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Topic: Cardiovascular Disease

American Heart Association says Genomic Medicine may one day revolutionize Cardiovascular Care

 

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new scientific statement from the American Heart Association summarizes the state-of-the-science of genomic medicine — the study of the health effects of the molecular interactions of a person’s unique genes — for studying cardiovascular traits and disorders and for therapeutic screening.

Genomic medicine could enable doctors to make predictions about people's health, from the likelihood of developing heart disease or stroke to the severity of disease, as well as medications for treatment. (American Heart Association)

Genomic medicine could enable doctors to make predictions about people’s health, from the likelihood of developing heart disease or stroke to the severity of disease, as well as medications for treatment. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Keep saying Yes to Fish twice a week for Heart Health

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new scientific advisory reaffirms the American Heart Association’s recommendation to eat fish- especially those rich in Omega-3 fatty acids twice a week to help reduce the risk of  heart failure, coronary heart disease, cardiac arrest and the most common type of stroke (ischemic). The advisory is published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

A new scientific advisory from the American Heart Association reaffirms the Association’s recommendation to eat two servings of fish per week. (American Heart Association)

A new scientific advisory from the American Heart Association reaffirms the Association’s recommendation to eat two servings of fish per week. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says In-Womb Air Pollution Exposure associated with Higher Blood Pressure in Childhood

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children who were exposed to higher levels of air pollution during the third trimester of their mother’s pregnancy had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Fine particulate matter of 2.5 microns or less (PM2.5) is a form of air pollution produced by motor vehicles and the burning of oil, coal and biomass, and has been shown to enter the circulatory system and negatively affect human health.

Children who were exposed to higher levels air pollution while in the womb had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood. (American Heart Association)

Children who were exposed to higher levels air pollution while in the womb had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says study found people would rather pop a pill or sip tea than exercise to treat High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report Presentation

American Heart AssociationArlington, VA – In a survey to assess treatment preferences for high blood pressure, respondents were more likely to choose a daily cup of tea or a pill over exercise, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in quality of care and outcomes research in cardiovascular disease and stroke for researchers, healthcare professionals and policymakers.

Survey respondents were more likely to choose a daily cup of tea or a pill over exercise to “treat” high blood pressure in an imaginary scenario, but many didn’t think the interventions were worth the benefits. (American Heart Association)

Survey respondents were more likely to choose a daily cup of tea or a pill over exercise to “treat” high blood pressure in an imaginary scenario, but many didn’t think the interventions were worth the benefits. (American Heart Association)

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Vegetables may help protect Elderly Women from hardening of Neck Arteries according to American Heart Association

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Elderly Australian women who ate more vegetables showed less carotid artery wall thickness, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Cruciferous vegetables including broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and Brussels sprouts proved the most beneficial.

Eating more cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower and broccoli was associated with less carotid artery wall thickness among elderly women. (American Heart Association)

Eating more cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower and broccoli was associated with less carotid artery wall thickness among elderly women. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Genetic Test may improve Post-Stent Treatment, Outcome

 

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Using genetic testing to inform which blood thinner to use following a procedure to open narrowed blood vessels resulted in significantly fewer complications among patients, according to new research in Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine, an American Heart Association journal.

In the United States, heart disease is the leading cause of death, and stroke is the fifth-leading cause. A major contributor to these cardiovascular diseases is clogged blood vessels (atherosclerosis), which result from the buildup of fatty deposits or plaque.

A test for specific genetic mutations successfully informed blood-thinner treatment selection following stent placement to open clogged blood vessels, leading to significantly fewer complications. (American Heart Association)

A test for specific genetic mutations successfully informed blood-thinner treatment selection following stent placement to open clogged blood vessels, leading to significantly fewer complications. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Heart Defects in Infant may predict Heart Problems in Birth Mother later in life

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women who give birth to infants with congenital heart defects may have an increased risk of cardiovascular hospitalizations later in life, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation. 

The study of more than one million women is the first to show congenital heart defects in newborns may be a marker for an increased risk of their mothers developing heart problems, including heart attack and heart failure, years after pregnancy.

Women who give birth to infants with congenital heart defects may be at increased risk of heart problems including heart attack and heart failure later in life. (American Heart Association)

Women who give birth to infants with congenital heart defects may be at increased risk of heart problems including heart attack and heart failure later in life. (American Heart Association)

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Mono-unsaturated fats from plants, not animals may reduce risk of death from heart disease and other causes

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Diets rich in mono-unsaturated fatty acids from plants were associated with a lower risk of dying from heart disease or other causes compared to diets rich in mono-unsaturated fats from animals, which were linked to a higher risk of death from heart disease or other causes, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

The largest reductions in the risk of death were found when healthy fats from plant sources replaced saturated fats, trans fats and refined carbohydrates. (Amnerican Heart Association)

The largest reductions in the risk of death were found when healthy fats from plant sources replaced saturated fats, trans fats and refined carbohydrates. (Amnerican Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Middle-aged Tooth loss linked to increased Coronary Heart Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Losing two or more teeth in middle age is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Having fewer natural teeth by middle age is linked to higher cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

Having fewer natural teeth by middle age is linked to higher cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Vegetarian and Mediterranean Diet may be equally effective in preventing Heart Disease

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, which includes eggs and dairy but excludes meat and fish, and a Mediterranean diet are likely equally effective in reducing the risk of heart disease and stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Previous separate studies have shown that a Mediterranean diet reduces certain risk factors for cardiovascular disease, as does a vegetarian diet; however, this was the first study to compare effects of the two distinct eating patterns.

Mediterranean Diet Foods: Vegetables, grains, and olive oil for a Mediterranean diet. (American Heart Association)

Mediterranean Diet Foods: Vegetables, grains, and olive oil for a Mediterranean diet. (American Heart Association)

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