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Topic: American Heart Association

American Heart Association launches CEO Roundtable To Significantly Shift The Culture Of Health In The Workplace

 

The American Heart Association CEO Roundtable launches with new survey showing American workers overestimate their health—leading to increased risk of heart disease and other serious illness

American Heart AssociationNew York, NY — Today, Nancy Brown, CEO of the American Heart Association (AHA), Henry Kravis, Co-CEO and Co-Chairman of KKR & Co. L.P., Terry Lundgren, Chairman and CEO of Macy’s, Inc., and 19 additional CEOs from some of America’s largest companies announced the formation of the American Heart Association CEO Roundtable. This groundbreaking initiative is designed to create a workplace culture in which healthy choices are the default choices. As part of the announcement, the AHA also released results from a new Nielsen online survey among 2,004 employees[1] showing that Americans overestimate their health—putting them at greater risk for heart disease and other serious illness.

The three co-chairs of the American Heart Association CEO Roundtable talk during a meeting of the Roundtable in July: From left: Henry Kravis, Co-CEO and Co-Chair of KKR & Co. L.P.; American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown; and Terry Lundgren, Chairman and CEO of Macy’s, Inc. (American Heart Association)

The three co-chairs of the American Heart Association CEO Roundtable talk during a meeting of the Roundtable in July: From left: Henry Kravis, Co-CEO and Co-Chair of KKR & Co. L.P.; American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown; and Terry Lundgren, Chairman and CEO of Macy’s, Inc. (American Heart Association)

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Heatstroke or stroke? American Heart Association says you should Learn the signs of each

 

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – As the mercury soars and cool water and shade becomes more precious than gold, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association asks consumers to learn the signs of heatstroke, which differ from the signs of stroke.

“While heatstroke contains the word stroke and both are potentially life-threatening medical emergencies, stroke and heatstroke are not the same condition,” said Rani Whitfield, M.D., family practitioner and American Stroke Association spokesperson. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Watching too much TV may increase risk of Early Death in Adults

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Adults who watch TV for three hours or more each day may double their risk of premature death compared to those who watch less, according to new research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Television viewing is a major sedentary behavior and there is an increasing trend toward all types of sedentary behaviors,” said Miguel Martinez-Gonzalez, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., the study’s lead author and professor and chair of the Department of Public Health at the University of Navarra in Pamplona, Spain. “Our findings are consistent with a range of previous studies where time spent watching television was linked to mortality.”

Researchers suggest adults should consider getting regular exercise, avoiding long sedentary periods and reducing TV viewing to one to two hours a day. (American Heart Association)

Researchers suggest adults should consider getting regular exercise, avoiding long sedentary periods and reducing TV viewing to one to two hours a day. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says quitting Smokeless Tobacco after Heart Attack may Extend Life Expectancy

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People who stop using smokeless tobacco after a heart attack may extend their life expectancy similar to people who stop smoking, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

“We didn’t expect to see such a strong association among those people who stopped using (smokeless tobacco),” said Gabriel Arefalk, M.D., lead researcher and cardiologist at Uppsala University Hospital in Uppsala, Sweden. “After a heart attack, no doubt smoking cessation reduces the risk of death approximately one third and is really a cornerstone of cardiac rehabilitation worldwide. For smokeless tobacco, we did not know.”

Quitting smokeless tobacco after a heart attack extends life expectancy similar to quitting smoking. (American Heart Association)

Quitting smokeless tobacco after a heart attack extends life expectancy similar to quitting smoking. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Depression linked to higher Heart Disease Death Risk in Younger Women

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women  55 and younger are twice as likely to suffer a heart attack, die or require artery-opening procedures if they’re moderately or severely depressed, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Women in this age group are also more likely to have depression, so this may be one of the ‘hidden’ risk factors that can help explain why women die at a disproportionately higher rate than men after a heart attack,” said Amit Shah, M.D., M.S.C.R., study author and assistant professor of Epidemiology at Emory University in Atlanta, GA. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reports Gender-specific research improves accuracy of Heart Disease Diagnosis in Women

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Diagnosing coronary heart disease in women has become more accurate through gender-specific research that clarifies the role of both obstructive and non-obstructive coronary artery disease as contributors to ischemic heart disease in women, according to a new statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

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American Heart Association reports processed Red Meat linked to higher risk of Heart Failure, Death in Men

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Men who eat moderate amounts of processed red meat may have an increased risk of incidence and death from heart failure, according to a study in Circulation: Heart Failure, an American Heart Association journal.

Processed meats are preserved by smoking, curing, salting or adding preservatives. Examples include cold cuts (ham, salami), sausage, bacon and hot dogs.

Bacon Frying. (American Heart Association)

Bacon Frying. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says lifetime cancer risk from heart imaging tests is low for most children; more complex tests may raise risk

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Radiation from standard X-rays is relatively low and doesn’t significantly raise lifetime cancer risks for most young children, according to research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Researchers followed 337 children under age 6 who had surgery for heart disease at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, NC. Their operations required almost 14,000 imaging procedures, including X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scans, and cardiac catheterization procedures using video X-rays called fluoroscopies. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reports Heart Disease without coronary plaque buildup linked to Heart Attack Risk

 

American Heart AssociationBaltimore, MD – Non-obstructive coronary artery disease was associated with a 28 to 44 percent increased risk of a major adverse cardiac event such as a heart attack or death, in a new study presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research 2014 Scientific Sessions.

Non-obstructive CAD damages the walls of the heart’s blood vessels, but doesn’t result in decreased blood flow or symptoms so it’s generally been considered to be a low-risk condition.

Heart disease without coronary plaque buildup linked to heart attack risk «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reports many Breast Cancer Patients don’t get treatment for Heart problems

 

American Heart AssociationBaltimore, MD – Only a third of older breast cancer patients saw a cardiologist within 90 days of developing heart problems, in a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research 2014 Scientific Sessions.

Breast cancer patients with heart problems who saw a cardiologist were more likely to receive standard therapy for their heart failure than those who did not see a heart specialist, the study found. «Read the rest of this article»

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