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Topic: American Heart Association

American Heart Association seeks a Cure for Coronary Heart Disease And Its Devastating Consequences

 

Applications open to find a single Leader and Team for $75M bold new research approach

AAADallas, TX – The American Heart Association (AHA) and Verily, (formerly Google Life Sciences)has announced that AstraZeneca (AZ) has joined them in a bold new approach to find a cure for coronary heart disease and improve cardiovascular health. With a commitment of $75 million dollars over at least a five year period, the three organizations have initiated the single largest research project funding one leader and team in the fight to cure coronary heart disease.

The application period for this new research enterprise officially opened January 14th at: www.onebraveidea.com.

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American Heart Association reports Sugar-Sweetened Drinks linked to increased Visceral Fat

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages every day was associated with an increase in a particular type of body fat that may affect diabetes and heart disease risk, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Data from the Framingham Heart Study — federally supported, ongoing research that has advanced the understanding of cardiovascular disease — showed that among middle-aged adults, there was a direct correlation between greater sweetened beverage consumption and increased visceral fat.

Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages every day was associated with an increase in a particular type of body fat that may affect diabetes and heart disease risk.. (American Heart Association)

Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages every day was associated with an increase in a particular type of body fat that may affect diabetes and heart disease risk.. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association shows even small reductions in Kidney function may damage Heart, Blood Vessels

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Even small reductions in kidney function are associated with heart and blood vessel damage, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

“Even in very healthy people, a small reduction in kidney function from normal to just a bit below normal was associated with an increase in the mass of the left ventricle, a change that makes the heart stiffer and impairs its ability to contract,” said Jonathan Townend, M.D., senior author of the paper and professor of cardiology at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham in Edgbaston, United Kingdom.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association Says New Dietary Guidelines Will Help Establish a Healthier Roadmap for Americans

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The American Heart Association (AHA) applauds the Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Agriculture (USDA) on the release of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

“The new federal dietary guidelines give Americans more flexibility in their diets without sacrificing their health. By providing a valuable source of nutrition information, the standards are part of a roadmap to help build a ‘culture of health’ in America. This healthier culture will help reduce our risk for heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world,” said Mark Creager, M.D., president of the American Heart Association.

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American Heart Association Comments on Sugary Drink Taxes in Mexico

 

The American Heart Association comments on first-year evaluation of implementation of Mexico’s sugar-sweetened beverage tax in 2014.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In 2014, Mexico implemented a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages as a step toward reversing the twin epidemics of diabetes and obesity.

A study examining the first-year impact on beverage volume sales in Mexico after tax implementation shows that a tax of one peso per liter decreased the volume of sugary drinks purchased by a significant amount (6% monthly average), while also increasing the volume of healthier drinks purchased (4% monthly average), specifically bottled water.

Sugar-sweetened drinks associated with heart disease and other chronic diseases such as obesity and diabetes.

Sugar-sweetened drinks associated with heart disease and other chronic diseases such as obesity and diabetes.

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American Heart Association says New CDC Report Amplifies Concerns About E-cigarette Ads and Youth

 

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. –  American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown issued the following comments on a new Vital Signs report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

The report, which analyzed data from the 2014 National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS), found that seven in 10 middle and high school students – more than 18 million youths – see e-cigarette ads from one or more media sources:

Unlike tobacco products, e-cigarettes are not age-restricted. Use among youth approximately doubled between 2011 and 2012, by which time an estimated 1.78 million students in grades 6–12 had tried the devices, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Unlike tobacco products, e-cigarettes are not age-restricted. Use among youth approximately doubled between 2011 and 2012, by which time an estimated 1.78 million students in grades 6–12 had tried the devices, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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American Heart Association announces 2015 Top Heart Disease, Stroke Research

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association is featuring the top advances in heart disease and stroke research in 2015 in a series of stories (listed below) on Heart.org.

Each story was selected by a panel of the association’s science staff and volunteers. The organization has compiled an annual list of the major advances in heart disease and stroke research each year since 1996.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association gives Seven Healthy Heart measures may reduce Heart Failure Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People scoring well on the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 checklist for a healthy heart are less likely to develop heart failure, a condition that reduces blood and oxygen flow to the body, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Heart Failure.

Life’s Simple 7 encompasses seven measures that people can use to rate their heart health and take steps to improve it. The measures are: manage blood pressure, control cholesterol, reduce blood sugar, get physically active, eat better, lose weight and stop smoking.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says new reversible drug shows early promise in preventing dangerous Clots

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new drug that protects against dangerous blood clots in patients undergoing procedures such as angioplasty to restore blood flow through the coronary arteries, appears safe, fast, and the effects are uniquely reversible, according to early testing described in the American Heart Association journal: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology.

Antiplatelet drugs currently available to patients carry an increased risk of bleeding.

A uniquely acting antiplatelet agent, PZ-128, appears to be safe and fast for preventing blood clots and its effects are reversible, reducing risk for excessive bleeding. (American Heart Association)

A uniquely acting antiplatelet agent, PZ-128, appears to be safe and fast for preventing blood clots and its effects are reversible, reducing risk for excessive bleeding. (American Heart Association)

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New statistics from American Heart Association shows one of every three U.S. Deaths caused by Cardiovascular Disease

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – One of every three deaths in the U.S. in 2013 were from heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases, while heart disease and stroke were the No. 1 and No. 2 killers worldwide, according to American Heart Association’s 2016 Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics Update. 

Produced since 1958, the update is created from the most-recent data available and compiled by the AHA, the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other government sources.

Brain Clot. (American Heart Association)

Brain Clot. (American Heart Association)

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