Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Blood Pressure

American Heart Association reports Clinic Readings may underestimate Blood Pressure during Daily Activities

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

AAADallas, TX – Around the clock monitoring during daily activity revealed masked, or undetected, high blood pressure among otherwise healthy adults who had normal readings in the clinic, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

The reverse of “white coat hypertension” (higher blood pressure readings at the doctor’s office than outside the clinic setting), “masked hypertension” is normal blood pressure in the doctor’s office but high readings outside of the office.

Healthcare providers should be aware that normal blood-pressure tests in the clinic may not rule out high blood pressure among otherwise healthy patients. (American Heart Association)

Healthcare providers should be aware that normal blood-pressure tests in the clinic may not rule out high blood pressure among otherwise healthy patients. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Recreational, Commuter Biking linked to Lower Cardiovascular Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People who bike regularly, either for pleasure or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, according to two separate studies published simultaneously in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation and Journal of the American Heart Association, the AHA/ASA’s Open Access Journal.

While structured cycling as part of a formal workout routine is already known to guard against cardiovascular illness, little is known about the effects of habitual biking done for leisure or as a way to commute.

People who bike regularly, either recreationally or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular illness, according to studies conducted in Denmark and Sweden.

People who bike regularly, either recreationally or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular illness, according to studies conducted in Denmark and Sweden.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Common High Blood Pressure Medications affect mood disorders

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Four commonly prescribed blood pressure medications may impact mood disorders such as depression or bipolar disorder, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

In this first study, that compared four common classes of antihypertensive drugs and risk of mood disorders, two drugs were associated with an increased risk for mood disorders, while one appears to decrease mood disorder risk, according to Sandosh Padmanabhan, M.D., Ph.D., study author and Professor at the Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow in Glasgow, United Kingdom.

Antihypertensive medications affect not only blood pressure but also mood disorders, such as depression and bipolar disorder.

Antihypertensive medications affect not only blood pressure but also mood disorders, such as depression and bipolar disorder.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Emotional Upset and Heavy Exertion may trigger a Heart Attack according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Being angry, emotionally upset or engaging in heavy physical exertion may trigger a heart attack, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

In a large international study, researchers found an association (more than twice the risk) between anger or emotional upset and the onset of heart attack symptoms within one hour. The same was true for heavy physical exertion during the hour before their first heart attack.

Being angry or emotionally upset while engaging in heavy physical exertion appears to triple heart attack risk. (American Heart Association)

Being angry or emotionally upset while engaging in heavy physical exertion appears to triple heart attack risk. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Preterm Birth leads to Smaller Kidneys, Higher Blood Pressure in Adulthood

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report Abstract 134

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – Premature birth cuts short kidney development, resulting in smaller kidney size and higher blood pressure in adulthood, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension 2016 Scientific Sessions.

“Adults born preterm may not present with the ‘classical’ risk factors for heart disease, but they are at increased risk of hypertension and insulin resistance and certainly require regular medical follow-up,” said Anne Monique Nuyt, M.D., senior author of the study and head of the division of neonatology at the Sainte-Justine University Hospital and Research Center of the University of Montreal, Canada.

Being born extremely early leads to smaller kidneys and higher blood pressure in adulthood. (American Heart Association)

Being born extremely early leads to smaller kidneys and higher blood pressure in adulthood. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Sound Therapy may balance brain signals to reduce Blood Pressure, Migraines

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report Abstracts P310, P602

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – A noninvasive neurotechnology, which uses sound to balance right- and left-side brain frequencies was associated with lowered blood pressure, improved heart rate variability, and reduced symptoms of migraine headaches, according to two small studies presented at the American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension 2016 Scientific Sessions.

The neurotechnology, called High-resolution, relational, resonance based, electroencephalic mirroring, or HIRREM® (Brain State Technologies, Scottsdale, Arizona), uses sensors placed on the scalp to measure brain electrical activity, and detect right/left imbalances, or hyperarousal, according to study author Hossam A. Shaltout, R.Ph., Ph.D., assistant professor in the Hypertension and Vascular Research Center at Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Spectrograph presenting brain electrical activity before HIRREM sessions. (Dr. Charles H. Tegeler, MD, Department of Neurology, Wake Forest School of Medicine)

Spectrograph presenting brain electrical activity before HIRREM sessions. (Dr. Charles H. Tegeler, MD, Department of Neurology, Wake Forest School of Medicine)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Lowering blood pressure’s top number could prevent 100,000-plus deaths a year according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report Abstract 241

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – More than 100,000 deaths could be prevented annually if adults with specific common risk factors for heart disease would engage in an intensive program to lower systolic blood pressure, the top number in your blood pressure reading, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension 2016 Scientific Sessions.

Researchers used the findings from the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT). which was  released in 2015.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association reports Children Score Low on Cardiovascular Health Measures

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Proactive strategies for promoting good heart health should begin at birth, yet most American children do not meet the American Heart Association’s definition of ideal childhood cardiovascular health, according to a new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

“Instead of taking a wait-and-see approach by treating disease later in adulthood, we should help children maintain the standards of ideal cardiovascular health that most children are born with,” said Julia Steinberger, M.D., M.S., lead author of the new statement, professor in pediatrics and director of pediatric cardiology at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

Most children are born with ideal cardiovascular health and promoting good heart health should begin at birth. (American Heart Association)

Most children are born with ideal cardiovascular health and promoting good heart health should begin at birth. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Blood Glucose Health is decreasing in Obese Adults; increasing risks for Type 2 Diabetes, Cardio Complications

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXBlood glucose health is deteriorating in obese adults, despite overall progress in lowering blood pressure and cholesterol levels, which may raise the risk of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers said their findings suggest that controlling weight in obese adults to reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes should be a public health priority. (American Heart Association)

Researchers said their findings suggest that controlling weight in obese adults to reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes should be a public health priority. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Magnesium may modestly Lower Blood Pressure

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Magnesium, an essential element in the human body, may modestly lower blood pressure, according to research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Magnesium is found in whole grains, beans, nuts and green leafy vegetables.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Page 1 of 1012345...»

  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On GooglePlusVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our Feed
  • Personal Controls

    Archives

      December 2016
      S M T W T F S
      « Nov    
       123
      45678910
      11121314151617
      18192021222324
      25262728293031