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Topic: Asia

NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 Satellite data used to make Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions Maps

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Scientists have produced the first global maps of human emissions of carbon dioxide ever made solely from satellite observations of the greenhouse gas.

The maps, based on data from NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellite and generated with a new data-processing technique, agree well with inventories of known carbon dioxide emissions.

No satellite before OCO-2 was capable of measuring carbon dioxide in fine enough detail to allow researchers to create maps of human emissions from the satellite data alone. Instead, earlier maps also incorporated estimates from economic data and modeling results.

Human carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel burning and other sources have been mapped from OCO-2's global dataset. Traffic and pollution, Cairo, Egypt. (World Bank/Kim Eun Yeul)

Human carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel burning and other sources have been mapped from OCO-2’s global dataset. Traffic and pollution, Cairo, Egypt. (World Bank/Kim Eun Yeul)

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Tennessee Department of Agriculture reports White County Quarantined For Emerald Ash Borer

 

The Tennessee Department of AgricultureNashville, TN – White County is the latest in Tennessee to be quarantined for an invasive pest targeting ash trees.

Officials have detected Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) in the eastern section of White County. An adult EAB beetle was recently captured in a trap near Old Railroad Grade Road. With this discovery, White County joins 48 other counties in quarantine with a prohibition on the movement of ash trees and ash tree products.

Emerald Ash Borer.

Emerald Ash Borer.

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Tennessee Department of Agriculture reports Marion County Quarantined for Emerald Ash Borer

 

The Tennessee Department of AgricultureNashville, TN – An infestation of Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has inched further across the state.

Officials have detected EAB in the Kimball area of Marion County, prompting a county-wide quarantine prohibiting the movement of ash trees and ash tree products.

This quarantine has now reached 48 counties in Tennessee. EAB is a destructive forest pest that was introduced from Asia into the United States in the 1990s.

Emerald Ash Borer.

Emerald Ash Borer.

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Fort Campbell Task Force Strike personnel orchestrate movement into Operation Inherent Resolve

 

Written by 1st Lt. Daniel Johnson
2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (AA) Public Affairs

2nd Brigade Combat Team - StrikeFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne Division

Asia – As the Soldiers of Task Force Strike arrive in theater as part of Operation Inherent Resolve on their way to many different locations throughout Iraq, personnel here ensure they get to where they need to go at the time they are supposed to.

Many of the liaisons here deployed early, arriving in the country weeks before other Soldiers to ensure that the conditions would be set for the task force’s arrival.

“I deployed about three weeks ago” said CW1 Issac German, Task Force Strike mobility warrant officer. “My duty is to get all the Strike personnel and equipment from Fort Campbell to their end location, wherever that may be.”

Two personnel from Task Force Strike practice proper Joint Service Lightweight Integrated Suit Technology (JSLIST) removal procedures at a training and logistical camp in southwest Asia, May 11, 2016. (1st Lt. Daniel I. Johnson)

Two personnel from Task Force Strike practice proper Joint Service Lightweight Integrated Suit Technology (JSLIST) removal procedures at a training and logistical camp in southwest Asia, May 11, 2016. (1st Lt. Daniel I. Johnson)

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NASA to use Spacecraft Orbiting Earth to track Air Pollution

 

Written by Steve Cole
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – For more than three decades NASA has focused its space-faring skills and science chops CSI-like on an elusive global killer. Later this month, that pursuit takes us to East Asia. In a few years, part way to the moon.

We are getting close.

Air pollution causes an estimated 152,000 deaths a year across the Americas and more than 2 million deaths in the Western Pacific, according to the United Nations. Some parts of the world have a detailed view of local air quality from ground sensor networks and forecast models that generate public alerts. But for much of the world this type of information and warning are not available.

Satellites have documented that human-produced and natural air pollution can travel a long way. This 2014 NASA satellite image shows a long river of dust from western Africa (bottom of image) push across the Atlantic Ocean. (NASA)

Satellites have documented that human-produced and natural air pollution can travel a long way. This 2014 NASA satellite image shows a long river of dust from western Africa (bottom of image) push across the Atlantic Ocean. (NASA)

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NASA Study finds Sea Level changes may be due to Climate Cycles

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – The tropical Pacific Ocean isn’t flat like a pond. Instead, it regularly has a high side and a low side. Natural cycles such as El Niño and La Niña events cause this sea level seesaw to tip back and forth, with the ocean near Asia on one end and the ocean near the Americas on the other.

