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Topic: Blood Sugar

American Heart Association reports Factors associated with good Heart Health may also protect Kidneys

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Achieving the American Heart Association’s definition of ideal cardiovascular health may also help prevent chronic kidney disease, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Life’s Simple 7 are the ideal cardiovascular health factors/goals that include healthy blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar, diet, body weight, enough physical activity and not smoking.

Casey M. Rebholz, PhD, MS, MPH; Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Fred Dubs/American Heart Association)

Casey M. Rebholz, PhD, MS, MPH; Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Fred Dubs/American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association gives Seven Healthy Heart measures may reduce Heart Failure Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People scoring well on the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 checklist for a healthy heart are less likely to develop heart failure, a condition that reduces blood and oxygen flow to the body, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Heart Failure.

Life’s Simple 7 encompasses seven measures that people can use to rate their heart health and take steps to improve it. The measures are: manage blood pressure, control cholesterol, reduce blood sugar, get physically active, eat better, lose weight and stop smoking.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Sex differences in Type 2 Diabetes affect Cardiovascular Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women with Type 2 diabetes are twice as likely to have coronary heart disease compared to men, and may also need more frequent and intense physical activity to lower their risk of having a heart attack or stroke, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement published in the association’s journal Circulation.

In the United States slightly more than nine percent of the population had diabetes in 2012, and the number of people with Type 2 diabetes is increasing at a rapid rate.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says short bursts of high-intensity exercise does more for Type 2 Diabetes

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – Short bursts of high-intensity exercise improved cholesterol, blood sugar and weight among Type 2 diabetes patients more than 30 minutes of sustained, lower-intensity exercise, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Researchers found that after three months of high-intensity exercise in 10-minute bursts done three times per day, five days a week, led to an average 0.82 percent decrease in three-month blood sugar patterns compared with just 0.25 percent among those who performed more sustained, lower-intensity exercise also five times per week.

Short bursts of high-intensity exercise improved cholesterol, blood sugar and weight among Type 2 diabetes patients more than 30 minutes of sustained, lower-intensity exercise. (American Heart Association)

Short bursts of high-intensity exercise improved cholesterol, blood sugar and weight among Type 2 diabetes patients more than 30 minutes of sustained, lower-intensity exercise.(American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Long-term benefits of popular Diets are less than evident

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Popular commercial diets can help you lose some weight in the short term, but keeping the weight off after the first year and the diet’s impact on heart health are unclear, according to a study published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

Nearly 70 percent of American adults are overweight or obese – and therefore at higher risk for health problems such as heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure and diabetes. Whether a diet will be effective is an important public health question. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association funding new research network aimed at preventing heart disease, stroke

 

Vanderbilt one of four major institutions in network

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Four major institutions are banding together in a new research network aimed at preventing heart disease and stroke, the two leading causes of death in the world.

The Strategically Focused Prevention Research Network Centers — funded by a $15 million grant from the American Heart Association — is designed to help people live longer, healthier lives. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says more than 10 percent of Heart Attack Patients may have undiagnosed Diabetes

 

American Heart AssociationBaltimore, MD – At least 10 percent of people who have a heart attack may have undiagnosed diabetes, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2014.

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American Heart Association say that Heart Health as Young Adult linked to mental function in Mid-Life

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX  – Being heart healthy as a young adult  may increase your chance of staying mentally sharp in mid-life, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

In a 25-year study on 3,381 people, 18- to 30-years-old, those with blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol levels slightly higher than the Association’s recommended guidelines, scored lower on cognitive function tests in their 40s and 50s. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says your eyes may hold clues to stroke risk

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Your eyes may be a window to your stroke risk.

In a study reported in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension, researchers said retinal imaging may someday help assess if you’re more likely to develop a stroke — the nation’s No. 4 killer and a leading cause of disability. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says breaking a sweat while exercising regularly may help reduce Stroke Risk

 

Stroke is also the 5th leading killer in Tennessee (about 3200 deaths per year).

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Breaking a sweat while working out regularly may reduce your risk of stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Stroke.

Regular activity seems to lower stroke risk by reducing blood pressure, weight and blood sugar.

People walking in a park. (American Heart Association)

People walking in a park. (American Heart Association)

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