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Topic: American Heart Association

American Heart Association reports Mental Stress-Induced constricted blood vessels more likely in Women

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In women with heart disease, constriction of peripheral vessels during mental stress affects the heart circulation more than men’s, potentially raising women’s risk of heart-related events and death, according to new research in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, an American Heart Association journal.

In most people, mental stress causes peripheral vessels to constrict. In people with heart disease, this effect can cause a reduction in blood supply to the heart muscle called “ischemia.”

Woman in Stress

Woman in Stress

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American Heart Association reports Unmarried Heart Patients face higher risk of Death

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Compared to married heart disease patients, being unmarried was associated with a higher risk of dying, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

This is the first study to show an association between marital status and death from any cause and heart disease-related death in a high-risk heart patient population. (American Heart Association)

This is the first study to show an association between marital status and death from any cause and heart disease-related death in a high-risk heart patient population. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Abuse and Adversity in Childhood linked to more Cardiovascular Risk in Adulthood

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children and teens who are abused, witness violence, are bullied or face other adversities are more likely to develop cardiovascular diseases in adulthood, according to a new scientific statement by the American Heart Association published in the Association’s journal Circulation.

The statement is based on a review of existing scientific research published in peer-reviewed medical journals that documents a strong association between adverse experiences in childhood and teen years and a greater likelihood of developing risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes earlier than those not experiencing adverse experiences.

Children and teens who experience abuse, bullying, neglect or witness violence and other forms of adversity are more likely to develop heart and blood vessel diseases as adults. (American Heart Association)

Children and teens who experience abuse, bullying, neglect or witness violence and other forms of adversity are more likely to develop heart and blood vessel diseases as adults. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Treating Gum Disease may help Lower Blood Pressure

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Treatment for gum disease, or periodontitis, significantly lowered blood pressure among Chinese patients at risk for developing high blood pressure, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Intensive dental treatment for gum disease lowered blood pressure up to 13 points. (American Heart Association)

Intensive dental treatment for gum disease lowered blood pressure up to 13 points. (American Heart Association)

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Sleep deprivation may increase risk of cardiovascular disease in older women

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Older women who don’t get enough sleep were more likely to have poor cardiovascular health, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

In the new study, researchers considered sleeping at least two hours more during the weekend than on the weekday as a sign of being in sleep debt.

Sleeping woman. (American Heart Association)

Sleeping woman. (American Heart Association)

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E-cigarettes are more likely to be used by alcohol drinkers and former cigarette smokers

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Electronic cigarettes are more frequently used by people who recently quit smoking and alcohol drinkers, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

E-Cigarette. (American Heart Association)

E-Cigarette. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Stressful Events can increase Women’s Odds of Obesity

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Women who experienced one or more traumatic lifetime events or several negative events in recent years had higher odds of being obese than women who didn’t report such stress, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Women who reported four or more negative events in the last five years, such as unemployed though wanting work, had increased odds of obesity.

Women who reported four or more negative events in the last five years, such as unemployed though wanting work, had increased odds of obesity.

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Heat-not-Burn Tobacco Products may be ‘not so hot’ at protecting Blood Vessel Function

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Heat-not-burn devices may eliminate users’ exposure to tobacco smoke, but the vapor they produce has the same negative impact on blood vessel function as smoking, according to a preliminary animal study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Heat-not-burn products are not new, but have been recently updated and test marketed in several countries outside the United States with greater success.

iQOS device used in “Impairment of Endothelial Function by Inhalation of Heat-Not-Burn Tobacco Aerosol” study. (Jesse Elias)

iQOS device used in “Impairment of Endothelial Function by Inhalation of Heat-Not-Burn Tobacco Aerosol” study. (Jesse Elias)

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Heart failure in Methamphetamine Users: Could this be the next epidemic among Vets?

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CAHeart failure associated with methamphetamine (meth) use has risen dramatically in recent years among U.S. veterans, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Heart failure associated with methamphetamine use is on the rise among U.S. veterans. (American Heart Association)

Heart failure associated with methamphetamine use is on the rise among U.S. veterans. (American Heart Association)

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Catastrophic costs for hospitalization expenses common among Uninsured Heart and Stroke Patients

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – The majority of patients without health insurance who were hospitalized for heart attack, stroke or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery experienced catastrophic healthcare expenses before passage of the Affordable Care Act, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

For those who were uninsured, hospitalization expenses were catastrophic for 85 percent of heart attack patients, 75 percent of stroke patients and 80 percent of CABG patients. (American Heart Association)

For those who were uninsured, hospitalization expenses were catastrophic for 85 percent of heart attack patients, 75 percent of stroke patients and 80 percent of CABG patients. (American Heart Association)

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