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Topic: American Heart Association

American Heart Association reports Men may face high lifetime risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – About one in every nine men will experience sudden cardiac death, most before age 70, as well as about one in 30 women, according to research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Sudden cardiac death claims up to 450,000 American lives each year, according to the study and most commonly occurs in people with no prior symptoms of cardiovascular disease.

One in nine men may be at higher risk of premature death due to sudden cardiac death – usually with no warning. One in 30 women may face the same risk. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Genetically inherited High Cholesterol increases long-term risks of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Patients who experience high cholesterol due to an inherited genetic disorder from one of their parents—heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia— are much more likely than those with average cholesterol levels to have diseases caused by hardening of the arteries, including an accelerated onset of coronary heart disease by up to 30 years, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

The inherited form of high cholesterol—familial hypercholesterolemia—is a genetic disorder that is passed down through families.

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Video may help Heart Failure Patients choose level of End-Of-Life Care

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A picture may be worth a thousand words. Patients with advanced heart failure who watched a short video depicting different levels of end-of-life care were more likely to choose comfort care over invasive care that could prolong their life, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Performance, Quality Measures Updated for Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

 

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association today released updated clinical performance and quality measures for treating adult patients with atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter. This document updates the previous measure set that was released in 2008 and for which implementation notes were issued in 2011.

“Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in the United States,” said Paul A. Heidenreich, M.D., M.S., FACC, professor and vice-chair for clinical, quality and analytics in the department of medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the chair of the writing committee. “This condition impacts between 2.7 million and 6.1 million American adults, and this number is expected to double by 2050. Updating the measure set was a priority for the ACC and AHA.”

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Prehypertension during Pregnancy could lead to Cardiovascular Risks

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Pregnant women who experience persistent blood pressure elevations in the upper ranges of normal may be at high risk of developing metabolic syndrome and increased cardiovascular risk after giving birth, according to research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Pregnant women who experience even subtle blood pressure elevations in the upper ranges of what is considered “normal” blood pressure appear more likely to develop metabolic syndrome after giving birth. (American Heart Association)

Pregnant women who experience even subtle blood pressure elevations in the upper ranges of what is considered “normal” blood pressure appear more likely to develop metabolic syndrome after giving birth. (American Heart Association)

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Digital strategies show promise for Emergency Heart and Stroke Care according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Mobile devices, social media, visual media and crowdsourcing have the potential to improve emergency care for cardiac arrests, heart attacks and strokes, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association.

The new statement, published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, reviewed scientific studies to evaluate current knowledge on the effectiveness digital strategies at improving emergency cardiac and stroke care.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Eliminating Blood Test may increase availability of Donor Hearts

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A blood test that leads to the rejection of donor hearts may be unnecessary in predicting whether a heart transplant will succeed or fail, according to new research in Circulation: Heart Failure, an American Heart Association journal.

“Heart transplantation is an incredible therapy for patients with end-stage heart failure, but there are only 2,000-2,400 transplants each year. A lot of focus has been on finding ways to sign up more people as organ donors, but there is also a problem in that only an average of one in three donor hearts are placed,” said Snehal R. Patel, M.D., senior author of the study and assistant professor of medicine at Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, in the Bronx, New York.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Sleep disorders may predict heart events after angioplasty

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People who have had percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), also known as angioplasty, for acute coronary syndrome could be at higher risk of death, heart failure, heart attack and stroke if they have sleep-disordered breathing, such as sleep apnea, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Acute coronary syndrome, is an umbrella term for conditions in which the blood supplied to the heart is suddenly blocked.

Sleeping woman. (American Heart Association)

Sleeping woman. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Household Air Pollution linked to Higher Risk of Heart Attacks, Death

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Long-term exposure to household air pollution from lighting, cooking or heating with fuels, such as kerosene or diesel, may increase the risk of heart attacks and death, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Burning cleaner fuels, such as natural gas, was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular deaths.

According to the World Health Organization, one-half of the world’s population lives in poverty and burns fuels for lighting, cooking and heating purposes.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Eating more Whole Grains linked with Lower Risk of Death

 

American Heart Association Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Eating at least three servings of whole grains every day could lower your risk of death, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Although dietary guidelines around the world have included whole grains as an essential component of healthy eating patterns, people aren’t eating enough, according to the analysis. In the United States average consumption remains below one serving a day, despite the long-time recommendation of three servings a day.

Eating at least three servings of whole grains a day was associated with lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer and all causes in an analysis of nutrition studies. (American Heart Association)

Eating at least three servings of whole grains a day was associated with lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer and all causes in an analysis of nutrition studies. (American Heart Association)

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