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Topic: Asia

NASA to use Spacecraft Orbiting Earth to track Air Pollution

 

Written by Steve Cole
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – For more than three decades NASA has focused its space-faring skills and science chops CSI-like on an elusive global killer. Later this month, that pursuit takes us to East Asia. In a few years, part way to the moon.

We are getting close.

Air pollution causes an estimated 152,000 deaths a year across the Americas and more than 2 million deaths in the Western Pacific, according to the United Nations. Some parts of the world have a detailed view of local air quality from ground sensor networks and forecast models that generate public alerts. But for much of the world this type of information and warning are not available.

Satellites have documented that human-produced and natural air pollution can travel a long way. This 2014 NASA satellite image shows a long river of dust from western Africa (bottom of image) push across the Atlantic Ocean. (NASA)

Satellites have documented that human-produced and natural air pollution can travel a long way. This 2014 NASA satellite image shows a long river of dust from western Africa (bottom of image) push across the Atlantic Ocean. (NASA)

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NASA Study finds Sea Level changes may be due to Climate Cycles

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – The tropical Pacific Ocean isn’t flat like a pond. Instead, it regularly has a high side and a low side. Natural cycles such as El Niño and La Niña events cause this sea level seesaw to tip back and forth, with the ocean near Asia on one end and the ocean near the Americas on the other.

But over the last 30 years, the seesaw’s wobbles have been more extreme, causing variations in sea levels up to three times higher than those observed in the previous 30 years. Why might this be?

Higher Pacific sea levels increase coastal flooding risks. (Flickr user Alan Grinberg, "Coming Ashore!", CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Higher Pacific sea levels increase coastal flooding risks. (Flickr user Alan Grinberg, “Coming Ashore!”, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

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AAA says Travel Concerns Push Vacation Prices Lower

 

AAA urges Americans to be informed when shaping 2016 travel plans

AAAKnoxville, TN – Media publicity regarding terrorism, the stock market, and now the Zika virus is weighing on the minds of travelers, many of whom are turning to AAA for advice on whether they should alter their vacation plans.

AAA always encourages Americans to be cautious when traveling the world, and to be aware of any health or security alerts before leaving. Although much has been made about the Zika virus, and travelers should stay informed, Federal health officials have not issued travel restrictions to those countries with active virus transmission.

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NASA uses Satellite data to create Damage Maps of Nepal’s Earthquake

 

Written by Elizabeth Landau
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Nepal’s magnitude 7.8 Gorkha earthquake caused significant damage and loss of life in 2015. In natural disasters like this, it is critical to locate areas that are in the most need of assistance as fast as possible.

Quickly assessing and communicating where the hardest-hit areas are and prioritizing which regions or communities have the greatest need for first-response teams is difficult when a disaster unevenly devastates various parts of a large area. It helps to get a bigger-picture view of where the damage is located from a high vantage point: low-Earth orbit.

This image shows street-level photos in the Bhaktapur area of Nepal overlaid on a damage proxy map derived from data from COSMO-SkyMed satellites. The color gradation -- yellow to orange to red -- represents increasingly more significant change on the ground. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Google/DigitalGlobe/CNES/Astrium/Amy MacDonald/Thornton Tomasetti)

This image shows street-level photos in the Bhaktapur area of Nepal overlaid on a damage proxy map derived from data from COSMO-SkyMed satellites. The color gradation — yellow to orange to red — represents increasingly more significant change on the ground. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Google/DigitalGlobe/CNES/Astrium/Amy MacDonald/Thornton Tomasetti)

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NASA reports a strong, growing El Niño head to United States

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – The current strong El Niño brewing in the Pacific Ocean shows no signs of waning, as seen in the latest satellite image from the U.S./European Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM)/Jason-2 mission.

El Niño 2015 has already created weather chaos around the world. Over the next few months, forecasters expect the United States to feel its impacts as well.

The latest Jason-2 image bears a striking resemblance to one from December 1997, by Jason-2’s predecessor, the NASA/Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES) Topex/Poseidon mission, during the last large El Niño event. Both reflect the classic pattern of a fully developed El Niño. The images can be viewed at:
http://sealevel.jpl.nasa.gov/elnino2015/index.html

The latest satellite image of Pacific sea surface heights from Jason-2 (left) differs slightly from one 18 years ago from Topex/Poseidon (right). In Dec. 1997, sea surface height was more intense and peaked in November. This year the area of high sea levels is less intense but considerably broader. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

The latest satellite image of Pacific sea surface heights from Jason-2 (left) differs slightly from one 18 years ago from Topex/Poseidon (right). In Dec. 1997, sea surface height was more intense and peaked in November. This year the area of high sea levels is less intense but considerably broader. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA studies how 2015 El Niño effects the World’s Climate

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – People the world over are feeling, or will soon feel, the effects of the strongest El Niño event since 1997-98, currently unfolding in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean. New NASA satellite observations are beginning to show scientists its impact on the distribution of rain, tropospheric ozone and wildfires around the globe.

New results presented Tuesday, December 15th, at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco show that atmospheric rivers, significant sources of rainfall, tend to intensify during El Niño events, and this year’s strong El Niño likely will bring more precipitation to California and some relief for the drought.

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Austin Peay State University Honors Film Series continues with “The Storm Makers”

 

Austin Peay State University - APSU - logoClarksville, TN – The Austin Peay State University Honors Program continues its Honors Film Series when it presents “The Storm Makers” on Monday, November 30th at 7:00pm in the Honors Commons classroom.

Set in Southeast Asia, “The Storm Makers” centers on a young Cambodian woman, Aya, who was sold into forced labor at age 16 in Malaysia. Beaten and sexual assaulted while in captivity, Aya returns home, still poor, but with a child.

Austin Peay State University to show the file “The Storm Makers” at the APSU Honors Commons Monday, November 20th. (APSU)

Austin Peay State University to show the file “The Storm Makers” at the APSU Honors Commons Monday, November 20th. (APSU)

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Frazier Allen: Third quarter marked by mixed data and volatility

 

F&M Investment Services - Raymond James - Clarksville, TNClarksville, TN – Last quarter, many investors watched closely as the Greek debt drama played out on a global stage. Three months later, investors once again are warily watching how international economic conditions impact domestic markets.

Headwinds include worries over slower growth in Europe and Asia; the effects of lower commodity prices; uncertainty over the Federal Reserve’s rate tightening policy and timing; suppressed inflation; and the potential for a U.S. government shutdown either at the beginning of October or during early December.

Frazier Allen

Frazier Allen

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NASA answers questions about upcoming Supermoon/Lunar Eclipse

 

Written by Ashley Morrow
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – Coming soon for the first time in more than 30 years: you’ll be able to witness a supermoon in combination with a lunar eclipse.

Late on September 27th, 2015, in the U.S. and much of the world, a total lunar eclipse will mask the moon’s larger-than-life face for more than an hour.

But what is this behemoth of the night sky? Not a bird, not a plane, it’s a supermoon! Although this incarnation of the moon comes around only once every year, it’s not as mysterious as you might think.

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Austin Peay State University freshmen to read “Where Am I Wearing” for 2015 Peay Read

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – A few years ago, the journalist Kelsey Timmerman saw his favorite T-shirt on a growing mound of dirty clothes, and he noticed the tag said it was made in Honduras. For the next few minutes, he worked his way through the pile, wondering where the other garments came from.

“This question inspired the quest that took me around the globe,” Timmerman wrote in the prologue of his best-selling book, “Where Am I Wearing? A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Clothes.”

Journalist Kelsey Timmerman.

Journalist Kelsey Timmerman.

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