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Topic: American Heart Association

American Heart Association says Fish Oil Supplements may help prevent death after a Heart Attack but lack evidence of cardiovascular benefit for the general population

 

American Heart Association Science Advisory

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Omega-3 fish oil supplements prescribed by a healthcare provider may help prevent death from heart disease in patients who recently had a heart attack and may prevent death and hospitalizations in patients with heart failure, but there is a lack of scientific research to support clinical use of these supplements to prevent heart disease in the general population, according to a new science advisory from the American Heart Association.

“We cannot make a recommendation to use omega-3 fish oil supplements for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease at this time,” said David Siscovick, M.D., M.P.H., chair of the writing committee of the new science advisory published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Omega-3 fish oil supplements prescribed by a healthcare provider may be reasonable for patients who have had a heart attack. (American Heart Association)

Omega-3 fish oil supplements prescribed by a healthcare provider may be reasonable for patients who have had a heart attack. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Overweight and obese people are burdened by cardiovascular disease at younger ages

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPortland, OR – People who are overweight or obese may live as long as or less than those of healthy weight, but they experience cardiovascular disease at an earlier age and live longer burdened by the disease, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention / Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2017 Scientific Sessions.

Overweight and obese people have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease in their lifetime. (American Heart Association)

Overweight and obese people have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease in their lifetime. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Playing Pokémon Go may help people reach 10,000 daily steps goal

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPortland, OR – Playing the popular smartphone game Pokémon Go may increase people’s daily steps, especially among young adults with low physical activity levels or those who are overweight or obese, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention / Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2017 Scientific Sessions.

In Pokémon Go, a location-based augmented reality game, players move around a physical location capturing animated creatures on smartphones and other mobile devices. Pokémon Go has generated a great deal of interest since it was released in July 2016, but few studies have examined whether playing the game can increase an individual’s level of physical activity.

When guided by internet programs or mobile devices, people can become more physically active, eat better, lose a little weight and reduce tobacco and alcohol use. (American Heart Association)

When guided by internet programs or mobile devices, people can become more physically active, eat better, lose a little weight and reduce tobacco and alcohol use. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Eating in Social Settings may be greatest temptation for Dieters

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPortland, OR – For people trying to lose weight or maintain a lower body weight, the temptation to overeat is stronger when eating in a social setting, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention / Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2017 Scientific Sessions.

The 12-month study of 150 people (90 percent women) used smartphones and a custom-developed application to capture data as dieters moved through everyday life.

For people trying to lose or maintain weight, the temptation to overeat is stronger when eating in a social setting.

For people trying to lose or maintain weight, the temptation to overeat is stronger when eating in a social setting.

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American Heart Association says Pacemaker function may be impacted by Electric Appliances; Tools

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Electric and magnetic fields (EMF) generated from everyday household appliances, electrical tools and more, used in very close proximity to the body, can interfere with the ability of pacemakers to regulate patients’ heartbeats, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Electromagnetic interferences with pacemakers in everyday life can occur, however, harmful interferences are rare using vendors’ recommended device settings,” said Andreas Napp, M.D., study author and cardiologist at RWTH Aachen University Hospital in Aachen, Germany. “Dedicated device programming is an effective measure to reduce the individual risk of interference. For example, doctors can reprogram pacemakers to a lower sensitivity to reduce EMF susceptibility.” 

Electric and magnetic fields generated from everyday household appliances, electrical tools and more, used in very close proximity to the body, can interfere with the ability of pacemakers to regulate patients’ heartbeats. (American Heart Association)

Electric and magnetic fields generated from everyday household appliances, electrical tools and more, used in very close proximity to the body, can interfere with the ability of pacemakers to regulate patients’ heartbeats. (American Heart Association)

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American Stroke Association reports Psychiatric Illness may increase Stroke Risk

 

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationHouston, TX – Patients hospitalized or treated in the emergency room for depression, anxiety, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or other psychiatric disorders may have an increased risk for stroke, particularly in the 15 days following their psychiatric diagnosis, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017.

Risk of stroke was greatest within 15 days of psychiatric diagnosis, declined with time, but persists for at least a year. (American Heart Association)

Risk of stroke was greatest within 15 days of psychiatric diagnosis, declined with time, but persists for at least a year.. (American Heart Association)

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American Stroke Association says Receiving a Clot-Buster Drug before reaching the Hospital may Reduce Stroke Disability

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationHouston, TX – Stroke patients receiving clot-busting medications before arriving at the hospital have a lower risk for disability afterward, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017.

Researchers analyzed results from 658 stroke patients who were treated with tPA – a drug that dissolves blood clots. About half of the participants received the clot-busting drug at the hospital, and half received it while still in the ambulance.

The study suggests that ambulances with the personnel and equipment capable of diagnosing ischemic stroke may be worth the extra cost, due to the decrease in patient disability afterward. (American Heart Association)

The study suggests that ambulances with the personnel and equipment capable of diagnosing ischemic stroke may be worth the extra cost, due to the decrease in patient disability afterward. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Headache far more common Stroke Symptom in Children than Adults

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationHouston, TX – Children are far more likely than adults to report headache when having a stroke, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017.

“Stroke should be considered as a possible diagnosis in any child with a headache and additional symptoms of weakness or numbness (in the face, arm, or leg) or changes in walking, talking, or vision. Urgent brain imaging may be required to distinguish a migraine with aura from a stroke,” said Lori L. Billinghurst, M.D., M.Sc., lead author of the study, clinical assistant professor of neurology at the University of Pennsylvania, and apediatric neurologist at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Infographic on Pediatric Stroke. (American Stroke Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Heart risks in Middle Age Boost Dementia Risk later in Life

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationHouston, TX – People who have heart disease risks in middle age – such as diabetes, high blood pressure or smoking – are at higher risk for dementia later in life, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017.

“The health of your vascular system in midlife is really important to the health of your brain when you are older,” said Rebecca F. Gottesman, M.D., Ph.D., lead researcher and associate professor of neurology and epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

Cardiovascular disease risk factors in midle age increase dementia risk later in life. Dementia was: 41% higher in smokers; 39% higher in people with high blood pressure; 77% higher in people with diabetes. (American Heart Association)

Cardiovascular disease risk factors in midle age increase dementia risk later in life. Dementia was: 41% higher in smokers; 39% higher in people with high blood pressure; 77% higher in people with diabetes. (American Heart Association)

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Exercise can significantly improve Brain Function after Stroke according to American Heart Association

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationHouston, TXStructured exercise training can significantly improve brain function in stroke survivors, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017.

Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States, and the leading cause of long-term disability. Studies estimate that up to 85 percent of people who suffer a stroke will have cognitive impairments, including deficits in executive function, attention and working memory.

Structured physical activity training after a stroke effectively improves brain function. (American Heart Association)

Structured physical activity training after a stroke effectively improves brain function. (American Heart Association)

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