Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Boston MA

American Heart Association says a ten percent price change could prevent Heart Disease and Death

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPhoenix, AZ – A ten percent drop in price for healthy foods and a ten percent increase in the price of unhealthy foods could potentially prevent a significant number of people from dying from heart disease and stroke, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific 2016 meeting.

Decreasing the price of fruits, vegetables and grains by ten percent, while increasing the price of sugary drinks by ten percent, could prevent 515,000 deaths from cardiovascular disease over 20 years. (American Heart Association)

Decreasing the price of fruits, vegetables and grains by ten percent, while increasing the price of sugary drinks by ten percent, could prevent 515,000 deaths from cardiovascular disease over 20 years. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says recent Asthma may be linked with Abdominal Aneurysm Rupture

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Patients aged 50 and older with recent asthma activity were significantly more likely than non-asthmatics to experience abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture and sudden death, according to new research published in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, an American Heart Association journal.

The main artery in the body, called the aorta, carries blood to the whole body. When this vessel becomes weakened it can form a balloon-like bulge that may rupture and if left untreated can cause sudden death.

Asthma inhaler. (American Heart Association)

Asthma inhaler. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Eating Healthier Fats could reduce Heart Disease Deaths Worldwide

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Eating healthier fats could save more than a million people internationally from dying from heart disease, and the types of diet changes needed differ greatly between countries, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Worldwide, policymakers are focused on reducing saturated fats. Yet, we found there would be a much bigger impact on heart disease deaths if the priority was to increase the consumption of polyunsaturated fats as a replacement for saturated fats and refined carbohydrates, as well as to reduce trans fats,” said Dariush Mozaffarian, M.D., Dr.P.H., senior study author and dean of the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy in Boston.

Fats Infographic. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association reports Moderate Coffee Drinking may be linked to reduced risk of Death

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Drinking a second or third cup of coffee may do more than get you through a long day — it may also reduce your risk of death from heart disease and other illnesses.

In a study reported in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, people who regularly drank moderate amounts of coffee daily —less than 5 cups per day — experienced a lower risk of deaths from cardiovascular disease, neurological diseases, Type 2 diabetes and suicide.

Coffee being poured. (American Heart Association)

Coffee being poured. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports College Football Linemen face greater risk of Heart Problems

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – College freshmen who play football linemen positions may face a greater risk of specific heart problems than other players, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Session 2015.

Researchers analyzed the effect of playing American football on the heart in 87 college athletes from pre-season to post-season.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

NASA Awards prototype Robots to Two University’s for Research and Development

 

Written by Gina Anderson
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Humanoid robots will be helpful to astronauts on our journey to Mars, so NASA has awarded prototypes to two universities for advanced research and development work.

NASA is interested in humanoid robots because they can help or even take the place of astronauts working in extreme space environments. Robots, like NASA’s R5, could be used in future NASA missions either as precursor robots performing mission tasks before humans arrive or as human-assistive robots actively collaborating with the human crew.

NASA’s R5 robot, which is NASA's newest humanoid robot and was built to compete in the DARPA Robotics Challenge. Image released Dec. 12, 2013. (NASA)

NASA’s R5 robot, which is NASA’s newest humanoid robot and was built to compete in the DARPA Robotics Challenge. Image released Dec. 12, 2013. (NASA)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

American Diabetes Association looks at 50 Years of Diabetes Research and Treatment

 

American Diabetes Association Boston, MA – From how people test their glucose levels to how long they can expect to live, almost everything has changed over the past 50 years for Americans with diabetes. A special symposium held at the American Diabetes Association’s 75th Scientific Sessions features a look back at what physicians and researchers have learned and how the lives of patients have changed during the past five decades.

“There are things that have happened over the past 50 years that clearly make life a lot better for people,” said Fred Whitehouse, MD, Division Head Emeritus at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, who has been treating people with diabetes for just as long. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association report shows Long-term Depression may Double Stroke Risk despite treatment

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Persistent depression may double the risk of stroke in adults over 50 — and stroke risk remains higher even after symptoms of depression go away, according to research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Our findings suggest that depression may increase stroke risk over the long term,” said Paola Gilsanz, Sc.D., study lead author and ‎Yerby Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, Mass.

Long-term depression may double the risk of stroke for middle-aged adults.

Long-term depression may double the risk of stroke for middle-aged adults.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Consumer Reports Poll reveals Overwhelming Majority of Doctors Concerned About Use of Antibiotics in Healthy Livestock

 

Over 2,000 Medical Professionals Call on Trader Joe’s to Stop Selling Meat Raised on Antibiotics

Consumer ReportsYonkers, NY – The overwhelming majority of doctors— 93 percent—are concerned about the common meat industry practice of using antibiotics on healthy animals for growth promotion and disease prevention, according to a new poll released today by Consumer Reports.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and many other public health organizations have warned that the misuse of antibiotics on healthy livestock is making these medications less effective for treating disease in people. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Austin Peay State University to have Renowned Flutist William Bennett in concert, June 27th

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Classical music aficionados throughout the area mark June on their calendars each year, because that’s when flutist William Bennett, considered “the greatest living flute player in the world,” hosts a special concert on the Austin Peay State University campus.

This year, he’ll perform his transcription of the Violin Sonata in f minor by Felix Mendelssohn at 7:30pm, Friday, June 27th, in the Mabry Concert Hall.

Flutist William Bennett in concert at APSU on June 27th.

Flutist William Bennett in concert at APSU on June 27th.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Events | No Comments
 


Page 1 of 3123

Personal Controls

Archives

    July 2016
    S M T W T F S
    « Jun    
     12
    3456789
    10111213141516
    17181920212223
    24252627282930
    31