Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Blood Pressure

American Heart Association says Blood Glucose Health is decreasing in Obese Adults; increasing risks for Type 2 Diabetes, Cardio Complications

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXBlood glucose health is deteriorating in obese adults, despite overall progress in lowering blood pressure and cholesterol levels, which may raise the risk of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers said their findings suggest that controlling weight in obese adults to reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes should be a public health priority. (American Heart Association)

Researchers said their findings suggest that controlling weight in obese adults to reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes should be a public health priority. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Magnesium may modestly Lower Blood Pressure

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Magnesium, an essential element in the human body, may modestly lower blood pressure, according to research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Magnesium is found in whole grains, beans, nuts and green leafy vegetables.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Many drugs can cause or worsen heart failure, cautions new statement from American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Commonly used medications and nutritional supplements may cause or worsen heart failure, according to the first scientific statement from the American Heart Association to provide guidance on avoiding drug-drug or drug-condition interactions for people with heart failure.

The statement provides comprehensive information about specific drugs and “natural” remedies that may have serious unintended consequences for heart failure patients.

Patients with heart failure should consult with a health professional before starting or stopping any medication. (American Heart Association)

Patients with heart failure should consult with a health professional before starting or stopping any medication. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association reports Men may face high lifetime risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – About one in every nine men will experience sudden cardiac death, most before age 70, as well as about one in 30 women, according to research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Sudden cardiac death claims up to 450,000 American lives each year, according to the study and most commonly occurs in people with no prior symptoms of cardiovascular disease.

One in nine men may be at higher risk of premature death due to sudden cardiac death – usually with no warning. One in 30 women may face the same risk. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Prehypertension during Pregnancy could lead to Cardiovascular Risks

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Pregnant women who experience persistent blood pressure elevations in the upper ranges of normal may be at high risk of developing metabolic syndrome and increased cardiovascular risk after giving birth, according to research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Pregnant women who experience even subtle blood pressure elevations in the upper ranges of what is considered “normal” blood pressure appear more likely to develop metabolic syndrome after giving birth. (American Heart Association)

Pregnant women who experience even subtle blood pressure elevations in the upper ranges of what is considered “normal” blood pressure appear more likely to develop metabolic syndrome after giving birth. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Household Air Pollution linked to Higher Risk of Heart Attacks, Death

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Long-term exposure to household air pollution from lighting, cooking or heating with fuels, such as kerosene or diesel, may increase the risk of heart attacks and death, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Burning cleaner fuels, such as natural gas, was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular deaths.

According to the World Health Organization, one-half of the world’s population lives in poverty and burns fuels for lighting, cooking and heating purposes.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Insufficient Sleep Cycle, especially for shift workers, may increase Heart Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The body’s involuntary processes may malfunction in shift workers and other chronically sleep-deprived people, and may lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Insufficient sleep and circadian rhythm (approximately 24-hour) disturbances both have been associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes but the cause is unclear.

Insufficient sleep and sleep-cycle disruption can impair the body’s rhythms and cardiovascular function, and may explain increased cardiovascular risks observed in shift workers. (American Heart Association)

Insufficient sleep and sleep-cycle disruption can impair the body’s rhythms and cardiovascular function, and may explain increased cardiovascular risks observed in shift workers. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association says Prevention is key to closing racial disparity gap in Stroke

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Forty-five year-old African-Americans are more likely to die of stroke than are whites, not because of differences in care, but because blacks are having more strokes, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s Journal Stroke.

Few studies have examined whether the elevated stroke rate in blacks explains why there are more stroke deaths.

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Around-the-clock monitoring may unmask hypertension in African-Americans according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Wearing an ambulatory blood pressure monitoring device that measures blood pressure around-the-clock may help identify African Americans who have masked or undetected high blood pressure outside of the doctor’s office, a tricky condition that can signal high blood pressure in the clinic down the road, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

The reverse of white coat hypertension (higher blood pressure readings at the doctor’s office than at home), masked hypertension is normal blood pressure in the doctor’s office but high readings outside of the office. Masked hypertension is easy to miss, and can occur during the day or night.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Blood Pressure over time may better predict Stroke, Death Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Knowing the path of a person’s blood pressure from middle age onward may help doctors better assess the health risks posed by high blood pressure and could lead to earlier interventions to prevent stroke and other diseases linked to high blood pressure, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

“We already know that high blood pressure is the biggest risk factor for stroke and that in people aged 50 to 75, it can change in a couple years’ time,” said M. Arfan Ikram, M.D., Ph.D, senior study author and associate professor of neuroepidemiology at Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Page 1 of 912345...»

Personal Controls

Archives