deteriorating health, symptom distress and complex care regimens.

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

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For the first time in history, High Blood Pressure is more common in Lower-Income Countries according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For the first time in history, people living in low- and middle-income countries have a higher prevalence of hypertension – or high blood pressure – than people living in high-income countries, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

A 2010 data analysis involving more than 968,000 participants from 90 countries found that more than 30 percent of adults worldwide live with high blood pressure, and 75 percent of those adults live in low- and middle-income countries.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Heart Disease, Stroke Risk factors may increase in severity before Menopause

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The severity of key risk factors for heart disease, diabetes and stroke appears to increase more rapidly in the years leading up to menopause, rather than after, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The study also found that this pattern of rapidly increasing risk factors before menopause appears to be more pronounced among African-American women.

As women go through menopause, doctors and other care providers can use this “teachable moment” to emphasize the importance of diet and exercise in reducing cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

As women go through menopause, doctors and other care providers can use this “teachable moment” to emphasize the importance of diet and exercise in reducing cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association New Initiative aims to reduce repeat Heart Attacks

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Every 42 seconds someone in the U.S. has a heart attack. Just after noon on March 26th, 2016, Julie Kubala, become one of those statistics.

She’s working now to ensure she doesn’t become a different one – about 21 percent of women and 17 percent of men age 45 and older will have another heart attack within five years of their first one.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Coordinated Response cuts time to treatment for deadly Heart Attacks

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – When emergency medical services (EMS) and hospital providers worked together in a coordinated system, people suffering deadly heart attacks received life-saving treatment sooner, according to a new study in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Often considered the most deadly type of heart attack, ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, or STEMI, happens when the blood supply to the heart is completely blocked. Quickly opening the blocked artery can restore normal blood flow, minimize heart damage and save lives.

Treatment response times improved the most when patients were taken by EMS directly to hospitals that could perform the procedure to open blocked heart arteries. (American Heart Association)

Treatment response times improved the most when patients were taken by EMS directly to hospitals that could perform the procedure to open blocked heart arteries. (American Heart Association)

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