Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Carbon Monoxide

Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office reports Smoke Inhalation More Dangerous than Burns in House Fires

 

Tennessee State Fire MarshalNashville, TN – The importance of smoke alarms has never been greater in the survivability of a house fire. Most fire fatalities are caused by smoke inhalation, not by burns.

As the toxicity and speed of smoke increases, the Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office (SFMO) is sharing tips on how you can keep your family safe from the toxic smoke and fumes produced by a home fire.

When a fire grows inside a building, it will deplete most of the available oxygen which slows the burning process.

Toxic Smoke Can Quickly Overcome Residents, Inhibiting Their Escape from a House Fire according to the Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office.

Toxic Smoke Can Quickly Overcome Residents, Inhibiting Their Escape from a House Fire according to the Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

NASA Researchers are creating Alien Atmospheres on Earth

 

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Researchers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, are cooking up an alien atmosphere right here on Earth. In a new study, JPL scientists used a high-temperature “oven” to heat a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide to more than 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit (1,100 Celsius), about the temperature of molten lava.

The aim was to simulate conditions that might be found in the atmospheres of a special class of exoplanets (planets outside our solar system) called “hot Jupiters.”

This artist's concept shows planet KELT-9b, an example of a "hot Jupiter," or a gas giant planet orbiting very close to its parent star. KELT-9b is an extreme example of a hot Jupiter, with dayside temperatures reaching 7,800 degrees Fahrenheit (4,300 Celcius). (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This artist’s concept shows planet KELT-9b, an example of a “hot Jupiter,” or a gas giant planet orbiting very close to its parent star. KELT-9b is an extreme example of a hot Jupiter, with dayside temperatures reaching 7,800 degrees Fahrenheit (4,300 Celcius). (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 


Final orbits of NASA’s Cassini Spacecraft produces new understanding of Saturn

 

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – New research emerging from the final orbits of NASA’s Cassini spacecraft represents a huge leap forward in our understanding of the Saturn system — especially the mysterious, never-before-explored region between the planet and its rings. Some preconceived ideas are turning out to be wrong while new questions are being raised.

Six teams of researchers are publishing their work October 5th in the journal Science, based on findings from Cassini’s Grand Finale. That’s when, as the spacecraft was running out of fuel, the mission team steered Cassini spectacularly close to Saturn in 22 orbits before deliberately vaporizing it in a final plunge into the atmosphere in September 2017.

Illustration: NASA's Cassini spacecraft in orbit around Saturn. (NASA/JPL-Caltech Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Illustration: NASA’s Cassini spacecraft in orbit around Saturn. (NASA/JPL-Caltech Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA looks for Water deep in Jupiter’s Atmosphere

 

Written by Lonnie Shekhtman
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – For centuries, scientists have worked to understand the makeup of Jupiter. It’s no wonder: this mysterious planet is the biggest one in our solar system by far, and chemically, the closest relative to the Sun. Understanding Jupiter is key to learning more about how our solar system formed, and even about how other solar systems develop.

But one critical question has bedeviled astronomers for generations: Is there water deep in Jupiter’s atmosphere, and if so, how much?

This visualization was created from images captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft, which has been studying Jupiter since it arrived there July 4th, 2016. (NASA/JPL/SwRI)

This visualization was created from images captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft, which has been studying Jupiter since it arrived there July 4th, 2016. (NASA/JPL/SwRI)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA’s Aqua satellite images show Carbon Monoxide from California Wildfires heading East

 

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – California is being plagued by massive wildfires, and the effects on air quality from those fires can extend far beyond the state’s borders. In addition to ash and smoke, fires release carbon monoxide into the atmosphere. Carbon monoxide is a pollutant that can persist in the atmosphere for about a month and can be transported great distances.

New images made with data acquired by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite show the high concentrations of carbon monoxide emitted from the fires (in orange/red) between July 29th and August 8th, 2018.

