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Topic: American Heart Association

2014 Greater Nashville Heart Walk date set for October 4th

 

Leedle, Weien lead campaign; team signup now open

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – Summer means it’s Heart Walk season! In just under three months, the 2014 Greater Nashville Heart Walk will welcome 10,000+ walkers bright and early at Vanderbilt on Saturday, October 4th, 2014. It’s one of the largest fundraising walks in Tennessee.

The Heart Walk website is now open for team registration and fundraising. Teams are encouraged to sign up at  www.nashvilleheartwalk.org . Individuals can also join existing teams and set their own personal goals. There is no registration fee.

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American Heart Association survey shows Americans are unaware of how much sodium they eat

 

“I Love You Salt, But You’re Breaking My Heart” campaign encourages people to pledge to reduce sodium, to lower risk for heart problems, stroke

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – Take the pledge – to reduce your salt intake. It may save your life.

Americans eat too much salt, and most have no idea how much they are eating, according to new consumer research by the American Heart Association.

Nearly all of the 1,000 people surveyed by the American Heart Association (97 percent) either underestimated or could not estimate how much sodium they eat every day. Too much sodium in the diet can increase risk for high blood pressure, stroke, heart disease and other major health problems.

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American Heart Association says Young Hispanics often Obese, at higher risk for Heart Diseases

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Obesity is common among U.S. Hispanics  and is severe particularly among young Hispanics, according to research in the Journal of the American Heart Association (JAHA).

The first large-scale data on body mass index (BMI) and cardiovascular disease risk factors among U.S. Hispanic/Latino adult populations suggests that severe obesity may be associated with considerable excess risk for cardiovascular diseases.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

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Twenty Two leading CEOs join the American Heart Association in a Groundbreaking Initiative to Significantly shift the Culture of Health in the Workplace

 

The American Heart Association CEO Roundtable launches with new survey showing American workers overestimate their health—leading to increased risk of heart disease and other serious illness

American Heart AssociationNew York, NY – Only July 8th, Nancy Brown, CEO of the American Heart Association (AHA), Henry Kravis, Co-CEO and Co-Chairman of KKR & Co. L.P., Terry Lundgren, Chairman and CEO of Macy’s, Inc., and 19 additional CEOs from some of America’s largest companies announced the formation of the American Heart Association CEO Roundtable.

This groundbreaking initiative is designed to create a workplace culture in which healthy choices are the default choices. As part of the announcement, the AHA also released results from a new Nielsen online survey among 2,004 employees1 showing that Americans overestimate their health—putting them at greater risk for heart disease and other serious illness. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association funding new research network aimed at preventing heart disease, stroke

 

Vanderbilt one of four major institutions in network

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Four major institutions are banding together in a new research network aimed at preventing heart disease and stroke, the two leading causes of death in the world.

The Strategically Focused Prevention Research Network Centers — funded by a $15 million grant from the American Heart Association — is designed to help people live longer, healthier lives. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association launches CEO Roundtable To Significantly Shift The Culture Of Health In The Workplace

 

The American Heart Association CEO Roundtable launches with new survey showing American workers overestimate their health—leading to increased risk of heart disease and other serious illness

American Heart AssociationNew York, NY — Today, Nancy Brown, CEO of the American Heart Association (AHA), Henry Kravis, Co-CEO and Co-Chairman of KKR & Co. L.P., Terry Lundgren, Chairman and CEO of Macy’s, Inc., and 19 additional CEOs from some of America’s largest companies announced the formation of the American Heart Association CEO Roundtable. This groundbreaking initiative is designed to create a workplace culture in which healthy choices are the default choices. As part of the announcement, the AHA also released results from a new Nielsen online survey among 2,004 employees[1] showing that Americans overestimate their health—putting them at greater risk for heart disease and other serious illness.

The three co-chairs of the American Heart Association CEO Roundtable talk during a meeting of the Roundtable in July: From left: Henry Kravis, Co-CEO and Co-Chair of KKR & Co. L.P.; American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown; and Terry Lundgren, Chairman and CEO of Macy’s, Inc. (American Heart Association)

The three co-chairs of the American Heart Association CEO Roundtable talk during a meeting of the Roundtable in July: From left: Henry Kravis, Co-CEO and Co-Chair of KKR & Co. L.P.; American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown; and Terry Lundgren, Chairman and CEO of Macy’s, Inc. (American Heart Association)

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Heatstroke or stroke? American Heart Association says you should Learn the signs of each

 

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – As the mercury soars and cool water and shade becomes more precious than gold, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association asks consumers to learn the signs of heatstroke, which differ from the signs of stroke.

“While heatstroke contains the word stroke and both are potentially life-threatening medical emergencies, stroke and heatstroke are not the same condition,” said Rani Whitfield, M.D., family practitioner and American Stroke Association spokesperson. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Watching too much TV may increase risk of Early Death in Adults

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Adults who watch TV for three hours or more each day may double their risk of premature death compared to those who watch less, according to new research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Television viewing is a major sedentary behavior and there is an increasing trend toward all types of sedentary behaviors,” said Miguel Martinez-Gonzalez, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., the study’s lead author and professor and chair of the Department of Public Health at the University of Navarra in Pamplona, Spain. “Our findings are consistent with a range of previous studies where time spent watching television was linked to mortality.”

Researchers suggest adults should consider getting regular exercise, avoiding long sedentary periods and reducing TV viewing to one to two hours a day. (American Heart Association)

Researchers suggest adults should consider getting regular exercise, avoiding long sedentary periods and reducing TV viewing to one to two hours a day. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says quitting Smokeless Tobacco after Heart Attack may Extend Life Expectancy

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People who stop using smokeless tobacco after a heart attack may extend their life expectancy similar to people who stop smoking, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

“We didn’t expect to see such a strong association among those people who stopped using (smokeless tobacco),” said Gabriel Arefalk, M.D., lead researcher and cardiologist at Uppsala University Hospital in Uppsala, Sweden. “After a heart attack, no doubt smoking cessation reduces the risk of death approximately one third and is really a cornerstone of cardiac rehabilitation worldwide. For smokeless tobacco, we did not know.”

Quitting smokeless tobacco after a heart attack extends life expectancy similar to quitting smoking. (American Heart Association)

Quitting smokeless tobacco after a heart attack extends life expectancy similar to quitting smoking. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Depression linked to higher Heart Disease Death Risk in Younger Women

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women  55 and younger are twice as likely to suffer a heart attack, die or require artery-opening procedures if they’re moderately or severely depressed, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Women in this age group are also more likely to have depression, so this may be one of the ‘hidden’ risk factors that can help explain why women die at a disproportionately higher rate than men after a heart attack,” said Amit Shah, M.D., M.S.C.R., study author and assistant professor of Epidemiology at Emory University in Atlanta, GA. «Read the rest of this article»

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