Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: American Heart Association

American Heart Association says Inherited Taste Perceptions may explain why some people eat too much Salt

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Inherited differences in taste perceptions may help explain why some people eat more salt than recommended, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

“Genetic factors that influence taste aren’t necessarily obvious to people, but they can impact heart health by influencing the foods they select,” said lead author Jennifer Smith, B.S.N., R.N., a Ph.D. student at the University of Kentucky College of Nursing.

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says New Peripheral Artery Disease Guidelines emphasize Medical Therapy and Structured Exercise

 

American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Clinical Practice Guideline

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – New guidelines for the treatment of peripheral artery disease (PAD), include recommendations on the use of antiplatelet therapy to reduce the risk of blood clots and statin drugs to lower cholesterol and advise PAD patients to participate in a structured exercise program.

The joint American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines are published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Eliminating exposure to all tobacco – including second-hand smoke – is highly recommended for patients with PAD. (American Heart Association)

Eliminating exposure to all tobacco – including second-hand smoke – is highly recommended for patients with PAD. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Frequent Simulation-Based Training may improve CPR proficiency among hospital staff

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – A new training model improved CPR skills in a clinical setting according to research presented during the Resuscitation Science Symposium at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Currently, hospital staff are only required to undergo formal CPR training every two years.

Hands-Only CPR has just two easy steps: If you see a teen or adult suddenly collapse, (1) Call 9-1-1 and (2) Push hard and fast in the center of the chest to the beat of the disco song “Stayin’ Alive.” The American Heart Association’s Hands-OnlyTM CPR at this beat can more than double or triple a person’s chances of survival. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association says CPR skills low among older adults

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LACPR increases the chance of survival after sudden cardiac arrest, yet knowledge of this life-saving procedure is low in many communities, especially among older adults, according to separate studies presented during the Resuscitation Science Symposium at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Hands On CPR. (American Heart Association)

Hands On CPR. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Smokers far more likely to develop abdominal aortic aneurysms

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People who smoke may be nearly twice as likely to develop an abdominal aortic aneurysm than the general population, but they can lower their risk of the potentially life-threating condition by quitting, according to new research in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, an American Heart Association journal.

An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a bulge in the large artery that supplies blood to the belly, pelvis and legs.

Quitting smoking can substantially reduce the risk of developing this life-threatening condition.

Quitting smoking can substantially reduce the risk of developing this life-threatening condition.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Age at Cancer Diagnosis may affect the Risk of Death from Heart Disease according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The age at which cancer survivors were diagnosed for cancer may help determine their risk of death from heart disease, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Heart disease has been known to be the leading cause of treatment-related, non-tumor deaths among survivors of childhood cancer, breast cancer and Hodgkin lymphoma.

For some types of cancer, the younger the age at cancer diagnosis, the greater the risk of heart disease. (American Heart Association)

For some types of cancer, the younger the age at cancer diagnosis, the greater the risk of heart disease. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports New Risk Assessment Tool May Better Predict Dynamic Risk of Heart Disease

 

The new tool is an extension of the ACC/AHA ASCVD Risk Estimator

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – A new assessment tool—the Million Hearts® Model Longitudinal ASCVD Risk Assessment tool—funded by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in partnership with the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association— is designed to help predict the 10-year risk of developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASVCD) and how that risk may change over time as preventive treatments are initiated.

The tool is an extension of the ASCVD Pooled Cohort Equation first published in the 2013 ACC/AHA Guideline on the Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association’s National Eating Healthy Day is Urging You to Be Colorful, Live Healthy

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – National Eating Healthy Day is Wednesday, November 2nd and as the American Heart Association’s new +color campaign emphasizes, it’s important to BE COLORFUL. Because as the old saying goes, “you are what you eat.”

On this iconic day, and throughout the entire month of November, the association wants to remind everyone that by adding more color to meals through fruits and vegetables, people can take simple yet significant steps to a more vibrant, healthier, longer life.

American Heart Association Healthy For Good. Be Colorful! You are what you eat. National Eating Healthy Day is November 2nd, 2016. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Recreational, Commuter Biking linked to Lower Cardiovascular Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People who bike regularly, either for pleasure or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, according to two separate studies published simultaneously in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation and Journal of the American Heart Association, the AHA/ASA’s Open Access Journal.

While structured cycling as part of a formal workout routine is already known to guard against cardiovascular illness, little is known about the effects of habitual biking done for leisure or as a way to commute.

People who bike regularly, either recreationally or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular illness, according to studies conducted in Denmark and Sweden.

People who bike regularly, either recreationally or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular illness, according to studies conducted in Denmark and Sweden.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says ‘Nancy’ cartoonist uses personal story to highlight Stroke Awareness

 

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A few years before starting the “Muppets” comic strip for Jim Henson, and long before becoming lead artist of “Nancy,” Guy Gilchrist had a stroke.

On Saturday, World Stroke Day, the cartoonist is teaming up with the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association to bring awareness to the disease that changed the course of his life and career.

NANCY copyright 2016 Guy Gilchrist. Reprinted by permission of UNIVERSAL UCLICK for UFS. All rights reserved.

NANCY copyright 2016 Guy Gilchrist. Reprinted by permission of UNIVERSAL UCLICK for UFS. All rights reserved.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Page 2 of 5612345...»

  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On GooglePlusVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our Feed
  • Personal Controls

    Archives

      December 2016
      S M T W T F S
      « Nov    
       123
      45678910
      11121314151617
      18192021222324
      25262728293031