But over the last 30 years, the seesaw’s wobbles have been more extreme, causing variations in sea levels up to three times higher than those observed in the previous 30 years. Why might this be?

Higher Pacific sea levels increase coastal flooding risks. (Flickr user Alan Grinberg, "Coming Ashore!", CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Higher Pacific sea levels increase coastal flooding risks. (Flickr user Alan Grinberg, “Coming Ashore!”, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

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AAA says Travel Concerns Push Vacation Prices Lower

 

AAA urges Americans to be informed when shaping 2016 travel plans

AAAKnoxville, TN – Media publicity regarding terrorism, the stock market, and now the Zika virus is weighing on the minds of travelers, many of whom are turning to AAA for advice on whether they should alter their vacation plans.

AAA always encourages Americans to be cautious when traveling the world, and to be aware of any health or security alerts before leaving. Although much has been made about the Zika virus, and travelers should stay informed, Federal health officials have not issued travel restrictions to those countries with active virus transmission.

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NASA uses Satellite data to create Damage Maps of Nepal’s Earthquake

 

Written by Elizabeth Landau
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Nepal’s magnitude 7.8 Gorkha earthquake caused significant damage and loss of life in 2015. In natural disasters like this, it is critical to locate areas that are in the most need of assistance as fast as possible.

Quickly assessing and communicating where the hardest-hit areas are and prioritizing which regions or communities have the greatest need for first-response teams is difficult when a disaster unevenly devastates various parts of a large area. It helps to get a bigger-picture view of where the damage is located from a high vantage point: low-Earth orbit.

This image shows street-level photos in the Bhaktapur area of Nepal overlaid on a damage proxy map derived from data from COSMO-SkyMed satellites. The color gradation -- yellow to orange to red -- represents increasingly more significant change on the ground. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Google/DigitalGlobe/CNES/Astrium/Amy MacDonald/Thornton Tomasetti)

This image shows street-level photos in the Bhaktapur area of Nepal overlaid on a damage proxy map derived from data from COSMO-SkyMed satellites. The color gradation — yellow to orange to red — represents increasingly more significant change on the ground. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Google/DigitalGlobe/CNES/Astrium/Amy MacDonald/Thornton Tomasetti)

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NASA reports a strong, growing El Niño head to United States

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – The current strong El Niño brewing in the Pacific Ocean shows no signs of waning, as seen in the latest satellite image from the U.S./European Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM)/Jason-2 mission.

El Niño 2015 has already created weather chaos around the world. Over the next few months, forecasters expect the United States to feel its impacts as well.

The latest Jason-2 image bears a striking resemblance to one from December 1997, by Jason-2’s predecessor, the NASA/Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES) Topex/Poseidon mission, during the last large El Niño event. Both reflect the classic pattern of a fully developed El Niño. The images can be viewed at:
http://sealevel.jpl.nasa.gov/elnino2015/index.html

The latest satellite image of Pacific sea surface heights from Jason-2 (left) differs slightly from one 18 years ago from Topex/Poseidon (right). In Dec. 1997, sea surface height was more intense and peaked in November. This year the area of high sea levels is less intense but considerably broader. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

The latest satellite image of Pacific sea surface heights from Jason-2 (left) differs slightly from one 18 years ago from Topex/Poseidon (right). In Dec. 1997, sea surface height was more intense and peaked in November. This year the area of high sea levels is less intense but considerably broader. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA studies how 2015 El Niño effects the World’s Climate

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – People the world over are feeling, or will soon feel, the effects of the strongest El Niño event since 1997-98, currently unfolding in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean. New NASA satellite observations are beginning to show scientists its impact on the distribution of rain, tropospheric ozone and wildfires around the globe.

New results presented Tuesday, December 15th, at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco show that atmospheric rivers, significant sources of rainfall, tend to intensify during El Niño events, and this year’s strong El Niño likely will bring more precipitation to California and some relief for the drought.

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