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Topic: Cardiovascular Disease

American Heart Association says Teen Childbirth linked to increased risk for Heart Disease

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXWomen who became first-time mothers as teens were significantly more likely than older mothers to have greater risks for heart and blood vessel disease later in life, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers found that women reporting a first birth before the age of 20 scored significantly higher on Framingham Risk Score — a measure commonly used to estimate the 10-year cardiovascular risk.

Women who become teen-age mothers may be significantly more likely to have greater risks for cardiovascular disease later in life than older mothers. (American Heart Association)

Women who become teen-age mothers may be significantly more likely to have greater risks for cardiovascular disease later in life than older mothers. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Less than half of Patients prescribed new Cholesterol Drug receive Insurance Approval

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Less than half of patients received their insurer’s approval for prescriptions of PCSK9 inhibitors, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

PCSK9 inhibitors, like Repatha (evolocumab) and Praluent (alirocumab), work by increasing the removal of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or “bad” cholesterol from the blood. They have been shown to reduce LDL by 60 percent and decrease major cardiac events but cost much more than other cholesterol-lowering drugs with an average cost of $14,300 per year. Prescriptions require prior authorization by health insurance companies.

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

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CDC reports Adult and Teen Obesity Rates hit all-time high

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate the adult obesity rates in the United States are now a staggering 40 percent while youth obesity rates grew to 20 percent for 12-to-19-year-olds.

An all-time high, these rates and the persistent disparities across different race-ethnicity groups further elevate public health concerns about how our nation can prevent and reduce obesity.

American Heart Association calls for transformative change to reverse trends in obesity. (American Heart Association)

American Heart Association calls for transformative change to reverse trends in obesity. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association releases New Music Video to raise awareness of Stroke Warning Signs

 

American Stroke Association launches a Y.M.C.A parody song to educate about stroke

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA), the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease and stroke, is releasing a new parody music video to teach people how to recognize the most common stroke warning signs.

Worldwide, stroke is the No. 2 cause of death and a leading cause of serious disability. For the American Stroke Association, raising awareness of stroke is more critical than ever, as new reports indicate that stroke deaths are on the rise.

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American Heart Association says Maintaining Healthy Weight helps keep Blood Pressure Low through Life

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationSan Francisco, CA – New research shows maintaining a healthy weight throughout life – more so than four other health behaviors studied – is important to help keep blood pressure in check, according to research presented today at the American Heart Association (AHA) Council on Hypertension, AHA Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions 2017 in San Francisco.

Maintaining a healthy weight is a key health behavior to prevent blood pressure increases from young adulthood into middle age.

Maintaining a healthy weight is a key health behavior to prevent blood pressure increases from young adulthood into middle age.

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Risk of heart disease in urban ‘food deserts’ is associated with individual’s income, rather than access to healthy food

 

Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The risk for developing cardiovascular disease is higher in individuals living in low income neighborhoods or with lower personal income regardless of their access to healthy food, according to new research published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

The study, conducted by Emory University School of Medicine, focused on the effects of income, education and socioeconomic status on healthy people living in urban food deserts in the Atlanta metropolitan area.

Cardiovascular disease risk is higher in people with low income or who live in low income neighborhoods regardless of their access to healthy food. (American Heart Association)

Cardiovascular disease risk is higher in people with low income or who live in low income neighborhoods regardless of their access to healthy food. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Brain Activity may be predictor of Stress-Related Cardiovascular Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The brain may have a distinctive activity pattern during stressful events that predicts bodily reactions, such as rises in blood pressure that increase risk for cardiovascular disease, according to new proof-of-concept research in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The new research, the largest brain-imaging study of cardiovascular stress physiology to date, introduced a brain-based explanation of why stress might influence a person’s heart health.   

A pattern of brain activity that occurs during psychological stress may predict bodily reactions, such as surges in our blood pressure, that increase risk for cardiovascular disease. (American Heart Association)

A pattern of brain activity that occurs during psychological stress may predict bodily reactions, such as surges in our blood pressure, that increase risk for cardiovascular disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Air pollution linked to Cardiovascular Disease; Air Purifiers may lessen impact

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Exposure to high levels of air pollution increased stress hormone levels and negative metabolic changes in otherwise healthy, young adults in a recent study conducted in China. Air purifiers appeared to lessen the negative effects, according to new research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Researchers focused on fine particulate matter (PM2.5) – a component of air pollution emitted from vehicles, factories, power plants, fires and smoking – because many studies have suggested this type of major air pollutant might lead to cardiovascular and metabolic health consequences, according to Haidong Kan, M.D., Ph.D., study author and professor of environmental health sciences at Fudan University in Shanghai, China.

Negative effects of pollution exposure decreased after using indoor air purifiers over a 9-day period.

Negative effects of pollution exposure decreased after using indoor air purifiers over a 9-day period.

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American Heart Association says Disadvantaged Kids may be at higher risk for Heart Disease later in life

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children from socially and economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods appear more likely to have thicker carotid artery walls, which in adults may indicate higher risk for heart attack and stroke in later life, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The carotid arteries supply blood to the brain. An ultrasound test of the arteries’ inner layers, the intima and media, may detect the early development of atherosclerosis, or “hardening of the arteries,” which underlies the development of cardiovascular disease later in life.

Children from socially and economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods appear more likely to have thicker carotid artery walls, which in middle-aged and older adults has been associated with higher risk for heart attack and stroke. (American Heart Association)

Children from socially and economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods appear more likely to have thicker carotid artery walls, which in middle-aged and older adults has been associated with higher risk for heart attack and stroke. (American Heart Association)

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American Stroke Association survey finds One in Three American Adults may have had Warning Stroke

 

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – About one in three American adults experienced a symptom consistent with a warning or “mini” stroke, but almost none – 3 percent – took the recommended action, according to a new survey from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA).

Thirty-five percent of respondents reported having experienced at least one sign of a warning stroke, called a transient ischemic attack or TIA. Those who did were more likely to wait, rest or take medicine than call 911, said the AHA/ASA, the nation’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular diseases and stroke.

F.A.S.T. infographic with stroke warning signs: Face drooping, Arm weakness, Speech difficulty, Time to call 9-1-1. Strokeassociation.org (American Heart Association)

F.A.S.T. infographic with stroke warning signs: Face drooping, Arm weakness, Speech difficulty, Time to call 9-1-1. Strokeassociation.org (American Heart Association)

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