Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: American Stroke Association

American Heart Association says ‘Nancy’ cartoonist uses personal story to highlight Stroke Awareness

 

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A few years before starting the “Muppets” comic strip for Jim Henson, and long before becoming lead artist of “Nancy,” Guy Gilchrist had a stroke.

On Saturday, World Stroke Day, the cartoonist is teaming up with the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association to bring awareness to the disease that changed the course of his life and career.

NANCY copyright 2016 Guy Gilchrist. Reprinted by permission of UNIVERSAL UCLICK for UFS. All rights reserved.

NANCY copyright 2016 Guy Gilchrist. Reprinted by permission of UNIVERSAL UCLICK for UFS. All rights reserved.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Stroke Association urges everyone to learn ‘FAST’ response to stroke for World Stroke Day

 

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – When punch dribbled out of the side of Dan Merritt’s mouth during a Halloween celebration at his daughter’s house, his wife quickly recognized stroke signs and drove him to the hospital.

“In hindsight, we did the right thing, the wrong way,” Barbara Merritt said. “We should have called 911 right away. Fortunately, Dan’s story turned out okay, but we know we got incredibly lucky.”

World Stroke Day 2016 Infographic. (American Stroke Association) «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Drinking alcohol daily may enlarge heart chamber; lead to atrial fibrillation according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Despite the common perception that moderate alcohol intake is good for the heart, new research suggests long-term alcohol consumption, even as little as one drink a day may enlarge the heart’s left upper chamber (atrium) and increase the risk of developing atrial fibrillation, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Daily, long-term alcohol consumption was associated with a five percent higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

Daily, long-term alcohol consumption was associated with a five percent higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association says Internet and Mobile Devices prompt positive lifestyle changes

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People are more likely to adopt heart healthy behaviors when guided and encouraged via the Internet, their cellphones or other devices, according to 23 years of research reviewed in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

When guided by internet programs or mobile devices, people can become more physically active, eat better, lose a little weight and reduce tobacco and alcohol use. (American Heart Association)

When guided by internet programs or mobile devices, people can become more physically active, eat better, lose a little weight and reduce tobacco and alcohol use. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Anemic Adults may have a higher risk of Death after Stroke

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Anemia, a lack of red blood cells, may be linked to a higher risk of death in older adults who have had a stroke, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Brain Clot. (American Heart Association)

Brain Clot. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Blood Glucose Health is decreasing in Obese Adults; increasing risks for Type 2 Diabetes, Cardio Complications

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXBlood glucose health is deteriorating in obese adults, despite overall progress in lowering blood pressure and cholesterol levels, which may raise the risk of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers said their findings suggest that controlling weight in obese adults to reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes should be a public health priority. (American Heart Association)

Researchers said their findings suggest that controlling weight in obese adults to reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes should be a public health priority. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Post Coronary Artery Bypass Infections may be linked to severe Obesity

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXCoronary artery bypass patients who have severe obesity are more likely to experience infection shortly after surgery and stay in the hospital longer, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Compared to coronary artery bypass patients with normal weight, patients with severe obesity were three times more likely to develop an infection after bypass surgery, researchers said.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Stroke Association lists Five fast things you should know about Stroke

 

May is Stroke Month

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – You don’t need superpowers to be a hero when it comes to stroke, you just need to pay attention to the risk factors and know the warning signs.

“Stroke is largely preventable and treatable,” said Mary Ann Bauman, M.D., chair of the American Stroke Association Advisory Committee. “The best way to beat a stroke is to never have one – about 80 percent of strokes are preventable. The second best way to beat a stroke is to identify one immediately when it occurs and call 911.”

For American Stroke Month this May, the American Stroke Association’s Together to End Stroke™ initiative, nationally sponsored by Medtronic, offers five things everyone should know to be a Stroke Hero.

Stroke Hero «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Stroke Association reports Rapid symptom improvement may not indicate better stroke recovery

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationLos Angeles, CA – Stroke patients whose symptoms quickly improved before hospital arrival did not always have better recoveries than other patients, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2016.

“Patients with very early rapid neurological improvement when first examined at the hospital still need to be considered for therapy to dissolve blood clots, given the high rate of unfavorable outcome,” said Clotilde Balucani, M.D., Ph.D., lead author and research assistant professor in neurology at The State University of New York Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn.

Doctors may consider administering clot-busting therapy to those patients whose stroke symptoms rapidly improved before hospital arrival. (American Heart Association)

Doctors may consider administering clot-busting therapy to those patients whose stroke symptoms rapidly improved before hospital arrival. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Stroke Association reports Pregnancy in older age increases Stroke, Heart Attack risk years later

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationLos Angeles, CA – Women who become pregnant at age 40 or older face a greater risk of stroke and heart attack later in life than women who become pregnant at a younger age, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2016.

“We already knew that older women were more likely than younger women to experience health problems during their pregnancy,” said Adnan I. Qureshi, M.D., lead researcher and director of the Zeenat Qureshi Stroke Institute in St. Cloud, Minnesota. “Now, we know that the consequences of that later pregnancy stretch years into the future.”

Women pregnant at age 40 or older face a greater risk of stroke and heart attack later in life than those pregnant at a younger age. (American Heart Association)

Women pregnant at age 40 or older face a greater risk of stroke and heart attack later in life than those pregnant at a younger age. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Page 1 of 612345...»

  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On GooglePlusVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our Feed
  • Personal Controls

    Archives

      December 2016
      S M T W T F S
      « Nov    
       123
      45678910
      11121314151617
      18192021222324
      25262728293031