Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: American Heart Association

American Heart Association says Preterm Birth leads to Smaller Kidneys, Higher Blood Pressure in Adulthood

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report Abstract 134

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – Premature birth cuts short kidney development, resulting in smaller kidney size and higher blood pressure in adulthood, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension 2016 Scientific Sessions.

“Adults born preterm may not present with the ‘classical’ risk factors for heart disease, but they are at increased risk of hypertension and insulin resistance and certainly require regular medical follow-up,” said Anne Monique Nuyt, M.D., senior author of the study and head of the division of neonatology at the Sainte-Justine University Hospital and Research Center of the University of Montreal, Canada.

Being born extremely early leads to smaller kidneys and higher blood pressure in adulthood. (American Heart Association)

Being born extremely early leads to smaller kidneys and higher blood pressure in adulthood. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports link discovered between Preterm Birth and risk of Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report Abstract 45

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – Abnormalities in a type of cell involved in blood vessel development and healing may explain why adults who were born prematurely are at increased risk of high blood pressure and other heart alterations, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension 2016 Scientific Sessions.

Researchers at the University of Montreal compared the function of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) – which help maintain healthy blood vessels – taken from 30 young adults (21-28 years old) born very preterm (less than 29 weeks gestation) and 30 young adults born at term (37 or more weeks gestation).

Blood pressure cuff on a child. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff on a child. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association Urges Federal Investment in Physical Activity Following CDC Study

 

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C.   American Heart Association President Steven Houser, Ph.D., FAHA issued the following comments today on new research, released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), that examines “Physical Inactivity Among Adults Aged 50 Years and Older”:

“Physical activity can be one of the most potent medicines for overall health. Unfortunately, not nearly enough Americans choose to take it. According to a new CDC report, nearly 28 million Americans, ages 50 and up, are physically inactive.

Kids playing on a playground. (American Heart Association)

Kids playing on a playground. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association reports Sound Therapy may balance brain signals to reduce Blood Pressure, Migraines

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report Abstracts P310, P602

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – A noninvasive neurotechnology, which uses sound to balance right- and left-side brain frequencies was associated with lowered blood pressure, improved heart rate variability, and reduced symptoms of migraine headaches, according to two small studies presented at the American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension 2016 Scientific Sessions.

The neurotechnology, called High-resolution, relational, resonance based, electroencephalic mirroring, or HIRREM® (Brain State Technologies, Scottsdale, Arizona), uses sensors placed on the scalp to measure brain electrical activity, and detect right/left imbalances, or hyperarousal, according to study author Hossam A. Shaltout, R.Ph., Ph.D., assistant professor in the Hypertension and Vascular Research Center at Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Spectrograph presenting brain electrical activity before HIRREM sessions. (Dr. Charles H. Tegeler, MD, Department of Neurology, Wake Forest School of Medicine)

Spectrograph presenting brain electrical activity before HIRREM sessions. (Dr. Charles H. Tegeler, MD, Department of Neurology, Wake Forest School of Medicine)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Lowering blood pressure’s top number could prevent 100,000-plus deaths a year according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report Abstract 241

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – More than 100,000 deaths could be prevented annually if adults with specific common risk factors for heart disease would engage in an intensive program to lower systolic blood pressure, the top number in your blood pressure reading, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension 2016 Scientific Sessions.

Researchers used the findings from the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT). which was  released in 2015.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Genetically-Modified Probiotic may one day treat Pulmonary Hypertension

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report Abstract 9

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – An oral, genetically-modified strain of the probiotic Lactobacillus was used to treat rats with high blood pressure in the lungs, which resulted in reduced blood pressure, improved heart contractility, and reduced heart wall thickness, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension 2016 Scientific Sessions.

High blood pressure in the lungs is known as pulmonary hypertension. In pulmonary hypertension, the heart must work harder to pump blood from the heart through the arteries of the lungs, which puts added strain on the heart.

An oral, genetically-modified strain of the probiotic Lactobacillus was used to treat rats with high blood pressure in the lungs, which resulted in reduced blood pressure, improved heart contractility, and reduced heart wall thickness. (American Heart Association)

An oral, genetically-modified strain of the probiotic Lactobacillus was used to treat rats with high blood pressure in the lungs, which resulted in reduced blood pressure, improved heart contractility, and reduced heart wall thickness. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Drinking alcohol daily may enlarge heart chamber; lead to atrial fibrillation according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Despite the common perception that moderate alcohol intake is good for the heart, new research suggests long-term alcohol consumption, even as little as one drink a day may enlarge the heart’s left upper chamber (atrium) and increase the risk of developing atrial fibrillation, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Daily, long-term alcohol consumption was associated with a five percent higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

Daily, long-term alcohol consumption was associated with a five percent higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association says Smoking may lead to Heart Failure by thickening the Heart Wall

 

Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Smoking is associated with thicker heart walls and reduction in the heart’s pumping ability, two factors associated with increased risk of heart failure, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging.

The study, conducted in participants of average age 75.7 and no obvious signs of cardiovascular disease, also found that higher rates of cumulative cigarette exposure — measure of how much and how long people have smoked during their lifetime — were associated with greater heart damage.

The longer and more cigarettes people smoked, the greater the damage to their hearts’ structure and function.

The longer and more cigarettes people smoked, the greater the damage to their hearts’ structure and function.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Kids need to be Protected from toxic Secondhand Smoke

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Parents and policy advocates should take a “zero tolerance” approach to exposing children to secondhand cigarette smoke, which can be responsible for lifelong cardiovascular consequences in addition to respiratory and other health issues, according to a new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

American Heart Association says Kids need to be Protected from toxic Secondhand Smoke. (American Heart Association)

American Heart Association says Kids need to be Protected from toxic Secondhand Smoke. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Exercise can help keep Medical Costs Down

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Getting recommended levels of exercise weekly may help keep down annual medical costs both for people with and without cardiovascular disease, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Although it’s well known that regular moderate exercise reduces risk of heart disease, stroke, and chronic conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure, “our findings also emphasize the favorable impact on how much you pay for healthcare,” said Khurram Nasir, M.D., M.P.H., senior author of the study and director of the Center for Healthcare Advancement & Outcomes and the High Risk Cardiovascular Disease Clinic at Baptist Health South Florida in Coral Gables.

Patients with heart disease who met weekly guidelines for moderate to vigorous exercise saved on average more than $2,500 in annual healthcare costs. (American Heart Association)

Patients with heart disease who met weekly guidelines for moderate to vigorous exercise saved on average more than $2,500 in annual healthcare costs. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Page 1 of 5312345...»

  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On GooglePlusVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our Feed
  • Personal Controls

    Archives