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Topic: California

Salon 615: The Home (and Heart) of the Blues in Printers Alley

 

Sandee Gertz - Author/WriterNashville, TN – As you know by now from my columns, Printers Alley, where I live and write is literally the “home of the blues” as the famed Bourbon Street Blues and Boogie Bar is situated right in the heart of the bustling historic district of downtown off Church Street. And though there are a few regulars here who are declared (or claim) to be the “mayor of the alley,” only one man is king of the blues in these parts: Gil Gann, “the man.”

If you’ve walked through the alley only once, you’ve likely seen him in his signature performing regalia of top hat and black cotton matching shirt and pants—either putting out the signs for the club, sitting on the café chairs outside grabbing a smoke, or where he weaves his daily magic “on da porch” as they call the famed stage at Bourbon.

Gil Gann performing in Nashville.

Gil Gann performing in Nashville.

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NASA successfully launches Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 spacecraft from Vandenberg Air Force Base

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA successfully launched its first spacecraft dedicated to studying atmospheric carbon dioxide at 2:56am PDT (6:56am CDT) Wednesday.

The Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) raced skyward from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, on a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket. Approximately 56 minutes after the launch, the observatory separated from the rocket’s second stage into an initial 429-mile (690-kilometer) orbit.

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NASA set to launch Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 this morning July 1st, 2014

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) mission is scheduled to launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in central California tomorrow, July 1st, at 2:56am PDT (6:56am CDT).

OCO-2 — the first dedicated NASA mission to monitor atmospheric carbon dioxide on global scales — has only a 30-second launch window each day. The launch window is short because the spacecraft needs to be precisely aligned within a series of Earth-observing satellites known as the “A-Train.”

NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 gets ready for launch at Vandenberg Air Force Base in central California. The spacecraft is perched atop a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket, which will boost it to an orbit around Earth. (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 gets ready for launch at Vandenberg Air Force Base in central California. The spacecraft is perched atop a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket, which will boost it to an orbit around Earth. (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

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Rookie Skip Johnson wins Walmart FLW Tour Finale on Kentucky Lake presented by Evinrude

 

Tennessee’s Andy Morgan Wins Angler Of The Year Title, $100,000

FLWParis, TN – Rookie pro Skip Johnson of Goodells, MI, brought the fourth-largest stringer of the entire tournament to the scale Sunday – a five-bass limit weighing 24 pounds even – to win the Walmart FLW Tour at Kentucky Lake presented by Evinrude.

Johnson’s four-day total of 20 bass weighing 88 pounds, 10 ounces gave him the win by a narrow 1-pound, 2-ounce margin over second-place pro Jason Lambert of Pickwick Dam, Tennessee, and earned him the $100,000 prize in an exciting finale to the four-day event that wrapped up the 2014 Walmart FLW Tour regular season.

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NASA’s Carbon Observatory-2 satellite set for July 1st launch

 

Written by Dr. Tony Phillips
Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – In the lexicon of climate change, one word appears more often than any other: “carbon.” Carbon credits, carbon emissions, carbon sequestration…. These terms are on everyone’s lips.

The reason is carbon dioxide (CO2).

According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, CO2 is the most important driver of global warming. At approximately 400 parts per million, atmospheric carbon dioxide is now at its highest level in at least the past 800,000 years.

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NASA begins construction on 2016 Mars Lander, named InSight

 

Written by Guy Webster
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA and its international partners now have the go-ahead to begin construction on a new Mars lander, after it completed a successful Mission Critical Design Review on Friday.

NASA’s Interior Exploration Using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) mission will pierce beneath the Martian surface to study its interior. The mission will investigate how Earth-like planets formed and developed their layered inner structure of core, mantle and crust, and will collect information about those interior zones using instruments never before used on Mars.

This artist's concept depicts the stationary NASA Mars lander known by the acronym InSight at work studying the interior of Mars. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This artist’s concept depicts the stationary NASA Mars lander known by the acronym InSight at work studying the interior of Mars. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA estimates water and snowpack weight in California’s Sierra Nevada using GPS

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – For the first time, NASA scientists have used GPS to find the total weight of winter snowpack and soil moisture in California’s Sierra Nevada. The new results complement other satellite measurements and could provide a reality check for computer models used to estimate the state’s water and snowpack.

A team led by Donald Argus of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, studied data from 1,069 GPS research sites in California, Nevada, Oregon and Washington, extending back to 2006.

A GPS station in the mountains of Oregon. (Wikimedia Commons)

A GPS station in the mountains of Oregon. (Wikimedia Commons)

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NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory uses new Radar Instrument to montior Levees in California

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – One morning in 2008, research scientist Cathleen Jones of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA, was flying over the San Andreas fault near San Francisco, testing a new radar instrument built at JPL.

As the plane banked to make a turn, she looked down to see the Sacramento River delta, a patchwork of low-lying lands crisscrossed by levees.

Jones was using an instrument that can measure tiny movements of the ground on the scale of less than half an inch (less than a centimeter). It’s called the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR).

This 2004 levee break, caused by a burrowing beaver, did $90 million worth of damage. NASA's UAVSAR is monitoring levees for early signs of stress that could lead to failure. (Calif. DWR)

This 2004 levee break, caused by a burrowing beaver, did $90 million worth of damage. NASA’s UAVSAR is monitoring levees for early signs of stress that could lead to failure. (Calif. DWR)

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NASA creates 3D Image of Los Angeles Earthquake Zone

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – On March 28th, residents of Greater Los Angeles experienced the largest earthquake to strike the region since 2008. The magnitude 5.1 quake was centered near La Habra in northwestern Orange County about 21 miles (33 kilometers) east-southeast of Los Angeles, and was widely felt throughout Southern California.

There have been hundreds of aftershocks, including one of magnitude 4.1.

JPL scientists modeled the March 28, 2014 magnitude 5.1 quake near Los Angeles based on USGS seismic data. This model image shows how the quake may appear to airborne radar, such as NASA's UAVSAR, which will survey the area soon. Blue shades indicate the greatest surface displacement. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/USGS/Google Earth)

JPL scientists modeled the March 28, 2014 magnitude 5.1 quake near Los Angeles based on USGS seismic data. This model image shows how the quake may appear to airborne radar, such as NASA’s UAVSAR, which will survey the area soon. Blue shades indicate the greatest surface displacement. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/USGS/Google Earth)

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NASA looks into reducing the noise of a Sonic Boom for Supersonic Passenger Flight

 

Written by Frank Jennings, Jr.
NASA Glenn Research Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationCleveland, OH – Since the Concorde’s final landing at London’s Heathrow Airport nearly a decade ago, commercial supersonic air travel has been as elusive as a piece of lost luggage. However, this hasn’t stopped NASA from continuing the quest to develop solutions that will help get supersonic passenger travel off the ground once more.

And, while aerospace engineers have made significant progress in their understanding of supersonic flight, one significant challenge remains: the loud sonic boom.

This rendering shows The Boeing Company's future supersonic advanced concept featuring two engines above the fuselage.  (NASA/Boeing)

This rendering shows The Boeing Company’s future supersonic advanced concept featuring two engines above the fuselage. (NASA/Boeing)

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