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Topic: American Stroke Association

CDC reports Adult and Teen Obesity Rates hit all-time high

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate the adult obesity rates in the United States are now a staggering 40 percent while youth obesity rates grew to 20 percent for 12-to-19-year-olds.

An all-time high, these rates and the persistent disparities across different race-ethnicity groups further elevate public health concerns about how our nation can prevent and reduce obesity.

American Heart Association calls for transformative change to reverse trends in obesity. (American Heart Association)

American Heart Association calls for transformative change to reverse trends in obesity. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Tai Chi holds promise as Cardiac Rehab Exercise

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The slow and gentle movements of Tai Chi hold promise as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline traditional cardiac rehabilitation, according to preliminary research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

After a heart attack, more than 60 percent of patients decline participation in cardiac rehabilitation.

The slow and gentle movements of Tai Chi – which can increase in pace – hold promise as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline traditional cardiac rehabilitation. (American Heart Association)

The slow and gentle movements of Tai Chi – which can increase in pace – hold promise as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline traditional cardiac rehabilitation. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association releases New Music Video to raise awareness of Stroke Warning Signs

 

American Stroke Association launches a Y.M.C.A parody song to educate about stroke

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA), the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease and stroke, is releasing a new parody music video to teach people how to recognize the most common stroke warning signs.

Worldwide, stroke is the No. 2 cause of death and a leading cause of serious disability. For the American Stroke Association, raising awareness of stroke is more critical than ever, as new reports indicate that stroke deaths are on the rise.

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American Heart Association reports Danish study finds One in Four People leave Work a year after a Heart Attack

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – One in four people leave their job within a year of returning to work after having a heart attack, according to a newly published study from Denmark in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

While previous studies have looked at return to work following heart attack, this study analyzed long-term employment. Despite a high number of heart attack patients returning to their jobs shortly after the event, the new findings reveal a surprisingly high degree of unemployment within a year after a heart attack patient returns to work.

Heart attack survivors with diabetes, heart failure, depression and lower educational and income levels were the most likely to not be working a year after their heart attack. (American Heart Association)

Heart attack survivors with diabetes, heart failure, depression and lower educational and income levels were the most likely to not be working a year after their heart attack. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association gives Seven steps to keep your Brain Healthy from Childhood to Old Age

 

American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Presidential Advisory

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A healthy lifestyle benefits your brain as much as the rest of your body — and may lessen the risk of cognitive decline (a loss of the ability to think well) as you age, according to a new advisory from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Both the heart and brain need adequate blood flow, but in many people, blood vessels slowly become narrowed or blocked over the course of their life, a disease process known as atherosclerosis, the cause of many heart attacks and strokes.

Improving your health status with Life’s Simple 7 may reduce the risk of dementia caused by strokes, vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. (American Heart Association)

Improving your health status with Life’s Simple 7 may reduce the risk of dementia caused by strokes, vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Brain Activity may be predictor of Stress-Related Cardiovascular Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The brain may have a distinctive activity pattern during stressful events that predicts bodily reactions, such as rises in blood pressure that increase risk for cardiovascular disease, according to new proof-of-concept research in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The new research, the largest brain-imaging study of cardiovascular stress physiology to date, introduced a brain-based explanation of why stress might influence a person’s heart health.   

A pattern of brain activity that occurs during psychological stress may predict bodily reactions, such as surges in our blood pressure, that increase risk for cardiovascular disease. (American Heart Association)

A pattern of brain activity that occurs during psychological stress may predict bodily reactions, such as surges in our blood pressure, that increase risk for cardiovascular disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Disadvantaged Kids may be at higher risk for Heart Disease later in life

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children from socially and economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods appear more likely to have thicker carotid artery walls, which in adults may indicate higher risk for heart attack and stroke in later life, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The carotid arteries supply blood to the brain. An ultrasound test of the arteries’ inner layers, the intima and media, may detect the early development of atherosclerosis, or “hardening of the arteries,” which underlies the development of cardiovascular disease later in life.

Children from socially and economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods appear more likely to have thicker carotid artery walls, which in middle-aged and older adults has been associated with higher risk for heart attack and stroke. (American Heart Association)

Children from socially and economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods appear more likely to have thicker carotid artery walls, which in middle-aged and older adults has been associated with higher risk for heart attack and stroke. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says quitting statins after stroke may raise risk of another stroke

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXStroke patients who stopped taking statin drugs three to six months after a first ischemic stroke, the type caused by narrowed arteries, had a higher risk of a having another stroke within a year, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers also found that discontinuing statin drugs, which lower cholesterol, between three and six months after a first ischemic stroke was linked to higher risk of death and hospitalization among the patients in the study.

Stopping statin drug therapy between three and six months after a first ischemic stroke is associated with a higher risk of another stroke within a year. (American Heart Association)

Stopping statin drug therapy between three and six months after a first ischemic stroke is associated with a higher risk of another stroke within a year. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says National Institutes of Health funding dwindles for Cardiac Arrest Research

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding to conduct cardiac arrest research has dwindled in the last decade and is a fraction of what the government spends to study other leading causes of death, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Study authors cite Institute of Medicine statistics that suggest cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the United States, claiming more than 450,000 lives each year.

NIH Research Funding Graphic. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Breastfeeding may reduce a Mother’s Heart Attack and Stroke Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Breastfeeding is not only healthy for babies, it may also reduce a mother’s risk of having a heart attack or stroke later in life, according to new research published in of the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Previous studies have suggested that mothers get short-term health benefits from breastfeeding, such as weight loss and lower cholesterol, blood pressure and glucose levels after pregnancy.

A study of Chinese women found that the longer a mother breastfeeds, the greater the cardiovascular health benefit appears to be. (American Heart Association)

A study of Chinese women found that the longer a mother breastfeeds, the greater the cardiovascular health benefit appears to be. (American Heart Association)

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