Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: American Heart Association

American Heart Association says Metabolic Abnormalities may increase Cardiovascular risk more in Black Women than in White Women

 

Large waistline, cholesterol disorders and other metabolic abnormalities may increase the relative risk of cardiovascular disease more among black women than among white women.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Large waistline, cholesterol disorders and other metabolic abnormalities may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease more among black women than among white women, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association.

Previous studies have focused primarily on white participants and found that obesity without a clustering of at least three metabolic disorders (metabolic syndrome) was not associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk.

Having any two of these metabolic abnormalities: high blood pressure, high triglyerides, low “good cholesterol” large waist or impaired glucose metabolism may increase the risk of heart attack and stroke 117 percent among obese black women but not obese white women. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Nashville’s Street Corner Symphony keeps the beat in new American Heart Association CPR video

 

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – A new video is capitalizing on the popularity of a cappella – and a Nashville group who’s achieved national fame – to help teach people how to perform Hands-Only CPR.

It features Nashville’s own ​Street Corner Symphony interrupting a family dinner with a classic disco song. The message is two-fold: call 911 when you see a teen or adult collapse, and push hard and fast in the center of the chest to the beat of the Bee Gees’ song “Stayin’ Alive.”

YouTube Preview Image «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association report shows Long-term Depression may Double Stroke Risk despite treatment

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Persistent depression may double the risk of stroke in adults over 50 — and stroke risk remains higher even after symptoms of depression go away, according to research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Our findings suggest that depression may increase stroke risk over the long term,” said Paola Gilsanz, Sc.D., study lead author and ‎Yerby Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, Mass.

Long-term depression may double the risk of stroke for middle-aged adults.

Long-term depression may double the risk of stroke for middle-aged adults.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association announces Strokes for Stroke art show to feature original pieces created by and for those affected by Stroke

 

May is American Stroke Month

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – This month, the American Heart Association is bringing attention to stroke in a creative, colorful way.

Strokes for Stroke is a unique local art show featuring original pieces created by –  and for – those affected by stroke. Many of the pieces to be displayed were created by stroke survivors, while other pieces have been created and donated by artists in honor of someone they know who’s had a stroke.

Strokes for Stroke Art Show Thursday, May 14th

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Most Americans don’t know common stroke signs, but an app can help

 

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – If you’re like most Americans, you don’t know the signs of stroke.

Only 8 percent of those recently surveyed in the American Stroke Association/Ad Council Stroke Awareness Continuous Tracking Study could identify each letter in F.A.S.T., an acronym of the most common stroke warning signs.

Spot a Stroke F.A.S.T. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association announces Dr. Holly Atkinson to keynote at Go Red For Women Wellness Expo and Luncheon

 

Go Red for Women - American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – Well-known media personality Dr. Holly Atkinson, senior on-air medical correspondent and chief medical editor of HealthiNation, a digital consumer health video network, will be the keynote speaker at the Go Red For Women Wellness Expo and Luncheon on April 29th.

The annual health expo and luncheon takes place from 10:00am to 1:00pm at the Music City Center, and will demonstrate tips on healthy living to more than 400 female guests while raising funds for the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement supporting women-focused research and education fighting their No. 1 killer, heart disease.

Dr. Holly Atkinson named keynote speaker for American Heart Association's Go Red For Women Wellness Expo and Luncheon

Dr. Holly Atkinson named keynote speaker for American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women Wellness Expo and Luncheon

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Events | No Comments
 

American Heart Association, two other major organizations issue new recommendations for treating patients with High Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Disease

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new scientific statement issued jointly by three medical organizations and published in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension, addresses how low to aim when treating patients with high blood pressure who also have vascular diseases.

The document provides an up-to-date summary on treating hypertension in patients who have both high blood pressure and have had a stroke, heart attack or some other forms of heart disease, said Elliott Antman, M.D., President of the American Heart Association and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.

Blood pressure monitoring. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure monitoring. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association says Smoking in front of your Kids may increase their risk of Heart Disease as Adults

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Kids exposed to their parents’ smoking may have a higher risk of developing heart disease in adulthood than those whose parents didn’t smoke, according to research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

The study’s results add to the growing evidence that exposure to smoking from parents has a lasting effect on children’s cardiovascular health in adulthood.

Researchers stressed that parents should not smoke if they want to provide the best long-term cardiovascular health for their children.

Researchers stressed that parents should not smoke if they want to provide the best long-term cardiovascular health for their children.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Middle Tennessee is getting ready to walk #18Kminutes for National Walking Day

 

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – We lose nearly 18,000 Tennesseans each year from heart diseases and stroke. Yet these are largely preventable through healthy living behaviors – like walking.

So let’s take steps to turn that 18,000 around.

This Wednesday, April 1st, is National Walking Day. The American Heart Association is asking Middle Tennessee to walk a total of 18,000 minutes. Everyone is asked to take a heart-healthy walk wherever they are, and to “donate” their minutes walked toward the goal.

National Walking Day «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Events | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says ‘Perfect storm’ of Stress, Depression may raise risk of Death, Heart Attack for Heart Patients

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The combination of stress and heavy depression can significantly increase heart patient’s risk of death or heart attack, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

The study examined the effect of high stress levels and high depressive symptoms among nearly 5,000 heart patients.

Researchers say behavioral interventions may be needed to help heart patients manage both stress and depression. (American Heart Association)

Researchers say behavioral interventions may be needed to help heart patients manage both stress and depression. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Page 1 of 3712345...»

Clarksville's Roxy Regional Theatre

Personal Controls

Archives