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Topic: American Heart Association

Drinking coffee may be associated with reduced Risk of Heart Failure and Stroke according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Drinking coffee may be associated with a decreased risk of developing heart failure or having stroke, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Researchers used machine learning to analyze data from the long-running Framingham Heart Study, which includes information about what people eat and their cardiovascular health.

Compared to people who didn’t drink coffee, each cup of coffee a person drank resulted in a 7% lower risk of stroke and a 8% lower risk of heart failure. (American Heart Association)

Compared to people who didn’t drink coffee, each cup of coffee a person drank resulted in a 7% lower risk of stroke and a 8% lower risk of heart failure. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Sudden Cardiac Death rates may be seven times higher among Young People with Diabetes

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Children and young adults with diabetes may be seven times more likely to die from sudden cardiac death compared to children and young adults without diabetes, according to preliminary research from Denmark presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Sudden cardiac death is defined as a sudden, unexpected death that occurs instantly or shortly after symptoms appear.

Children and young adults with diabetes were seven times more likely to die from sudden cardiac death compared to children and young adults without diabetes in a Danish study. (American Heart Association)

Children and young adults with diabetes were seven times more likely to die from sudden cardiac death compared to children and young adults without diabetes in a Danish study. (American Heart Association)

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Gobbling your Food may harm your Waistline and Heart says American Heart Association

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – People who eat slowly are less likely to become obese or develop metabolic syndrome, a cluster of heart disease, diabetes and stroke risk factors, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Faster eating speed was associated with more weight gain, higher blood glucose and larger waistline. (American Heart Association)

Faster eating speed was associated with more weight gain, higher blood glucose and larger waistline. (American Heart Association)

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Low sodium-DASH diet combination dramatically lowers blood pressure in hypertensive adults

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – A combination of reduced sodium intake and the DASH diet lowers blood pressure in adults with hypertension, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Quality of Stent Procedures consistently good across U.S. regardless of popular Hospital Ranking

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report Poster Presentation S2003

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Hospitals ranked among the best in cardiology and heart surgery by U.S. News and World Report appear no better at performing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a potentially life-saving heart procedure, than unranked hospitals, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), or angioplasty, for blocked or narrowed arteries appear to fare equally well at hospitals ranked among the best in heart care by U.S. News and World Report and at unranked hospitals. (American Heart Association)

Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), or angioplasty, for blocked or narrowed arteries appear to fare equally well at hospitals ranked among the best in heart care by U.S. News and World Report and at unranked hospitals. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Sexual Activity rarely a Heart-Stopping Activity

 

Sunday News Tip Poster Presentation S2086

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CASexual activity is rarely associated with sudden cardiac arrest, a life-threatening malfunction of the heart’s electrical system causing the heart to suddenly stop beating, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

To determine whether sexual activity might trigger sudden cardiac arrest, researchers examined records on 4,557 cases of cardiac arrest in adults between 2002 and 2015 in a community in the northwestern United States.

One in 100 cases of cardiac arrest in men was associated with sexual activity, compared with one in 1,000 cases in women. (American Heart Association)

One in 100 cases of cardiac arrest in men was associated with sexual activity, compared with one in 1,000 cases in women. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Men more likely to receive bystander CPR in public than Women

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Men are more likely to receive bystander CPR in public locations compared to women, and they are more likely to survive after the life-saving measure, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Using data from the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, a network of regional clinical centers in the United States and Canada studying out-of-hospital treatments of cardiac arrest and trauma, researchers analyzed 19,331 cardiac events in the home and in public.

Hands-Only CPR has just two easy steps: If you see a teen or adult suddenly collapse, (1) Call 9-1-1 and (2) Push hard and fast in the center of the chest to the beat of the disco song “Stayin’ Alive.” The American Heart Association’s Hands-OnlyTM CPR at this beat can more than double or triple a person’s chances of survival. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reports More Cardiac Arrest Victims could Survive with Dispatcher CPR Instruction, Rescue Breaths for Children

 

American Heart Association Moves to Annual Guidelines Update, a First for the Organization

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – More people will survive cardiac arrest if emergency medical dispatchers give chest compression-only CPR instructions over the phone and if infants and children receive chest compressions with rescue breaths, according to updated CPR guidelines published today by the American Heart Association (Association), the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease.

The changes in the 2017 American Heart Association Focused Updates on Adult and Pediatric Basic Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality also re-emphasize the importance of bystanders starting immediate chest compressions if they see an adult collapse in a suspected cardiac arrest.

Man administers CPR to child in reenactment illustrating proper technique. (American Heart Association)

Man administers CPR to child in reenactment illustrating proper technique. (American Heart Association)

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More Physical Activity and Higher Intensity Physical Activity may significantly reduce Risk of Death in Older Women in the short term

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – More physical activity and at higher intensities could lead to a big drop in the risk of death in older women from any cause, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Researchers found the volume of light intensity physical activity or sedentary behavior was not associated with death rate. However, light intensity activity may be beneficial for other health outcomes not studied in this research.

Moderate to vigorous exercise, like brisk walking, cut the risk of death up to 70 percent among older women. Source: Circulation, November 6th, 2017, Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Relation to All-Cause Mortality. (American Heart Association)

Moderate to vigorous exercise, like brisk walking, cut the risk of death up to 70 percent among older women. Source: Circulation, November 6th, 2017, Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Relation to All-Cause Mortality. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Teen Childbirth linked to increased risk for Heart Disease

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXWomen who became first-time mothers as teens were significantly more likely than older mothers to have greater risks for heart and blood vessel disease later in life, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers found that women reporting a first birth before the age of 20 scored significantly higher on Framingham Risk Score — a measure commonly used to estimate the 10-year cardiovascular risk.

Women who become teen-age mothers may be significantly more likely to have greater risks for cardiovascular disease later in life than older mothers. (American Heart Association)

Women who become teen-age mothers may be significantly more likely to have greater risks for cardiovascular disease later in life than older mothers. (American Heart Association)

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