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Topic: Blood Pressure

American Heart Association gives Seven steps to keep your Brain Healthy from Childhood to Old Age

 

American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Presidential Advisory

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A healthy lifestyle benefits your brain as much as the rest of your body — and may lessen the risk of cognitive decline (a loss of the ability to think well) as you age, according to a new advisory from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Both the heart and brain need adequate blood flow, but in many people, blood vessels slowly become narrowed or blocked over the course of their life, a disease process known as atherosclerosis, the cause of many heart attacks and strokes.

Improving your health status with Life’s Simple 7 may reduce the risk of dementia caused by strokes, vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. (American Heart Association)

Improving your health status with Life’s Simple 7 may reduce the risk of dementia caused by strokes, vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. (American Heart Association)

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Young adults, especially men, fall behind in high blood pressure treatment and control

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Young adults, particularly men, lag behind middle-aged and older adults in awareness and treatment of high blood pressure, putting this population at an increased risk for heart attack and stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

High blood pressure is a leading risk factor for heart attack and stroke and is also a significant public health burden, costing the United States about $110 billion in direct and indirect costs in 2015, according to American Heart Association estimates.

Awareness, treatment and control of high blood pressure is significantly lower in young adults compared to middle-aged and older adults. (American Heart Association)

Awareness, treatment and control of high blood pressure is significantly lower in young adults compared to middle-aged and older adults. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Brain Activity may be predictor of Stress-Related Cardiovascular Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The brain may have a distinctive activity pattern during stressful events that predicts bodily reactions, such as rises in blood pressure that increase risk for cardiovascular disease, according to new proof-of-concept research in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The new research, the largest brain-imaging study of cardiovascular stress physiology to date, introduced a brain-based explanation of why stress might influence a person’s heart health.   

A pattern of brain activity that occurs during psychological stress may predict bodily reactions, such as surges in our blood pressure, that increase risk for cardiovascular disease. (American Heart Association)

A pattern of brain activity that occurs during psychological stress may predict bodily reactions, such as surges in our blood pressure, that increase risk for cardiovascular disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Air pollution linked to Cardiovascular Disease; Air Purifiers may lessen impact

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Exposure to high levels of air pollution increased stress hormone levels and negative metabolic changes in otherwise healthy, young adults in a recent study conducted in China. Air purifiers appeared to lessen the negative effects, according to new research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Researchers focused on fine particulate matter (PM2.5) – a component of air pollution emitted from vehicles, factories, power plants, fires and smoking – because many studies have suggested this type of major air pollutant might lead to cardiovascular and metabolic health consequences, according to Haidong Kan, M.D., Ph.D., study author and professor of environmental health sciences at Fudan University in Shanghai, China.

Negative effects of pollution exposure decreased after using indoor air purifiers over a 9-day period.

Negative effects of pollution exposure decreased after using indoor air purifiers over a 9-day period.

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American Heart Association says Disadvantaged Kids may be at higher risk for Heart Disease later in life

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children from socially and economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods appear more likely to have thicker carotid artery walls, which in adults may indicate higher risk for heart attack and stroke in later life, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The carotid arteries supply blood to the brain. An ultrasound test of the arteries’ inner layers, the intima and media, may detect the early development of atherosclerosis, or “hardening of the arteries,” which underlies the development of cardiovascular disease later in life.

Children from socially and economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods appear more likely to have thicker carotid artery walls, which in middle-aged and older adults has been associated with higher risk for heart attack and stroke. (American Heart Association)

Children from socially and economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods appear more likely to have thicker carotid artery walls, which in middle-aged and older adults has been associated with higher risk for heart attack and stroke. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Fluctuations in home-monitored Blood Pressure may raise Dementia risk

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Whether or not you have high blood pressure, your risk of dementia may be higher if your pressure varies a lot from day to day, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Home monitoring of blood pressure may be useful to assess the future risk of dementia,” said lead study author Tomoyuki Ohara, M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor of neuropsychiatry at the Graduate School of Medical Sciences at Kyushu University in Fukuoka City, Japan.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

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In spite of extraordinary progress, more needs to be done to save Women from Heart Disease, says American Heart Association CEO

 

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C.American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown and co-author of the study “Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs Regarding Cardiovascular Disease in Women” published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, issued the following comments:

“Cardiovascular diseases cause 1 in 3 deaths among women each year – more than all cancers combined. That’s why the American Heart Association first brought this critical issue to light through the creation of the Go Red For Women™ movement in 2004.”

Nancy Brown; Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association

Nancy Brown; Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association

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American Heart Association says Breastfeeding may reduce a Mother’s Heart Attack and Stroke Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Breastfeeding is not only healthy for babies, it may also reduce a mother’s risk of having a heart attack or stroke later in life, according to new research published in of the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Previous studies have suggested that mothers get short-term health benefits from breastfeeding, such as weight loss and lower cholesterol, blood pressure and glucose levels after pregnancy.

A study of Chinese women found that the longer a mother breastfeeds, the greater the cardiovascular health benefit appears to be. (American Heart Association)

A study of Chinese women found that the longer a mother breastfeeds, the greater the cardiovascular health benefit appears to be. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Smaller Dose combos of Blood Pressure Meds may be effective with fewer side effects

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Quarter-dose combinations of blood pressure lowering medications appear to be effective in treating hypertension and result in fewer side effects for patients than a single dose of one drug, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

“Widespread control of blood pressure is generally low, even in high-income countries. The largest global survey of hypertension patients showed 88 percent of those aware of hypertension are treated with medications, but only one in three were able to gain control of their blood pressure,” said Anthony Rodgers, M.B.Ch.B., Ph.D., study author and professor at The George Institute for Global Health, University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia.

Combinations of smaller doses of blood pressure medications may lower blood pressure with fewer side effects, compared to standard single medication doses.(American Heart Association)

Combinations of smaller doses of blood pressure medications may lower blood pressure with fewer side effects, compared to standard single medication doses. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Golden Years are longer and healthier for those with Good Heart Health in Middle Age

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People with no major heart disease risk factors in middle age live longer and stay healthy far longer than others, according to a 40-year study reported in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Good cardiovascular health in middle age delays the onset of many types of disease so that people live longer and spend a much smaller proportion of their lives with chronic illness,” said Norrina Allen, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

A Healthy Heart in Middle Age Could Add Almost Four Years to Your Life After Age 65 and Save You $18,000 in Medicare Care Costs. Graphic shows these benefits for middle aged adults who don't smoke or have diabetes, maintain a normal weight, have good blood pressure and good cholesterol. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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