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Topic: Blood Pressure

American Heart Association says Household Air Pollution linked to Higher Risk of Heart Attacks, Death

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Long-term exposure to household air pollution from lighting, cooking or heating with fuels, such as kerosene or diesel, may increase the risk of heart attacks and death, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Burning cleaner fuels, such as natural gas, was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular deaths.

According to the World Health Organization, one-half of the world’s population lives in poverty and burns fuels for lighting, cooking and heating purposes.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Insufficient Sleep Cycle, especially for shift workers, may increase Heart Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The body’s involuntary processes may malfunction in shift workers and other chronically sleep-deprived people, and may lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Insufficient sleep and circadian rhythm (approximately 24-hour) disturbances both have been associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes but the cause is unclear.

Insufficient sleep and sleep-cycle disruption can impair the body’s rhythms and cardiovascular function, and may explain increased cardiovascular risks observed in shift workers. (American Heart Association)

Insufficient sleep and sleep-cycle disruption can impair the body’s rhythms and cardiovascular function, and may explain increased cardiovascular risks observed in shift workers. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Prevention is key to closing racial disparity gap in Stroke

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Forty-five year-old African-Americans are more likely to die of stroke than are whites, not because of differences in care, but because blacks are having more strokes, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s Journal Stroke.

Few studies have examined whether the elevated stroke rate in blacks explains why there are more stroke deaths.

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

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Around-the-clock monitoring may unmask hypertension in African-Americans according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Wearing an ambulatory blood pressure monitoring device that measures blood pressure around-the-clock may help identify African Americans who have masked or undetected high blood pressure outside of the doctor’s office, a tricky condition that can signal high blood pressure in the clinic down the road, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

The reverse of white coat hypertension (higher blood pressure readings at the doctor’s office than at home), masked hypertension is normal blood pressure in the doctor’s office but high readings outside of the office. Masked hypertension is easy to miss, and can occur during the day or night.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Blood Pressure over time may better predict Stroke, Death Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Knowing the path of a person’s blood pressure from middle age onward may help doctors better assess the health risks posed by high blood pressure and could lead to earlier interventions to prevent stroke and other diseases linked to high blood pressure, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

“We already know that high blood pressure is the biggest risk factor for stroke and that in people aged 50 to 75, it can change in a couple years’ time,” said M. Arfan Ikram, M.D., Ph.D, senior study author and associate professor of neuroepidemiology at Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Factors associated with good Heart Health may also protect Kidneys

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Achieving the American Heart Association’s definition of ideal cardiovascular health may also help prevent chronic kidney disease, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Life’s Simple 7 are the ideal cardiovascular health factors/goals that include healthy blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar, diet, body weight, enough physical activity and not smoking.

Casey M. Rebholz, PhD, MS, MPH; Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Fred Dubs/American Heart Association)

Casey M. Rebholz, PhD, MS, MPH; Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Fred Dubs/American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Organizations Support Core Quality Measures, With Reservations

 

Measures will streamline data collection for physicians, payers and patients; concerns remain about blood pressure targets

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C.  Quality measures announced today by the Core Quality Measures Collaborative represent a step forward in reducing paperwork and confusion while also allowing providers to focus on measures that impact patient outcomes, the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) said in support of implementation of the proposed cardiovascular measures.

But the groups expressed reservations about blood pressure targets included in the measures.

International Stroke Conference 2016 is Feb. 16th-19th in Los Angeles. (American Heart Association)

International Stroke Conference 2016 is Feb. 16th-19th in Los Angeles. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association gives Seven Healthy Heart measures may reduce Heart Failure Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People scoring well on the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 checklist for a healthy heart are less likely to develop heart failure, a condition that reduces blood and oxygen flow to the body, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Heart Failure.

Life’s Simple 7 encompasses seven measures that people can use to rate their heart health and take steps to improve it. The measures are: manage blood pressure, control cholesterol, reduce blood sugar, get physically active, eat better, lose weight and stop smoking.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says new reversible drug shows early promise in preventing dangerous Clots

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new drug that protects against dangerous blood clots in patients undergoing procedures such as angioplasty to restore blood flow through the coronary arteries, appears safe, fast, and the effects are uniquely reversible, according to early testing described in the American Heart Association journal: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology.

Antiplatelet drugs currently available to patients carry an increased risk of bleeding.

A uniquely acting antiplatelet agent, PZ-128, appears to be safe and fast for preventing blood clots and its effects are reversible, reducing risk for excessive bleeding. (American Heart Association)

A uniquely acting antiplatelet agent, PZ-128, appears to be safe and fast for preventing blood clots and its effects are reversible, reducing risk for excessive bleeding. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says a few minutes of activity may cut Blood Pressure for people with Type 2 Diabetes

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – Just a few minutes of light activity for people who sit most of the day – a short stroll or some squats at your desk every thirty minutes – can lower blood pressure for people with Type 2 diabetes, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Researchers tracked blood pressure levels in 24 overweight and obese adults with Type 2 diabetes as they sat for eight hours. Participants either took 3-minute walking breaks averaging a speed about 2 miles per hour (mph) or did 3-minutes of simple resistance exercises every half-hour.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

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