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Topic: American Stroke Association

American Heart Association reports Energy Drinks may increase risk of Heart Function Abnormalities, Blood Pressure Changes

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to a small study published in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, drinking 32 ounces of an energy drink in a short time span may increase blood pressure and the risk of electrical disturbances in the heart. This can affect heart rhythm.

Three to four hours after drinking 32 ounces of energy drinks, the heart’s electrical activity was abnormal compared to drinking a placebo drink. (American Heart Association)

Three to four hours after drinking 32 ounces of energy drinks, the heart’s electrical activity was abnormal compared to drinking a placebo drink. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association study shows Veterans with depression and/or PTSD more likely to seek cardiac rehab

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, veterans who have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and/or depression were more likely to use cardiac rehabilitation services after an episode of ischemic heart disease than those who didn’t have PTSD or depression.

A large study offers new evidence that mental health disorders may not be a barrier to cardiac rehabilitation. (American Heart Association)

A large study offers new evidence that mental health disorders may not be a barrier to cardiac rehabilitation. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Fainting during the First Trimester of Pregnancy may raise risk of problems for Mom, Baby

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research published in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, pregnant women who faint (syncope) during pregnancy, especially in their first trimester, may have a higher risk of health problems for themselves and their babies .

In a study of nearly a half million women between 2005 and 2014, about 1% of women fainted during pregnancy and the rates appear to be increasing by 5% each year. (American Heart Association)

In a study of nearly a half million women between 2005 and 2014, about 1% of women fainted during pregnancy and the rates appear to be increasing by 5% each year. (American Heart Association)

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American Stroke Association reports Counties with Dirtier Air have more Stroke Deaths

 

American Stroke Association

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In a nationwide study, counties with dirtier air had higher rates of stroke deaths and shorter life expectancies, according to preliminary research to be presented in Honolulu at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2019, a world premier meeting for researchers and clinicians dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease.

Researchers examined the average yearly levels air pollution (PM2.5) that contains fine inhalable particles.

About half of U.S. counties have annual air pollution levels that exceed guidelines from the Environmental Protection Agency. (American Heart Association)

About half of U.S. counties have annual air pollution levels that exceed guidelines from the Environmental Protection Agency. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Climate Change may increase Congenital Heart Defects

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Rising temperatures stemming from global climate change may increase the number of infants born with congenital heart defects (CHD) in the United States over the next two decades and may result in as many as 7,000 additional cases over an 11 year-period in eight representative states (Arkansas, Texas, California, Iowa, North Caroline, Georgia, New York and Utah), according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The greatest percentage increases in the number of congenital heart defects are predicted in the Midwest, followed by the Northeast and the South. (American Heart Association)

The greatest percentage increases in the number of congenital heart defects are predicted in the Midwest, followed by the Northeast and the South. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Cigarette Smoking associated with increased risk of Peripheral Artery Disease in African Americans

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – African Americans who smoke cigarettes are more likely than those who don’t smoke to develop peripheral artery disease, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a narrowing of arteries other then those directly serving the heart.

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Smoke-free policies associated with Lower Blood Pressure

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Smoke-free policies have been associated with lower systolic (top number) blood pressure readings among non-smokers, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

While smoke-free policies – laws that prohibit smoking in public places like bars and restaurants – have been associated with reduced rates of hospitalization for heart disease, previous studies have not examined changes in blood pressure.

Non-smokers who had access to smoke-free restaurants, bars and workplaces had lower systolic blood pressure readings than those who lived in areas without smoke-free laws. (American Heart Association)

Non-smokers who had access to smoke-free restaurants, bars and workplaces had lower systolic blood pressure readings than those who lived in areas without smoke-free laws. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Breastfeeding may help protect Mothers against Stroke

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Breastfeeding is not only good for babies, there is growing evidence it may also reduce the risk for stroke in post-menopausal women who reported breastfeeding at least one child, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death among women aged 65 and older, and is the third leading cause of death among Hispanic and black women aged 65 and older, according to the study.

The association between breastfeeding and lower risk of stroke was stronger in women who breastfed for longer than six months and for black women. (American Heart Association)

The association between breastfeeding and lower risk of stroke was stronger in women who breastfed for longer than six months and for black women. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Older Adults who get physical can lower their Heart Disease Risk

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Adults in their early 60s, who spend less time sitting and more time engaged in light to vigorous physical activity, benefit with healthier levels of heart and vessel disease markers, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The results from increased physical activity were found to be particularly good among women.

Adults in their early 60s, who spend less time sitting and more time engaged in physical activity have healthier levels of heart and vessel disease indicators. (American Heart Association)

Adults in their early 60s, who spend less time sitting and more time engaged in physical activity have healthier levels of heart and vessel disease indicators. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Poor air quality does not offset exercise’s heart benefits

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Even in areas with moderate-to-high levels of traffic pollution, regular physical activity reduced the risk of first and recurrent heart attack, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

“While exercise is known to reduce cardiovascular disease risk; pollution can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, including heart attacks, asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease,” said Nadine Kubesch, Ph.D., lead author and researcher at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.

Even in areas with moderate to high levels of traffic pollution, regular physical activity reduced the risk of first and recurrent heart attack. (American Heart Association)

Even in areas with moderate to high levels of traffic pollution, regular physical activity reduced the risk of first and recurrent heart attack. (American Heart Association)

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