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Topic: California

AAA says Gas Prices Drop for Nine Straight Days

 

AAATampa, FL – Gas prices have fallen for nine consecutive days, reaching today’s average of $2.33 per gallon.

Gasoline demand remains on track to set a new all-time high for the 2016 summer driving season, however, crude oil remains relatively less expensive than recent years which is contributing to direct savings at the pump.

Drivers are saving a nickel per gallon on the week, but are paying five cents per gallon more on the month.

National Average Gas Price Comparison, 2013-2016 «Read the rest of this article»

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AAA reports Average U.S. Gas Prices Climb to 2016 High

 

AAATampa, FL – The national average price of gas reached a new 2016 high over the weekend, and today’s average of $2.38 per gallon is the most expensive average since September 2015.

Gas prices have moved higher by two cents per gallon on the week and 16 cents per gallon on the month.

Although pump prices have increased for 28 of the past 33 days, consumers continue to benefit from yearly savings and prices are down 42 cents per gallon compared to a year ago.

National Average Gas Price Comparison, 2013-2016 «Read the rest of this article»

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Clarksville Students Seek Fun in the Lab Instead of Fun in the Sun

 

Written by Karin Fielder Weaver and Kelly C. Motes
Intellectually gifted teens are always on the lookout for extra challenges.

Nashville State Community CollegeNashville, TN – As most teenagers head to the pool for summer break, two of Nashville State Community College’s youngest students, Hannah Motes, age 15, and Sebastian Motes, age 13, are getting ready to head off to a summer full of academic camps following their completion of more than 30 college credits.

These academically talented dual-enrollment students recently made the news by finishing their first year at Nashville State Community College (NSCC). Hannah began attending NSCC in June 2015 at the age of 14. To date, she has completed 38 college credits, with a cumulative college GPA of 3.45.

(L to R) Hannah Motes and Sebastian Motes.

(L to R) Hannah Motes and Sebastian Motes.

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NASA’s Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer (PRISM) can observe Coastal Waters in detail never before possible

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – A coastal scene with deep blue seas and a coral reef is beautiful to look at, but if you try to record the scene with a camera or a scientific instrument, the results are almost always disappointing. Most cameras can’t “see” underwater objects in such scenes because they’re so dim and wash out the glaring seashore.

These problems don’t just ruin vacation photos. They’re a serious hindrance for scientists who need images of the coastline to study how these ecosystems are being affected by climate change, development and other hazards.

To the rescue: the new Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer, created at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. PRISM is an airborne instrument designed to observe hard-to-see coastal water phenomena.

PRISM was designed to focus on hard-to-see phenomena in difficult coastal light conditions. (Flickr user Ken Lund, CC BY-SA 2.0)

PRISM was designed to focus on hard-to-see phenomena in difficult coastal light conditions. (Flickr user Ken Lund, CC BY-SA 2.0)

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NASA studies Comet P/2016 BA14 as it passes by Earth

 

Written by DC Agle
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Astronomers were watching when comet P/2016 BA14 flew past Earth on March 22nd. At the time of its closest approach, the comet was about 2.2 million miles (3.5 million kilometers) away, making it the third closest comet flyby in recorded history (see “A ‘Tail’ of Two Comets”). Radar images from the flyby indicate that the comet is about 3,000 feet (1 kilometer) in diameter.

The scientists used the Goldstone Solar System Radar in California’s Mojave Desert to track the comet.

These radar images of comet P/2016 BA14 were taken on March 23, 2016, by scientists using an antenna of NASA's Deep Space Network at Goldstone, California. At the time, the comet was about 2.2 million miles (3.6 million kilometers) from Earth. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSSR)

These radar images of comet P/2016 BA14 were taken on March 23, 2016, by scientists using an antenna of NASA’s Deep Space Network at Goldstone, California. At the time, the comet was about 2.2 million miles (3.6 million kilometers) from Earth. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSSR)

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APSU’s Asanbe Diversity Symposium to have noted novelist Marnie Mueller speak March 24th

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – The path that Marnie Mueller would forge during her career was, in many ways, foreshadowed by the circumstances that led to the first moments of her life.

