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City of Clarksville goes Google, chooses G Suite for workplace apps

 

City of Clarksville reaches for the power of the Cloud to improve productivity, reduce costs

City of Clarksville - Clarksville, TNClarksville, TN – Clarksville Government is going Google with a new set of tools that will help employees work together more efficiently and deliver better service to residents.

Clarksville Mayor Kim McMillan announced today that the City of Clarksville has chosen G Suite for Government as its provider of a comprehensive package of productivity applications that includes email, documents, calendaring and scheduling, instant messaging, video sharing and conferencing, and unlimited cloud-based data storage.

Clarksville Mayor Kim McMillan and Maura Sullivan, chief operating officer for the City of Chattanooga, conduct a live video chat, or “Hangout,” to demonstrate some one of the capabilities of G Suite. The City of Clarksville announced Tuesday that it had “gone Google’ and chosen G Suite to provide of a comprehensive package of workplace productivity applications. Sullivan said Chattanooga started using G Suite a year ago and has been pleased with the results.

Clarksville Mayor Kim McMillan and Maura Sullivan, chief operating officer for the City of Chattanooga, conduct a live video chat, or “Hangout,” to demonstrate some one of the capabilities of G Suite. The City of Clarksville announced Tuesday that it had “gone Google’ and chosen G Suite to provide of a comprehensive package of workplace productivity applications. Sullivan said Chattanooga started using G Suite a year ago and has been pleased with the results.

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Major League Baseball Hall of Famer Rod Carew comes out swinging against Heart Disease

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Major League Baseball Hall of Famer Rod Carew knows he is lucky to be alive. Last fall, a heart attack, cardiac arrest and heart failure left him with a weakened heart and with a machine keeping blood pumping through his body.

It also left him with a mission: help boost awareness and prevention of heart disease. His ordeal prompted him to connect with the American Heart Association, offering his story and his voice to the fight against the number one cause of all deaths. The result is the Heart of 29 campaign, named for the jersey number he wore throughout his legendary career.

Heart of 29 «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says a ten percent price change could prevent Heart Disease and Death

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPhoenix, AZ – A ten percent drop in price for healthy foods and a ten percent increase in the price of unhealthy foods could potentially prevent a significant number of people from dying from heart disease and stroke, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific 2016 meeting.

Decreasing the price of fruits, vegetables and grains by ten percent, while increasing the price of sugary drinks by ten percent, could prevent 515,000 deaths from cardiovascular disease over 20 years. (American Heart Association)

Decreasing the price of fruits, vegetables and grains by ten percent, while increasing the price of sugary drinks by ten percent, could prevent 515,000 deaths from cardiovascular disease over 20 years. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says recent Asthma may be linked with Abdominal Aneurysm Rupture

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Patients aged 50 and older with recent asthma activity were significantly more likely than non-asthmatics to experience abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture and sudden death, according to new research published in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, an American Heart Association journal.

The main artery in the body, called the aorta, carries blood to the whole body. When this vessel becomes weakened it can form a balloon-like bulge that may rupture and if left untreated can cause sudden death.

Asthma inhaler. (American Heart Association)

Asthma inhaler. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Eating Healthier Fats could reduce Heart Disease Deaths Worldwide

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Eating healthier fats could save more than a million people internationally from dying from heart disease, and the types of diet changes needed differ greatly between countries, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Worldwide, policymakers are focused on reducing saturated fats. Yet, we found there would be a much bigger impact on heart disease deaths if the priority was to increase the consumption of polyunsaturated fats as a replacement for saturated fats and refined carbohydrates, as well as to reduce trans fats,” said Dariush Mozaffarian, M.D., Dr.P.H., senior study author and dean of the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy in Boston.

Fats Infographic. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reports Moderate Coffee Drinking may be linked to reduced risk of Death

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Drinking a second or third cup of coffee may do more than get you through a long day — it may also reduce your risk of death from heart disease and other illnesses.

In a study reported in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, people who regularly drank moderate amounts of coffee daily —less than 5 cups per day — experienced a lower risk of deaths from cardiovascular disease, neurological diseases, Type 2 diabetes and suicide.

Coffee being poured. (American Heart Association)

Coffee being poured. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports College Football Linemen face greater risk of Heart Problems

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – College freshmen who play football linemen positions may face a greater risk of specific heart problems than other players, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Session 2015.

Researchers analyzed the effect of playing American football on the heart in 87 college athletes from pre-season to post-season.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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NASA Awards prototype Robots to Two University’s for Research and Development

 

Written by Gina Anderson
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Humanoid robots will be helpful to astronauts on our journey to Mars, so NASA has awarded prototypes to two universities for advanced research and development work.

NASA is interested in humanoid robots because they can help or even take the place of astronauts working in extreme space environments. Robots, like NASA’s R5, could be used in future NASA missions either as precursor robots performing mission tasks before humans arrive or as human-assistive robots actively collaborating with the human crew.

NASA’s R5 robot, which is NASA's newest humanoid robot and was built to compete in the DARPA Robotics Challenge. Image released Dec. 12, 2013. (NASA)

NASA’s R5 robot, which is NASA’s newest humanoid robot and was built to compete in the DARPA Robotics Challenge. Image released Dec. 12, 2013. (NASA)

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American Diabetes Association looks at 50 Years of Diabetes Research and Treatment

 

American Diabetes Association Boston, MA – From how people test their glucose levels to how long they can expect to live, almost everything has changed over the past 50 years for Americans with diabetes. A special symposium held at the American Diabetes Association’s 75th Scientific Sessions features a look back at what physicians and researchers have learned and how the lives of patients have changed during the past five decades.

“There are things that have happened over the past 50 years that clearly make life a lot better for people,” said Fred Whitehouse, MD, Division Head Emeritus at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, who has been treating people with diabetes for just as long. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association report shows Long-term Depression may Double Stroke Risk despite treatment

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Persistent depression may double the risk of stroke in adults over 50 — and stroke risk remains higher even after symptoms of depression go away, according to research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Our findings suggest that depression may increase stroke risk over the long term,” said Paola Gilsanz, Sc.D., study lead author and ‎Yerby Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, Mass.

Long-term depression may double the risk of stroke for middle-aged adults.

Long-term depression may double the risk of stroke for middle-aged adults.

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