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Topic: Canada

Former APSU Soccer player Tatiana Ariza, Colombian National Team claim silver medal at Pan Am Games

 

Austin Peay Sports Information

Austin Peay State University Lady Govs - APSUClarksville, TN – After a Round of 16 berth in the 2015 World Cup, former Austin Peay State University star Tatiana Ariza and the Colombian National Team continued its success at the Pan American Games in Toronto.

Former Austin Peay Soccer player Tatiana Ariza. (APSU Sports Information)

Former Austin Peay Soccer player Tatiana Ariza. (APSU Sports Information)

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Instant Peay Play: Former APSU Lady Govs soccer player Tatiana Ariza part of historic run at World Cup

 

Legends Bank, Clarksville TNClarksville, TN – Former Austin Peay State University women’s soccer standout Tatiana Ariza has been on the world’s biggest stage before, but this year at the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup she has helped the Columbia National women’s team to its deepest run in their history.

Ariza, who helped Austin Peay to 47 wins from 2010-13, has been on four World Cup level teams for Columbia, starting with their Under-17 and Under-20 teams and the past two national teams that qualified for one of the top 24 spots at the World Cup Tournament.

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Former APSU Soccer player Tatiana Ariza to make 2015 World Cup appearance for Colombia

 

Austin Peay Sports Information

Austin Peay State University Lady Govs - APSUClarksville, TN – As the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup kicks off in mere days, one former Austin Peay State University soccer star will compete against the best players on the planet.

Tatiana Ariza will be one of 23 names on the Colombian National Team squad making the trip to Canada, and will wear number 15.

Tatiana Ariza. (Michael Rios-Clarksville Sports Network)

Tatiana Ariza. (Michael Rios-Clarksville Sports Network)

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NASA’s prepares InSight Mars Lander for journey to Red Planet

 

Written by Guy Webster
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Testing is underway on NASA’s next mission on the journey to Mars, a stationary lander scheduled to launch in March 2016.

The lander is called InSight, an abbreviation for Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport. It is about the size of a car and will be the first mission devoted to understanding the interior structure of the Red Planet. Examining the planet’s deep interior could reveal clues about how all rocky planets, including Earth, formed and evolved.

The solar arrays on NASA's InSight lander are deployed in this test inside a clean room at Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver. This configuration is how the spacecraft will look on the surface of Mars. The image was taken on April 30, 2015. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Lockheed Martin)

The solar arrays on NASA’s InSight lander are deployed in this test inside a clean room at Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver. This configuration is how the spacecraft will look on the surface of Mars. The image was taken on April 30, 2015. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Lockheed Martin)

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APSU Lady Govs Soccer adds Pamela Peñaloza from Colombia to 2015 roster

 

Austin Peay Sports Information

Austin Peay State University Lady Govs - APSUClarksville, TN – Building on the Colombian pipeline, Austin Peay State University women’s soccer has received a National Letter of Intent signed by incoming freshman Pamela Peñaloza.

Peñaloza will join the Lady Govs in the fall after gaining experience in international soccer for her native country.

Austin Peay Soccer. (APSU Sports Information)

Austin Peay Soccer. (APSU Sports Information)

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APSU professor Edward Chester publish’s “Lifetime Work”, identifies state plants

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – In January 1967, while The Rolling Stones performed on The Ed Sullivan Show and a blizzard dropped 23 inches of snow across Chicago, a young Austin Peay State University botany professor began a project that would take him nearly 50 years to complete.

Dr. Edward Chester, his suit then smelling of chalkboard dust and his dark hair pomaded in the style of Jerry Lee Lewis, sat at his desk that winter to write a comprehensive guide identifying all of Tennessee’s 2,878 vascular plants.

Dr. Edward Chester served as a contributor and primary editor for the new textbook, “Guide to the Vascular Plants of Tennessee.” (Beth Liggett/APSU)

Dr. Edward Chester served as a contributor and primary editor for the new textbook, “Guide to the Vascular Plants of Tennessee.” (Beth Liggett/APSU)

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NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) gets ready to monitor soil’s freeze, thaw cycles

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Those who feel as though they’ve been living in the never-ending winter of the movie “Frozen” this year may be glad to hear that the spring thaw is now typically arriving up to two weeks earlier in the Northern Hemisphere than it did 20 to 30 years ago.

But the changing date of the spring thaw has consequences far beyond reducing the number of mornings when you have to scrape off your windshield.

One ecosystem where scientists would most like to understand the effects of changing freeze/thaw cycles is boreal forests, the great ring of green covering the land nearest the North Pole.

SMAP will monitor the frozen or thawed state of the global landscape north of 45 degrees north latitude. (UCAR/Carlye Calvin)

SMAP will monitor the frozen or thawed state of the global landscape north of 45 degrees north latitude. (UCAR/Carlye Calvin)

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NASA study shows Tropical Forests may remove more Carbon Dioxide from Atmosphere than expected

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – A new NASA-led study shows that tropical forests may be absorbing far more carbon dioxide than many scientists thought, in response to rising atmospheric levels of the greenhouse gas.

The study estimates that tropical forests absorb 1.4 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide out of a total global absorption of 2.5 billion — more than is absorbed by forests in Canada, Siberia and other northern regions, called boreal forests.

A new NASA study suggests that tropical forests, like this one in Malaysia, absorb more atmospheric carbon dioxide than is absorbed by forests in Alaska, Canada and Siberia. (Wikimedia Commons)

A new NASA study suggests that tropical forests, like this one in Malaysia, absorb more atmospheric carbon dioxide than is absorbed by forests in Alaska, Canada and Siberia. (Wikimedia Commons)

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NASA monitors Severe Holiday Weather from Space

 

Written by Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – Severe weather in the form of tornadoes is not something people expect on Christmas week but a storm system on December 23rd brought tornadoes to Mississippi, Georgia and Louisiana. As the storm moved, NASA’s RapidScat captured data on winds while NOAA’s GOES satellite tracked the movement of the system.

NASA’s RapidScat instrument flies aboard the International Space Station and captured a look at some of the high winds from the storms that brought severe weather to the U.S. Gulf Coast on December 23rd. In addition, an animation of images from NOAA’s GOES-East satellite showed the movement of those storms and other weather systems from Canada to South America from December 21st to 24th.

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NASA / NOAA’s GOES-East satellite provides image of United States in the grips of Bitter Cold Weather

 

Written by Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – As icy cold Canadian air settled over the eastern two-thirds of the U.S. bringing snow and bitter cold, NOAA’s GOES-East satellite captured this infrared view of what looks like a frozen blanket over the region.

NOAA’s GOES-East satellite provides visible and infrared images over the eastern U.S. and the Atlantic Ocean from its fixed orbit in space.

In an infrared image taken on November 18th at 12:30 UTC (7:30am EST), the cold air over the eastern and central U.S. appears to look like a blanket of white, but it’s not all snow.

In this NOAA's GOES satellite infrared image taken on November 18th at 7:30am EST, the cold air over the central and eastern U.S. appears to look like a blanket of white, but it's not all snow. (NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Dennis Chesters)

In this NOAA’s GOES satellite infrared image taken on November 18th at 7:30am EST, the cold air over the central and eastern U.S. appears to look like a blanket of white, but it’s not all snow. (NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Dennis Chesters)

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