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Topic: American Heart Association

American Heart Association says most Black Adults have High Blood Pressure before age 55

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Approximately 75 percent of black and men women are likely to develop high blood pressure by the age of 55, compared to 55 percent of white men and 40 percent of white women in the same age range, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Man checking blood pressure at office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

Man checking blood pressure at office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Multivitamins do not promote Cardiovascular Health

 

American Heart Association Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Taking multivitamin and mineral supplements does not prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiovascular death, according to a new analysis of 18 studies published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

“We meticulously evaluated the body of scientific evidence,” said study lead author Joonseok Kim, M.D., assistant professor of cardiology in the Department of Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “We found no clinical benefit of multivitamin and mineral use to prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiovascular death.”

Multivitamins and mineral supplements do not prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiovascular death. (American Heart Association)

Multivitamins and mineral supplements do not prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiovascular death. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Young Binge Drinkers may have Higher Heart Risks

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Young adults who frequently binge drink were more likely to have certain risk factors for cardiovascular disease than non-binge drinkers, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

“Compared to previous generations, the pervasiveness, intensity (number of drinks) and regularity (several times per week) of binge drinking may place today’s young adult at greater risk for more profound rates of alcohol-attributable harm,” said Mariann Piano, Ph.D., R.N., study lead author and Nancy and Hilliard Travis Chair in Nursing and Senior Associate Dean for Research at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing in Nashville, Tennessee.

Young men who reported that they repeatedly binge drink had higher systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol while young women who repeatedly binge drink had higher blood sugar levels compared to non-binge drinkers. (American Heart Association)

Young men who reported that they repeatedly binge drink had higher systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol while young women who repeatedly binge drink had higher blood sugar levels compared to non-binge drinkers. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Wearable Defibrillators may be an alternative to Surgically Implanted Device for children with certain heart rhythm disorders

 

American Heart Association Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Wearable cardioverter defibrillators – vest-like devices that deliver electric shocks to interrupt a dangerous heart rhythm – may be a safe and effective alternative to surgically implanted devices in children with ventricular heart rhythm disorders that put them at risk for sudden cardiac death, according to new research published in Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, an American Heart Association journal.

Study finds external wearable defibrillators are safe and effective in children with ventricular heart rhythm disorders that put them at risk for sudden cardiac death. The wearable devices may provide a reliable alternative to surgically implanted . (American Heart Association)

Study finds external wearable defibrillators are safe and effective in children with ventricular heart rhythm disorders that put them at risk for sudden cardiac death. The wearable devices may provide a reliable alternative to surgically implanted . (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Gene Editing Technology may improve accuracy of predicting individuals’ Heart Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Scientists may now be able to predict whether carrying a specific genetic variant increases a person’s risk for disease using gene editing and stem cell technologies, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

For the first time, the study demonstrates the unique potential of combining stem cell-based disease modeling (Induced pluripotent stem cells) and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing technology as a personalized risk-assessment platform for determining the disease-causing ability of a yet undescribed genetic variant, known as a “variant of uncertain significance” or VUS.

Gene-editing technology may help scientists discern whether genetic variations with undetermined effects are harmless or dangerous. (American Heart Association)

Gene-editing technology may help scientists discern whether genetic variations with undetermined effects are harmless or dangerous. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Studying Heart Disease after Death can help the Living

 

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Autopsy is often an overlooked source of medical insight which may be hindering advances in cardiovascular medicine, according to new research published in a special issue of the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Autopsy is a source of discovery that informs the way we think about disease systemically,” said Jeffrey E. Saffitz, M.D., Ph.D., co-editor of the special issue and chair of the department of pathology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.”

Several papers in a special issue of Circulation offer insight into how autopsy contributes to answers about the causes of sudden cardiac death, information from implantable device to improve heart function, and identifying the original cause of atherosclerosis. (American Heart Association)

Several papers in a special issue of Circulation offer insight into how autopsy contributes to answers about the causes of sudden cardiac death, information from implantable device to improve heart function, and identifying the original cause of atherosclerosis. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Stroke survivors could gain the most from new Blood Pressure Guidelines

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Treating high blood pressure in stroke survivors more aggressively, could cut deaths by one-third, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

“The potential to reduce mortality and recurrent stroke is immense, because more than half of all strokes are attributable to uncontrolled high blood pressure,” said Alain Lekoubou, M.D., M.S., study lead author and clinical instructor in neurology at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston.

If stroke survivors were treated so their blood pressures reach the new target of less than 130/80 mmHg, deaths might be cut 33 percent compared with previous guidelines with a higher target blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

If stroke survivors were treated so their blood pressures reach the new target of less than 130/80 mmHg, deaths might be cut 33 percent compared with previous guidelines with a higher target blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Limited Health Literacy is a major barrier to Heart Disease Prevention and Treatment

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Limited healthy literacy is a major barrier blocking many people from achieving good cardiovascular health or benefiting from effective treatment for heart attacks, heart failure, strokes and other cardiovascular diseases, according to a scientific statement published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Health literacy is essential to navigate the health care system, use medication effectively and improve heart-healthy behaviors. (American Heart Association)

Health literacy is essential to navigate the health care system, use medication effectively and improve heart-healthy behaviors. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Adults with High Blood Pressure face Higher Healthcare Costs

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Adults with high blood pressure face $1,920 higher healthcare costs each year compared to those without high blood pressure, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Based on the U.S. prevalence of hypertension, researchers estimate the national adjusted annual cost for the adult population with high blood pressure to be $131 billion higher compared to those without the disease.

Nationally, annual healthcare costs for the U.S. population with high blood pressure are estimated to be $131 billion higher compared to those without the disease. (American Heart Association)

Nationally, annual healthcare costs for the U.S. population with high blood pressure are estimated to be $131 billion higher compared to those without the disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Genomic Medicine may one day revolutionize Cardiovascular Care

 

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new scientific statement from the American Heart Association summarizes the state-of-the-science of genomic medicine — the study of the health effects of the molecular interactions of a person’s unique genes — for studying cardiovascular traits and disorders and for therapeutic screening.

Genomic medicine could enable doctors to make predictions about people's health, from the likelihood of developing heart disease or stroke to the severity of disease, as well as medications for treatment. (American Heart Association)

Genomic medicine could enable doctors to make predictions about people’s health, from the likelihood of developing heart disease or stroke to the severity of disease, as well as medications for treatment. (American Heart Association)

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