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Topic: Arteries

American Heart Association reports New Risk Assessment Tool May Better Predict Dynamic Risk of Heart Disease

 

The new tool is an extension of the ACC/AHA ASCVD Risk Estimator

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – A new assessment tool—the Million Hearts® Model Longitudinal ASCVD Risk Assessment tool—funded by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in partnership with the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association— is designed to help predict the 10-year risk of developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASVCD) and how that risk may change over time as preventive treatments are initiated.

The tool is an extension of the ASCVD Pooled Cohort Equation first published in the 2013 ACC/AHA Guideline on the Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Heart Disease, Stroke Risk factors may increase in severity before Menopause

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The severity of key risk factors for heart disease, diabetes and stroke appears to increase more rapidly in the years leading up to menopause, rather than after, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The study also found that this pattern of rapidly increasing risk factors before menopause appears to be more pronounced among African-American women.

As women go through menopause, doctors and other care providers can use this “teachable moment” to emphasize the importance of diet and exercise in reducing cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

As women go through menopause, doctors and other care providers can use this “teachable moment” to emphasize the importance of diet and exercise in reducing cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

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A minute of Secondhand Marijuana Smoke may Damage Blood Vessels according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Rats’ blood vessels took at least three times longer to recover function after only a minute of breathing secondhand marijuana smoke, compared to recovery after a minute of breathing secondhand tobacco smoke, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

When rats inhaled secondhand marijuana smoke for one minute, their arteries carried blood less efficiently for at least 90 minutes, whereas similar exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke caused blood vessel impairment that recovered within 30 minutes.

With many states legalizing medical and recreational marijuana, and possible corporate expansion within the cannabis industry, this type of research is important to help understand the health consequences of exposure to secondhand marijuana smoke, researchers said. (American Heart Association)

With many states legalizing medical and recreational marijuana, and possible corporate expansion within the cannabis industry, this type of research is important to help understand the health consequences of exposure to secondhand marijuana smoke, researchers said. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Post Coronary Artery Bypass Infections may be linked to severe Obesity

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXCoronary artery bypass patients who have severe obesity are more likely to experience infection shortly after surgery and stay in the hospital longer, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Compared to coronary artery bypass patients with normal weight, patients with severe obesity were three times more likely to develop an infection after bypass surgery, researchers said.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says a Woman’s Heart Attack Causes, Symptoms may differ from a Man’s

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A woman’s heart attack may have different underlying causes, symptoms and outcomes compared to men, and differences in risk factors and outcomes are further pronounced in black and Hispanic women, according to a scientific statement published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

The statement is the first scientific statement from the American Heart Association on heart attacks in women.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Clot-removal devices now recommended for some stroke patients

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For the first time, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association recommends using a stent retrieval device to remove blood clots in select stroke patients who have clots obstructing the large arteries supplying blood to the brain, according to a new focused update published in the American Heart Association journal Stroke.

The optimal initial treatment for a clot-caused (ischemic) stroke remains intravenous delivery of the clot-busting medication tissue plasminogen activator (tPA).

FAST Stroke infographic. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says poor response to Cholesterol Drugs may indicate blocked Arteries

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – If your “bad” cholesterol level stays the same or increases after you take statin drugs, you may have more blocked arteries than people whose levels drop, according to research in the American Heart Association journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology.

Low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is considered the “bad” cholesterol because it contributes to plaque buildup, thick, hard deposit that can clog arteries and make them less flexible. «Read the rest of this article»

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Tennessee Department of Health says the “Silent Killer” can be found by painless Three-Minute Test

 

Tennessee Department of Health - TDOHNashville, TN – If there were a painless three-minute test that could help you prevent blindness, heart attack, stroke, kidney failure or memory loss, would you have it?

Most would likely say yes, but unfortunately many don’t make time for a simple assessment to learn if they have high blood pressure. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Blood pressure control, lifestyle changes key to preventing subsequent Strokes

 

Saint Thomas and Vanderbilt support healthy lifestyle as key part of stroke prevention

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Stroke survivors should control their blood pressure, cholesterol and weight and do moderate physical activity regularly to avoid having another stroke, according to an American Heart Association/American Stroke Association scientific statement.

They should also receive other evidence-based therapy specific to their individual health, which may include aspirin therapy or a surgical procedure to keep neck arteries open.

Blood Pressure Check. (American Heart Association)

Blood Pressure Check. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says DNA particles in the Blood may help speed detection of Coronary Artery Disease

 

High blood levels of these DNA particles may eventually help identify patients at risk for further serious heart problems.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – DNA fragments in your blood may someday help doctors quickly learn if chest pain means you have narrowed heart arteries, according to a new study published in the American Heart Association journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

The study involved 282 patients, ages 34 to 83, who reported chest pain and were suspected of having coronary artery disease. Researchers used computed tomography imaging to look for hardened, or calcified, buildup in the blood vessels that supply the heart. Blood samples also were tested for bits of genetic material. Release of small DNA particles in the blood occurs during chronic inflammatory conditions such as coronary artery disease. «Read the rest of this article»

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