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Topic: Atrial Fibrillation

American Heart Association says Irregular Heart Rhythm may affect Walking and Strength in older Adults

 

Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – When older people develop atrial fibrillation — the most common type of irregular heartbeat — it accelerates age-related declines in walking speed, strength, balance and other aspects of physical performance, according to new research in Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, an American Heart Association journal.

“Particularly in older adults, we need to be mindful that the effects of atrial fibrillation (AFib or AF) go beyond increasing the risk of heart failure and stroke. We learned from this study that older adults with AFib are especially vulnerable to losing strength, balance, gait speed and coordination,” said Jared W. Magnani, M.D., Ms.C., lead author of the study and assistant professor of medicine at Boston University.

When people over age 70 develop atrial fibrillation, the most common type of irregular heartbeat, it accelerates age-related declines in walking speed, strength, balance and other aspects of physical performance. (American Heart Association)

When people over age 70 develop atrial fibrillation, the most common type of irregular heartbeat, it accelerates age-related declines in walking speed, strength, balance and other aspects of physical performance. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association announces 2015 Top Heart Disease, Stroke Research

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association is featuring the top advances in heart disease and stroke research in 2015 in a series of stories (listed below) on Heart.org.

Each story was selected by a panel of the association’s science staff and volunteers. The organization has compiled an annual list of the major advances in heart disease and stroke research each year since 1996.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Women’s Heart Disease should be a Research Priority

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The latest gender-specific research on heart disease continues to show differences between women and men, yet gaps remain in how to best diagnose, treat and prevent this number one killer of women, according to studies published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

A portion of the March 2015 issue, published online ahead of print, is dedicated to research in women.

Nancy Brown; Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association

Nancy Brown; Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association

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American Stroke Association says Implanted Cardiac Monitor identifies Stroke risk better than traditional methods

 

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationSan Diego, CA – A cardiac monitor about the size of a USB flash drive that’s implanted under the skin was six to seven times more likely to detect atrial fibrillation, an abnormal heart rhythm that’s a risk factor for stroke, according to a science report presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2014.

The monitor could help identify the 30 percent of ischemic strokes with no apparent cause.  Ischemic strokes are caused by a clot in a blood vessel in or near the brain. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association sets first guidelines for reducing stroke risks unique to women

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For the first time, guidelines have been developed for preventing stroke in women.

“If you are a woman, you share many of the same risk factors for stroke with men, but your risk is also influenced by hormones, reproductive health, pregnancy, childbirth and other sex-related factors,” said Cheryl Bushnell, M.D., M.H.S., author of the new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Stroke.

Blood Pressure Check. (American Heart Association)

Blood Pressure Check. (American Heart Association)

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One in six people worldwide will have a stroke in their lifetime; World Stroke Day is October 29th

 

According to a new survey, people more likely to witness a stroke might not know how to identify one; free app helps people Spot a Stroke F.A.S.T.

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – Crystal Wall was having a typical chat on the phone with her sister Chassity Anderson — until her sister’s phone abruptly crashed to the floor and her words suddenly became slurred.

Anderson, 37, was having another stroke.

“Because my sister had suffered from stroke before, I recognized the warning signs and knew to call 9-1-1,” Wall said. “I know stroke is something that can happen to anyone at any time and if it does, you have to act quickly. The longer you wait, the worse it can be.” «Read the rest of this article»

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