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Topic: American Stroke Association

American Stroke Association reports Psychiatric Illness may increase Stroke Risk

 

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationHouston, TX – Patients hospitalized or treated in the emergency room for depression, anxiety, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or other psychiatric disorders may have an increased risk for stroke, particularly in the 15 days following their psychiatric diagnosis, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017.

Risk of stroke was greatest within 15 days of psychiatric diagnosis, declined with time, but persists for at least a year. (American Heart Association)

Risk of stroke was greatest within 15 days of psychiatric diagnosis, declined with time, but persists for at least a year.. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Headache far more common Stroke Symptom in Children than Adults

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationHouston, TX – Children are far more likely than adults to report headache when having a stroke, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017.

“Stroke should be considered as a possible diagnosis in any child with a headache and additional symptoms of weakness or numbness (in the face, arm, or leg) or changes in walking, talking, or vision. Urgent brain imaging may be required to distinguish a migraine with aura from a stroke,” said Lori L. Billinghurst, M.D., M.Sc., lead author of the study, clinical assistant professor of neurology at the University of Pennsylvania, and apediatric neurologist at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Infographic on Pediatric Stroke. (American Stroke Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Heart risks in Middle Age Boost Dementia Risk later in Life

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationHouston, TX – People who have heart disease risks in middle age – such as diabetes, high blood pressure or smoking – are at higher risk for dementia later in life, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017.

“The health of your vascular system in midlife is really important to the health of your brain when you are older,” said Rebecca F. Gottesman, M.D., Ph.D., lead researcher and associate professor of neurology and epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

Cardiovascular disease risk factors in midle age increase dementia risk later in life. Dementia was: 41% higher in smokers; 39% higher in people with high blood pressure; 77% higher in people with diabetes. (American Heart Association)

Cardiovascular disease risk factors in midle age increase dementia risk later in life. Dementia was: 41% higher in smokers; 39% higher in people with high blood pressure; 77% higher in people with diabetes. (American Heart Association)

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Exercise can significantly improve Brain Function after Stroke according to American Heart Association

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationHouston, TXStructured exercise training can significantly improve brain function in stroke survivors, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017.

Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States, and the leading cause of long-term disability. Studies estimate that up to 85 percent of people who suffer a stroke will have cognitive impairments, including deficits in executive function, attention and working memory.

Structured physical activity training after a stroke effectively improves brain function. (American Heart Association)

Structured physical activity training after a stroke effectively improves brain function. (American Heart Association)

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American Stroke Association says African-American women at risk of Cardiovascular Disease report more Loneliness, Financial Strain

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationHouston, TX – African-American women at risk for cardiovascular disease face unique factors that cause them to report more loneliness than non-Hispanic white women, according to a small study presented at the Nursing Symposium taking place during the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017.

In a study of women with at least two cardiovascular risk factors, compared to whie women, African-American women were about twice as likely to report loneliness and almost 3 times as likely to report financial stress. (American Heart Association)

In a study of women with at least two cardiovascular risk factors, compared to whie women, African-American women were about twice as likely to report loneliness and almost 3 times as likely to report financial stress. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Long-Term Heavy Drinking may Age Arteries over time

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Heavy alcohol drinking habits over the years may prematurely age arteries, especially in men, putting them at an increased risk for heart disease, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Drinking too much, can affect the elasticity of the arterial walls (arterial stiffness) and prematurely age the arteries, interfering with blood flow.

Heavy alcohol drinking habits over the years may prematurely age arteries, especially in men, putting them at an increased risk for heart disease, compared to consistently moderate drinkers. (American Heart Association)

Heavy alcohol drinking habits over the years may prematurely age arteries, especially in men, putting them at an increased risk for heart disease, compared to consistently moderate drinkers. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Parents of Children with serious Heart Defects may be at risk of PTSD

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Parents of children with “critical” congenital heart defects – which require at least one cardiac surgery – are at high risk for mental health problems, particularly post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety and depression, according to research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Health professionals know that mental health issues in parents can lead to long-term cognitive, health and behavioral troubles in their children. Researchers reviewed published data from 10 countries.

Dr. Sarah Woolf-King, Ph.D., M.P.H. plays with two-year-old son Charlie in 2014. (Gayle Photography)

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American Heart Association says Seven Heart-Healthy Habits could save billions in Medicare costs

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – More than $41 billion a year in Medicare costs could be saved if all beneficiaries achieved ideal levels for five to seven heart-healthy habits to reduce cardiovascular risk, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. 

At least $41 billion annually in Medicare costs could be saved if beneficiaries adopted five to seven of the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 healthy habits to reduce cardiovascular disease.

At least $41 billion annually in Medicare costs could be saved if beneficiaries adopted five to seven of the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 healthy habits to reduce cardiovascular disease.

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Heart-related deaths spike at Christmas according to the American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXHeart-related deaths spike during Christmas, but the effect may have nothing to do with the cold winter season, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

“Spikes in deaths from natural causes during Christmas and New Year’s Day has been previously established in the United States,” said Josh Knight, B.Sc., study author and research fellow at the University of Melbourne in Australia.

Heart-related deaths spike around Christmas, and the effect may not be because of the cold winter season. (American Heart Association)

Heart-related deaths spike around Christmas, and the effect may not be because of the cold winter season. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says High Pain Tolerance may mask Heart Attack Symptoms

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Heart attacks may go unrecognized among individuals with high pain tolerance, putting them at an increased risk for poor recoveries, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

A heart attack does not always have obvious symptoms, such as pain in your chest, shortness of breath and cold sweats.

This is the cold pressor test that measured pain tolerance as participants placed their hand in ice-cold water at 3 degrees Celsius (about 37 degrees Fahrenheit) for as long as possible, up to two minutes. From Researcher Andrea Ohrn, M.D., study lead author and Ph.D. Fellow at University of Tromsø in Norway. (Stina Grønbech)

This is the cold pressor test that measured pain tolerance as participants placed their hand in ice-cold water at 3 degrees Celsius (about 37 degrees Fahrenheit) for as long as possible, up to two minutes. From Researcher Andrea Ohrn, M.D., study lead author and Ph.D. Fellow at University of Tromsø in Norway. (Stina Grønbech)

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