Born to Caucasian American parents during World War II, Mueller nonetheless was born behind the barbed wire fences of a Northern California segregation camp designed to keep Japanese Americans contained during the war effort.

Marnie Mueller to give lecture “The Color of Citizenship: The Impact of the Japanese American Internment During WWII—Then and Now” at APSU’s Asanbe Diversity Symposium, March 24th.

Marnie Mueller to give lecture “The Color of Citizenship: The Impact of the Japanese American Internment During WWII—Then and Now” at APSU’s Asanbe Diversity Symposium, March 24th.

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NASA Study finds Sea Level changes may be due to Climate Cycles

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – The tropical Pacific Ocean isn’t flat like a pond. Instead, it regularly has a high side and a low side. Natural cycles such as El Niño and La Niña events cause this sea level seesaw to tip back and forth, with the ocean near Asia on one end and the ocean near the Americas on the other.

But over the last 30 years, the seesaw’s wobbles have been more extreme, causing variations in sea levels up to three times higher than those observed in the previous 30 years. Why might this be?

Higher Pacific sea levels increase coastal flooding risks. (Flickr user Alan Grinberg, "Coming Ashore!", CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Higher Pacific sea levels increase coastal flooding risks. (Flickr user Alan Grinberg, “Coming Ashore!”, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

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A look at NASA’s Dawn spacecraft year of Orbiting dwarf planet Ceres

 

Written by Elizabeth Landau
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – One year ago, on March 6th, 2015, NASA’s Dawn spacecraft slid gently into orbit around Ceres, the largest body in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.  Since then, the spacecraft has delivered a wealth of images and other data that open an exciting new window to the previously unexplored dwarf planet.

“Ceres has defied our expectations and surprised us in many ways, thanks to a year’s worth of data from Dawn. We are hard at work on the mysteries the spacecraft has presented to us,” said Carol Raymond, deputy principal investigator for the mission, based at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.

The mysterious mountain Ahuna Mons is seen in this mosaic of images from NASA's Dawn spacecraft. Dawn took these images from its lowest-altitude orbit. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

The mysterious mountain Ahuna Mons is seen in this mosaic of images from NASA’s Dawn spacecraft. Dawn took these images from its lowest-altitude orbit. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

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NASA Study reveals Sierra Snow can be reduced by Atmospheric River Storms

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – A new study by NASA and several partners has found that in California’s Sierra Nevada, atmospheric river storms are two-and-a-half times more likely than other types of winter storms to result in destructive “rain-on-snow” events, where rain falls on existing snowpack, causing it to melt. Those events increase flood risks in winter and reduce water availability the following summer.

The study, based on NASA satellite and ground-based data from 1998 through 2014, is the first to establish a climatological connection between atmospheric river storms and rain-on-snow events. Partnering with NASA on the study were UCLA; Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego; and the Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado.

Rain falling on snow. (Flickr user Malcolm Peacey, CC BY-NC 2.0)

Rain falling on snow. (Flickr user Malcolm Peacey, CC BY-NC 2.0)

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NASA to evaluate Crew Safety in Orion Spacecraft using Test Dummies

 

Written by Sasha Ellis
NASA Langley Research Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Hampton, VA – Engineers at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, are preparing for a series of water-impact tests to evaluate the Orion spacecraft and crew safety when they return from deep-space missions and touch down on Earth’s surface.

After venturing thousands of miles beyond Earth, Orion will splash down in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California. At Langley, engineers are preparing to mimic various mission finale scenarios this year by dropping a mockup of Orion, coupled with the heat shield from the spacecraft’s first flight, into Langley’s 20-foot-deep Hydro Impact Basin.

NASA engineers install a male and female test dummy into a water landing Orion test article. Test dummies are used to collect data on the impact astronauts could experience when splashing down in the Pacific Ocean during a NASA space mission. (NASA/David C. Bowman)

NASA engineers install a male and female test dummy into a water landing Orion test article. Test dummies are used to collect data on the impact astronauts could experience when splashing down in the Pacific Ocean during a NASA space mission. (NASA/David C. Bowman)

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