Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Blood Pressure

American Heart Association says Golden Years are longer and healthier for those with Good Heart Health in Middle Age

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People with no major heart disease risk factors in middle age live longer and stay healthy far longer than others, according to a 40-year study reported in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Good cardiovascular health in middle age delays the onset of many types of disease so that people live longer and spend a much smaller proportion of their lives with chronic illness,” said Norrina Allen, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

A Healthy Heart in Middle Age Could Add Almost Four Years to Your Life After Age 65 and Save You $18,000 in Medicare Care Costs. Graphic shows these benefits for middle aged adults who don't smoke or have diabetes, maintain a normal weight, have good blood pressure and good cholesterol. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Energy drinks linked to more Heart, Blood Pressure changes than Caffeinated Drinks alone

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Drinking 32 ounces of a commercially available energy drink resulted in more profound changes in the heart’s electrical activity and blood pressure than drinking 32 ounces of a control drink with the same amount of caffeine – 320 milligrams (mg), according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

While the U.S. Food and Drug Administration generally considers caffeine in doses of less than 400 mg as safe, energy drinks often consist of not only caffeine but proprietary energy blends.

Two hours after drinking 32 ounces of a commercially available energy drink, the heart’s electrical activity was abnormal compared to drinking a caffeine-matched control drink.

Two hours after drinking 32 ounces of a commercially available energy drink, the heart’s electrical activity was abnormal compared to drinking a caffeine-matched control drink.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association wants you to check your Blood Pressure

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – As part of #CheckIt, the American Heart Association (AHA) ) – the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease –  wants people to check their own blood pressure by May 17th, World Hypertension Day, which is part of National High Blood Pressure Education Month.

Through World Hypertension Day, the American Heart Association is joining other organizations in striving to reach 25 million blood pressure checks globally (5 million in the U.S.). Also, participants are encouraged to log their action and learn about high blood pressure.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association warns Cardiovascular Disease Costs Will Exceed $1 Trillion by 2035

 

Nearly Half of Americans Will Develop Pre-existing CVD Conditions

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – A new study, released today by the American Heart Association, projects that by 2035, cardiovascular disease (CVD), the most costly and prevalent killer, if left unchecked, will place a crushing economic and health burden on the nation’s financial and health care systems.

According to the study, in the next two decades, the number of Americans with CVD will rise to 131.2 million – 45 percent of the total U.S. population – with costs expected to reach $1.1 trillion.

This is the American Heart Association's Salty Six Infographic highlighting six popular foods that can add high levels of sodium to your diet. They are bread and rolls, cold cuts, cured meat, pizza, poultry, soup, and sandwiches. (American Heart Association)

This is the American Heart Association’s Salty Six Infographic highlighting six popular foods that can add high levels of sodium to your diet. They are bread and rolls, cold cuts, cured meat, pizza, poultry, soup, and sandwiches. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Seven Heart-Healthy Habits could save billions in Medicare costs

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – More than $41 billion a year in Medicare costs could be saved if all beneficiaries achieved ideal levels for five to seven heart-healthy habits to reduce cardiovascular risk, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. 

At least $41 billion annually in Medicare costs could be saved if beneficiaries adopted five to seven of the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 healthy habits to reduce cardiovascular disease.

At least $41 billion annually in Medicare costs could be saved if beneficiaries adopted five to seven of the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 healthy habits to reduce cardiovascular disease.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Clinic Readings may underestimate Blood Pressure during Daily Activities

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

AAADallas, TX – Around the clock monitoring during daily activity revealed masked, or undetected, high blood pressure among otherwise healthy adults who had normal readings in the clinic, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

The reverse of “white coat hypertension” (higher blood pressure readings at the doctor’s office than outside the clinic setting), “masked hypertension” is normal blood pressure in the doctor’s office but high readings outside of the office.

Healthcare providers should be aware that normal blood-pressure tests in the clinic may not rule out high blood pressure among otherwise healthy patients. (American Heart Association)

Healthcare providers should be aware that normal blood-pressure tests in the clinic may not rule out high blood pressure among otherwise healthy patients. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Recreational, Commuter Biking linked to Lower Cardiovascular Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People who bike regularly, either for pleasure or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, according to two separate studies published simultaneously in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation and Journal of the American Heart Association, the AHA/ASA’s Open Access Journal.

While structured cycling as part of a formal workout routine is already known to guard against cardiovascular illness, little is known about the effects of habitual biking done for leisure or as a way to commute.

People who bike regularly, either recreationally or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular illness, according to studies conducted in Denmark and Sweden.

People who bike regularly, either recreationally or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular illness, according to studies conducted in Denmark and Sweden.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association says Common High Blood Pressure Medications affect mood disorders

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Four commonly prescribed blood pressure medications may impact mood disorders such as depression or bipolar disorder, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

In this first study, that compared four common classes of antihypertensive drugs and risk of mood disorders, two drugs were associated with an increased risk for mood disorders, while one appears to decrease mood disorder risk, according to Sandosh Padmanabhan, M.D., Ph.D., study author and Professor at the Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow in Glasgow, United Kingdom.

Antihypertensive medications affect not only blood pressure but also mood disorders, such as depression and bipolar disorder.

Antihypertensive medications affect not only blood pressure but also mood disorders, such as depression and bipolar disorder.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Emotional Upset and Heavy Exertion may trigger a Heart Attack according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Being angry, emotionally upset or engaging in heavy physical exertion may trigger a heart attack, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

In a large international study, researchers found an association (more than twice the risk) between anger or emotional upset and the onset of heart attack symptoms within one hour. The same was true for heavy physical exertion during the hour before their first heart attack.

Being angry or emotionally upset while engaging in heavy physical exertion appears to triple heart attack risk. (American Heart Association)

Being angry or emotionally upset while engaging in heavy physical exertion appears to triple heart attack risk. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Preterm Birth leads to Smaller Kidneys, Higher Blood Pressure in Adulthood

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report Abstract 134

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – Premature birth cuts short kidney development, resulting in smaller kidney size and higher blood pressure in adulthood, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension 2016 Scientific Sessions.

“Adults born preterm may not present with the ‘classical’ risk factors for heart disease, but they are at increased risk of hypertension and insulin resistance and certainly require regular medical follow-up,” said Anne Monique Nuyt, M.D., senior author of the study and head of the division of neonatology at the Sainte-Justine University Hospital and Research Center of the University of Montreal, Canada.

Being born extremely early leads to smaller kidneys and higher blood pressure in adulthood. (American Heart Association)

Being born extremely early leads to smaller kidneys and higher blood pressure in adulthood. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Page 1 of 1012345...»

  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On GooglePlusVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our Feed
  • Personal Controls

    Archives