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Topic: American Heart Association

Diet Drinks possibly association with Stroke and Dementia according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Stroke Journal Report

Current Science Suggests need for more Research

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Drinking at least one artificially sweetened beverage daily was associated with almost three times the risk of developing stroke or dementia compared to those who drank artificially-sweetened beverages less than once a week, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

The authors caution that the long-term observational study was not designed or able to prove cause and effect, and only shows a trend among one group of people.

Framingham study participants who reported drinking one or more artificially sweetened beverage daily compared to less than one a week had almost three times the risk of developing either stroke or dementia.

Framingham study participants who reported drinking one or more artificially sweetened beverage daily compared to less than one a week had almost three times the risk of developing either stroke or dementia.

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Economic and Health Impact of Sugary Drink Taxes

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Nancy Brown, American Heart Association CEO, comments on evaluation of sugary drink taxes in Berkeley, California published in the PLOS Medicine.

“This study adds to the compelling evidence that simply cannot be ignored.  The residents of Berkeley, who voted for a sugary drink tax in their community, are now seeing the benefits of significantly reduced consumption of sugary drinks, significantly increased consumption of water and consumers are switching to healthier drinks.”

Increasing Evidence for Taxing Sugary Drinks to Improve Heart Health “These early encouraging results affirm what we had believed -- the tax motivated people to drink fewer sugary drinks and more water in the first year.” Nancy Brown, American Heart Association CEO comments on increasing evidence for taxing sugary drinks to improve heart health. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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Can unemployment increase stroke risk?

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Unemployment appears to increase the risk of having a stroke in middle-age Japanese men and women, and may have similar implications in the U.S, according to new research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

Unlike in the United States, in Japan, workers are part of a “life-term employment system” in which male employees devote themselves to a stable job. “If they lose that job, they are likely to be reemployed in unsatisfactory, lower positions,” said Ehab. S. Eshak, M.D., MSc., Ph.D., lead study author and visiting associate professor at Osaka University’s medical school in Japan.

While the Japanese work culture is different from the U.S. culture, researchers say the implication is that job security could help reduce stroke risk. (American Heart Association)

While the Japanese work culture is different from the U.S. culture, researchers say the implication is that job security could help reduce stroke risk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says “Bad” air may impact “Good” Cholesterol increasing Heart Disease Risk

 

Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Traffic-related air pollution may increase cardiovascular disease risk by lowering levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), commonly known as “good” cholesterol, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

Scientists have long known that air pollution increases the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis and heart failure, but are uncertain how the two are connected.

(At left), Air quality equipment monitors traffic-related air pollution on a New York City highway. (The MESA Air Study)

(At left), Air quality equipment monitors traffic-related air pollution on a New York City highway. (The MESA Air Study)

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American Heart Association wants you to check your Blood Pressure

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – As part of #CheckIt, the American Heart Association (AHA) ) – the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease –  wants people to check their own blood pressure by May 17th, World Hypertension Day, which is part of National High Blood Pressure Education Month.

Through World Hypertension Day, the American Heart Association is joining other organizations in striving to reach 25 million blood pressure checks globally (5 million in the U.S.). Also, participants are encouraged to log their action and learn about high blood pressure.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Stem Cell Patch shows early promise in treating Heart Failure

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Patching a damaged heart with a patient’s own muscle stem cells improves symptoms of heart failure, according to a Phase I clinical trial reported in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

In this new study, Japanese researchers made patches out of cells taken from the thigh muscles of patients with heart failure and surgically glued the patch onto the surface of the patients’ hearts.

In a Phase I clinical trial, heart failure patients treated with patches made from their muscle cells showed improved exercise capacity and heart function after one year. (American Heart Association)

In a Phase I clinical trial, heart failure patients treated with patches made from their muscle cells showed improved exercise capacity and heart function after one year. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Extreme Heat Exposure linked to Firefighter Heart Attacks

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Exposure to extreme heat and physical exertion during firefighting may trigger the formation of blood clots and impair blood vessel function, changes associated with increased risk of heart attack, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Cardiovascular events are the leading cause of death among firefighters and are responsible for roughly 45 percent of on-duty firefighter fatalities annually in the United States.

Exposure to extreme heat and physical exertion during firefighting may trigger the formation of blood clots and impair blood vessel function, changes associated with increased risk of heart attack. (American Heart Association)

Exposure to extreme heat and physical exertion during firefighting may trigger the formation of blood clots and impair blood vessel function, changes associated with increased risk of heart attack. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Depressed Veterans with Heart Disease face financial barriers to care

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationArlington, VA – Veterans with heart disease who are also depressed are more likely than those without depression to have trouble paying for medications and medical visits and often report delays in seeking medical care, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research 2017 Scientific Sessions.

More than 20 percent of veterans with cardiovascular disease also suffered from depression in 2013. (American Heart Association)

More than 20 percent of veterans with cardiovascular disease also suffered from depression in 2013. (American Heart Association)

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Patients who trust the Medical Profession are more likely to take their High Blood Pressure Medicine according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationArlington, VA – Patients with high blood pressure who had more trust in the medical profession were more likely to take their high blood pressure medicine than those with less trust, according to a new study presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2017.

Researchers at the University of California at Los Angeles found that patients who had higher levels of trust took their blood pressure medicine 93 percent of the time versus 82 percent of the time for those who had lower levels of trust.

Patients who had higher levels of trust took their blood pressure medicine more often than those who had lower levels of trust. (American Heart Association)

Patients who had higher levels of trust took their blood pressure medicine more often than those who had lower levels of trust. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Good Communication helps improve outcomes for Heart Patients

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationArlington, VA – Patients with hardened arteries who reported good communication with their healthcare providers were less likely to use the emergency room and more likely to comply with their treatment plans, according to a new study presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2017. 

Patients who said they communicated effectively with their healthcare providers were more likely to report the use of prescribed statin drugs and aspirin. (American Heart Association)

Patients who said they communicated effectively with their healthcare providers were more likely to report the use of prescribed statin drugs and aspirin. (American Heart Association)

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