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Topic: Blood Pressure

American Heart Association gives Seven Healthy Heart measures may reduce Heart Failure Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People scoring well on the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 checklist for a healthy heart are less likely to develop heart failure, a condition that reduces blood and oxygen flow to the body, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Heart Failure.

Life’s Simple 7 encompasses seven measures that people can use to rate their heart health and take steps to improve it. The measures are: manage blood pressure, control cholesterol, reduce blood sugar, get physically active, eat better, lose weight and stop smoking.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says new reversible drug shows early promise in preventing dangerous Clots

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new drug that protects against dangerous blood clots in patients undergoing procedures such as angioplasty to restore blood flow through the coronary arteries, appears safe, fast, and the effects are uniquely reversible, according to early testing described in the American Heart Association journal: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology.

Antiplatelet drugs currently available to patients carry an increased risk of bleeding.

A uniquely acting antiplatelet agent, PZ-128, appears to be safe and fast for preventing blood clots and its effects are reversible, reducing risk for excessive bleeding. (American Heart Association)

A uniquely acting antiplatelet agent, PZ-128, appears to be safe and fast for preventing blood clots and its effects are reversible, reducing risk for excessive bleeding. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says a few minutes of activity may cut Blood Pressure for people with Type 2 Diabetes

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – Just a few minutes of light activity for people who sit most of the day – a short stroll or some squats at your desk every thirty minutes – can lower blood pressure for people with Type 2 diabetes, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Researchers tracked blood pressure levels in 24 overweight and obese adults with Type 2 diabetes as they sat for eight hours. Participants either took 3-minute walking breaks averaging a speed about 2 miles per hour (mph) or did 3-minutes of simple resistance exercises every half-hour.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says National Health Associations issue call to prioritize Blood Pressure Control

 

Evidence shows uncontrolled high blood pressure contributes to major health issues; latest research supports lower blood pressure targets to improve heart health

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Two of the country’s preeminent health organizations, the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American Medical Association (AMA), today announced a new nationwide initiative aimed at addressing the growing burden of high blood pressure in the U.S.

Target: BP™ will support physicians and care teams in helping their patients with high blood pressure reach a blood pressure goal of lower than 140/90 mm Hg, based on current AHA guidelines.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says moving to a Walking Neighborhood is good for your Blood Pressure

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – People who moved from a neighborhood that required a vehicle to run errands to one that made walking-errands convenient were significantly less likely to have high blood pressure than people who moved from one low-walkability neighborhood to another low-walkability neighborhood, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

To determine a neighborhood’s walking friendliness, researchers used Walk Score®, which rates neighborhoods from 1 to 100 for accessibility by foot to stores, parks, schools and other destinations. “Walker’s Paradise” neighborhoods received a score of 90 or greater. Walk Score® is an open-access walkability index available at www.walkscore.com.

People walking in a park. (American Heart Association)

People walking in a park. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says the No. 1 Killer is Invisible to most Women

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – Even though heart disease and stroke are the No. 1 killer of women in the U.S., most women say they don’t have a personal connection to cardiovascular disease, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

A 2014 nationally representative survey of 1,011 adult women found that those who know another woman with heart disease are 25 percent more likely to be concerned about it for themselves and 19 percent more likely to bring up heart health with their doctors. The survey was developed and conducted by the Women’s Heart Alliance.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says with help from pharmacists, better blood pressure cost $22

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A pharmacist-physician collaborative effort to control blood pressure among a diverse group of patients was considered cost-effective, with a $22.00 price tag to increase the hypertension control rate by one percent, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

“Previous studies have demonstrated the cost-effectiveness of collaborative hypertension control programs. However, most lacked minority and low-income populations,” said Linnea Polgreen, Ph.D., lead researcher and an assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science at the University of Iowa.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Mobile Technology may help people improve Health Behaviors

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Smartphone applications and wearable sensors have the potential to help people make healthier lifestyle choices, but scientific evidence of mobile health technologies’ effectiveness for reducing risk factors for heart disease and stroke is limited, according to a scientific statement from the American Heart Association, published in the association’s journal Circulation.

The new statement reviewed the small body of published, peer-reviewed studies about the effectiveness of mobile health technologies (mHealth) for managing weight, increasing physical activity, quitting smoking and controlling high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

Vegetables at the market. (American Heart Association)

Vegetables at the market. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health encourages everyone to prevent Heart Attacks

 

Tennessee Department of Health - TDOHNashville, TN – The Tennessee Department of Health reminds everyone to make heart health a top priority during American Heart Month and throughout the year. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and the number one killer of women.

“Heart disease is something everyone should take very seriously, and there are many things we can do to reduce our risk,” said Carolyn Wester, MD, MPH, Deputy Medical Director for the TDH Division of Family Health and Wellness. “If you have symptoms of a heart attack, seek help immediately. Every second counts.”

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Top 10 Gifts your heart will love for American Heart Month

 

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – Want to make your heart all warm and happy? Start with this gift list.

February is American Heart Month. And it’s a good time for the American Heart Association’s list of Top 10 Gifts that you can give to your heart to make it healthy and very, very happy.

While heart disease remains the No. 1 killer of Americans and No. 1 killer in the world, it is 80% preventable through steps we can all take.

February is American Heart Month

February is American Heart Month

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