Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Blood Vessel Disease

American Heart Association says Teen Childbirth linked to increased risk for Heart Disease

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXWomen who became first-time mothers as teens were significantly more likely than older mothers to have greater risks for heart and blood vessel disease later in life, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers found that women reporting a first birth before the age of 20 scored significantly higher on Framingham Risk Score — a measure commonly used to estimate the 10-year cardiovascular risk.

Women who become teen-age mothers may be significantly more likely to have greater risks for cardiovascular disease later in life than older mothers. (American Heart Association)

Women who become teen-age mothers may be significantly more likely to have greater risks for cardiovascular disease later in life than older mothers. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Meal planning, timing, may impact heart health according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Planning when to eat meals and snacks and not skipping breakfast, are patterns associated with healthier diets, which could reduce cardiovascular disease risk, according to a new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

The statement provides a snapshot of the current scientific evidence suggesting when and how often people eat may impact risk factors for heart attack, stroke, or other cardiac or blood vessel diseases.

Planning and timing meals and snacks, such as not skipping breakfast and allocating more calories earlier in the day, might help reduce cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

Planning and timing meals and snacks, such as not skipping breakfast and allocating more calories earlier in the day, might help reduce cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association says Violence linked to early signs of Blood Vessel Disease in Women

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPhoenix, AZ – Experiencing physical violence in adulthood may increase the risk of women developing heart and blood-vessel disease, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific Sessions.

“Both society and the healthcare sector need to be aware of the importance of exposure to violence and its impact, not only on social well-being, but also on women’s long-term health,” said Mario Flores, M.D., study lead author and research assistant at the National Institute of Public Health in Mexico City, Mexico.

Blood flow blocked in brain. (American Heart Association)

Blood flow blocked in brain. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Genetic “off switch” linked to increased risk factors for Heart Disease

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Risk of heart and blood vessel disease may increase when a particular gene is switched off, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Emerging Science Series Webinar.

Two known biomarkers are high blood levels of certain fats – low-density lipoproteins (“bad” cholesterol) and high triglycerides. Another recognized biomarker is a protein called adiponectin, which is made in fat tissue and helps regulate the process of turning food into energy. At low levels it is associated with increased disease risk. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Diet, ‘anti-aging’ supplements may help reverse blood vessel abnormality

 

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – A diet low in grains, beans and certain vegetables — combined with “anti-aging” supplements — improved blood vessel function, in a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 2013 Scientific Sessions.

The blood vessel abnormality, or endothelial dysfunction, occurs when cells lining the interior wall of blood vessels malfunction. It’s a serious condition that’s often one of the first signs of heart disease. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 



  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On GooglePlusVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Instagram
  • Personal Controls

    Archives