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Topic: American Heart Association

American Heart Association says Gum Disease, Tooth Loss may increase Postmenopausal Women’s Risk of Death

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Gum disease and tooth loss may be associated with a higher risk of death in postmenopausal women but not increased cardiovascular disease risk, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Loss of all natural teeth also was linked with an increased risk of death in postmenopausal women.

Gum disease and tooth loss in postmenopausal women may be linked to a higher risk of death. (American Heart Association)

Gum disease and tooth loss in postmenopausal women may be linked to a higher risk of death. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says New Process designed to streamline faster care for EMS Triage, transport of Stroke Patients

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new process, developed by the American Heart Association/ American Stroke Association, will help streamline the initial emergency care of stroke patients. 

The new Severity-based Stroke Triage Algorithm for emergency medical services (EMS) equips ambulance crews with information and tools to better identify a stroke, assess a patient’s overall condition and determine the best hospital for the patient’s specific treatment needs.

Getting the right treatment fast can help improve patient outcomes. (American Heart Association)

Getting the right treatment fast can help improve patient outcomes. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Older Adults with Heart Disease can become more independent and Heart Healthy with Physical Activity

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Improving physical activity among older adults with heart disease benefits their heart health, independence and quality of life, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Physical activity helps reduce heart disease symptoms for patients with heart failure, heart attacks and stroke, and it also helps to improve the age-related erosions of strength, balance, and reduces frailty that particularly affect older heart patients.

Healthcare providers should emphasize cardiac rehabilitation when appropriate and provide individualized guidance on increasing daily physical activities for older patients with heart disease. (American Heart Association)

Healthcare providers should emphasize cardiac rehabilitation when appropriate and provide individualized guidance on increasing daily physical activities for older patients with heart disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Coffee shops, ATMs may be ideal locations for lifesaving AEDs

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Community coffee shops and automated teller machines, or ATMs, might be ideal locations for public access to automated external defibrillators (AEDs), according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

An automated external defibrillator (AED) is a computerized medical device that can check a person’s heart rhythm and recognize a rhythm that requires a shock and advise the rescuer when a shock is needed.

CARDIAC ARREST occurs when the heart malfunctions and stops beating unexpectedly. Cardiac arrest is an "ELECTRICAL" problem. A HEART ATTACK occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked. A heart attack is a “CIRCULATION” problem. A blocked artery prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished by that artery begins to die. (American Heart Association)

CARDIAC ARREST occurs when the heart malfunctions and stops beating unexpectedly. Cardiac arrest is an “ELECTRICAL” problem. A HEART ATTACK occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked. A heart attack is a “CIRCULATION” problem. A blocked artery prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished by that artery begins to die. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Fish Oil Supplements may help prevent death after a Heart Attack but lack evidence of cardiovascular benefit for the general population

 

American Heart Association Science Advisory

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Omega-3 fish oil supplements prescribed by a healthcare provider may help prevent death from heart disease in patients who recently had a heart attack and may prevent death and hospitalizations in patients with heart failure, but there is a lack of scientific research to support clinical use of these supplements to prevent heart disease in the general population, according to a new science advisory from the American Heart Association.

“We cannot make a recommendation to use omega-3 fish oil supplements for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease at this time,” said David Siscovick, M.D., M.P.H., chair of the writing committee of the new science advisory published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Omega-3 fish oil supplements prescribed by a healthcare provider may be reasonable for patients who have had a heart attack. (American Heart Association)

Omega-3 fish oil supplements prescribed by a healthcare provider may be reasonable for patients who have had a heart attack. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Overweight and obese people are burdened by cardiovascular disease at younger ages

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPortland, OR – People who are overweight or obese may live as long as or less than those of healthy weight, but they experience cardiovascular disease at an earlier age and live longer burdened by the disease, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention / Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2017 Scientific Sessions.

Overweight and obese people have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease in their lifetime. (American Heart Association)

Overweight and obese people have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease in their lifetime. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Playing Pokémon Go may help people reach 10,000 daily steps goal

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPortland, OR – Playing the popular smartphone game Pokémon Go may increase people’s daily steps, especially among young adults with low physical activity levels or those who are overweight or obese, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention / Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2017 Scientific Sessions.

In Pokémon Go, a location-based augmented reality game, players move around a physical location capturing animated creatures on smartphones and other mobile devices. Pokémon Go has generated a great deal of interest since it was released in July 2016, but few studies have examined whether playing the game can increase an individual’s level of physical activity.

When guided by internet programs or mobile devices, people can become more physically active, eat better, lose a little weight and reduce tobacco and alcohol use. (American Heart Association)

When guided by internet programs or mobile devices, people can become more physically active, eat better, lose a little weight and reduce tobacco and alcohol use. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Eating in Social Settings may be greatest temptation for Dieters

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPortland, OR – For people trying to lose weight or maintain a lower body weight, the temptation to overeat is stronger when eating in a social setting, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention / Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2017 Scientific Sessions.

The 12-month study of 150 people (90 percent women) used smartphones and a custom-developed application to capture data as dieters moved through everyday life.

For people trying to lose or maintain weight, the temptation to overeat is stronger when eating in a social setting.

For people trying to lose or maintain weight, the temptation to overeat is stronger when eating in a social setting.

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American Heart Association says Pacemaker function may be impacted by Electric Appliances; Tools

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Electric and magnetic fields (EMF) generated from everyday household appliances, electrical tools and more, used in very close proximity to the body, can interfere with the ability of pacemakers to regulate patients’ heartbeats, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Electromagnetic interferences with pacemakers in everyday life can occur, however, harmful interferences are rare using vendors’ recommended device settings,” said Andreas Napp, M.D., study author and cardiologist at RWTH Aachen University Hospital in Aachen, Germany. “Dedicated device programming is an effective measure to reduce the individual risk of interference. For example, doctors can reprogram pacemakers to a lower sensitivity to reduce EMF susceptibility.” 

Electric and magnetic fields generated from everyday household appliances, electrical tools and more, used in very close proximity to the body, can interfere with the ability of pacemakers to regulate patients’ heartbeats. (American Heart Association)

Electric and magnetic fields generated from everyday household appliances, electrical tools and more, used in very close proximity to the body, can interfere with the ability of pacemakers to regulate patients’ heartbeats. (American Heart Association)

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American Stroke Association reports Psychiatric Illness may increase Stroke Risk

 

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationHouston, TX – Patients hospitalized or treated in the emergency room for depression, anxiety, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or other psychiatric disorders may have an increased risk for stroke, particularly in the 15 days following their psychiatric diagnosis, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017.

Risk of stroke was greatest within 15 days of psychiatric diagnosis, declined with time, but persists for at least a year. (American Heart Association)

Risk of stroke was greatest within 15 days of psychiatric diagnosis, declined with time, but persists for at least a year.. (American Heart Association)

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