This animation shows concentrations of carbon monoxide (in orange/red) from California's massive wildfires drifting east across the U.S. between July 30 and August 7. It was produced using data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite. (NASA / JPL-Caltech)

This animation shows concentrations of carbon monoxide (in orange/red) from California’s massive wildfires drifting east across the U.S. between July 30 and August 7. It was produced using data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite. (NASA / JPL-Caltech)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

City of Clarksville to improve traffic flow on Wilma Rudolph Boulevard thanks to $1 million Federal Grant

 

City of Clarksville

City of Clarksville - Clarksville, TNClarksville, TN – Major traffic-flow improvements are coming to Clarksville’s heavily congested Wilma Rudolph Boulevard thanks to a nearly $1 million federal grant awarded to the City of Clarksville.

The Clarksville Street Department will use the money to design, purchase and implement an Adaptive Signal System on a 2.5-mile stretch of the boulevard from Alfred Thun Road north of Interstate 24 to the 101st Airborne Division Parkway.

Clarksville has received a $995,400 grant under the federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement  program to install a computerized traffic signal system on Wilma Rudolph Boulevard from I-24 to  the 101st Airborne Division Parkway.

Clarksville has received a $995,400 grant under the federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement program to install a computerized traffic signal system on Wilma Rudolph Boulevard from I-24 to the 101st Airborne Division Parkway.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


NASA using new Technology to observe Carbon in Earth’s Atmosphere

 

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – It’s a scientific conundrum with huge implications for our future: How will our planet react to the increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere?

That seemingly simple question is particularly tricky because carbon — an essential building block for life on Earth — does not stay in one place or take only one form. Carbon in its many forms, both from natural and human-caused sources, moves within and among the atmosphere, the ocean and land as our living planet breathes. To track and inventory carbon and unravel the many intricate processes that cause it to morph across the planet is an epic challenge.

And that’s where NASA comes in.

NASA's latest carbon-observing space mission is the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2, which is making unprecedented global measurements of carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere. (NASA-JPL/Caltech)

NASA’s latest carbon-observing space mission is the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2, which is making unprecedented global measurements of carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere. (NASA-JPL/Caltech)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

Tennessee State Fire Marshal states Most Home Fire Deaths Caused by Smoke, Not Flames

 

Tennessee State Fire MarshalNashville, TN – Home is the place people feel safest from fire, but it’s actually the place they’re at greatest risk. According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), approximately 80 percent of all U.S. fire deaths occur in the home. Most home fire fatalities, however, are not caused by burns, but by smoke inhalation.

To help prevent these tragedies, the Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office (SFMO) is reminding residents that the early detection capabilities of a working smoke alarm can mean the difference between life and death.

Most home fire fatalities are caused by smoke inhalation. A working smoke alarm can be a live safer.

Most home fire fatalities are caused by smoke inhalation. A working smoke alarm can be a live safer.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

NASA ends Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer instrument’s mission

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA’s Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – On January 31st, NASA ended the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer’s (TES) almost 14-year career of discovery. Launched in 2004 on NASA’s Aura spacecraft, TES was the first instrument designed to monitor ozone in the lowest layers of the atmosphere directly from space. Its high-resolution observations led to new measurements of atmospheric gases that have altered our understanding of the Earth system.

TES was planned for a five-year mission but far outlasted that term.

TES collected spectral "signatures," illustrated here, of ozone and other gases in the lower atmosphere. (NASA)

TES collected spectral “signatures,” illustrated here, of ozone and other gases in the lower atmosphere. (NASA)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA satellite instruments help detect, track Wildfires

 

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA’s satellite instruments are often the first to detect wildfires burning in remote regions, and the locations of new fires are sent directly to land managers worldwide within hours of the satellite overpass.

Together, NASA instruments, including a number built and managed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, detect actively burning fires, track the transport of smoke from fires, provide information for fire management, and map the extent of changes to ecosystems, based on the extent and severity of burn scars.

The concentration and global transport of carbon monoxide pollution from fires burning in Russia, Siberia and Canada is depicted in this NASA photo created with data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua spacecraft. (NASA)

The concentration and global transport of carbon monoxide pollution from fires burning in Russia, Siberia and Canada is depicted in this NASA photo created with data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA’s Aqua spacecraft. (NASA)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 



  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On GooglePlusVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Instagram
  • Personal Controls

    Archives