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Topic: Cardiovascular Disease

American Heart Association announces National Wear Red Day this Friday, February 7th

 

Go Red for Women - American Red CrossNashville, TN – If you’re “seeing red” this week, it’s a good thing! Red is the color of the week and beyond, marking American Heart Month and the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement.

National Wear Red Day is this Friday, February 7th, a day when everyone wears red to support women’s fight against heart disease, their No. 1 killer. More women die of heart disease than all forms of cancer combined.  In Tennessee, about 9000 women die each year from cardiovascular disease. Yet up to 80% of cardiovascular disease is preventable through healthy living choices we make every day.

National Wear Red Day is this Friday

National Wear Red Day is this Friday

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American Heart Association says Exercising more, sitting less reduces heart failure risk in men

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Sitting for long periods increases heart failure risk in men, even for those who exercise regularly, according to new research published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Heart Failure.

Preventing heart failure, researchers found, requires a two-part behavioral approach: high levels of physical activity plus low levels of sedentary time. The study is the first to examine the link between heart failure risk and sedentary time, said Deborah Rohm Young, Ph.D., lead researcher and a senior scientist at Kaiser Permanente in Pasadena, CA. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reports Smokers who quit cut heart disease risk faster than previous estimates

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Cigarette smokers who are over 65 years of age may be able to lower their risk of cardiovascular disease-related deaths to the level of never-smokers when they quit faster than previously reported, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013.

A study showed that older people who smoked less than 32 “pack years” – 3.2 packs (20 cigarettes per pack) a day for no more than 10 years or less than one pack a day for 30 years  — and  gave up smoking 15 or fewer years ago lowered their risks of developing heart failure or dying from  heart failure, heart attacks and strokes to the same level as those who had never smoked.

Certain smokers who quit can reduce their risk of heart disease to the level of never-smokers sooner than previously thought.

Certain smokers who quit can reduce their risk of heart disease to the level of never-smokers sooner than previously thought.

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Healthcare Providers encouraged to aggressively treat unhealthy lifestyles

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX - Healthcare providers should treat unhealthy behaviors as aggressively as they treat high blood pressure, cholesterol and other heart disease risk factors, according to an American Heart Association science advisory published in Circulation.

“We’re talking about a paradigm shift from only treating biomarkers — physical indicators of a person’s risk for heart disease — to helping people change unhealthy behaviors, such as smoking, unhealthy body weight, poor diet quality and lack of physical activity,” said Bonnie Spring, Ph.D., lead author of the statement and a professor of preventive medicine and psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University in Chicago.

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Greater Nashville Heart Walk to impact Heart Health on October 12th

 

American Heart Association - Heart WalkNashville, TN – Someone has a heart attack every 34 seconds. Someone has a stroke every 40 seconds. Heart disease and stroke make a huge impact on the health of Middle Tennessee – but the upcoming Heart Walk aims to make an even bigger impact by fighting back against the no. 1 and no. 4 killers of Americans.

The American Heart Association’s Greater Nashville Heart Walk will bring together more than 12,000 walkers at Vanderbilt University on Saturday, October 12th, 2013, in one of the largest non-competitive walks in all of Tennessee. The event is free and open to all, but fundraising and donations are encouraged.

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American Heart Association’s Greater Nashville Heart Walk to take place October 12th

 

Team Signups going on now

American Heart Association - Greater NashvilleHeart WalkNashville, TN – It’s Heart Walk time! Three months from now, the Greater Nashville Heart Walk will take place at Vanderbilt University on Saturday, October 12th, 2013. Team registration is open, and teams are encouraged to sign up and set their fundraising goals at www.nashvilleheartwalk.org. There is no registration fee.

The annual event is the largest single fundraiser for the American Heart Association, and funds go to vital research, public health programs and community education about the no. 1 killer of Americans, cardiovascular disease.

Signups for the American Heart Association's Greater Nashville Heart Walk going on now.

Signups for the American Heart Association’s Greater Nashville Heart Walk going on now.

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American Heart Association says Institute of Medicine (IOM) report an incomplete review of Sodium’s Impact

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The American Heart Association says a new report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) — Sodium Intake in Populations: Assessment of Evidence — is incomplete in its assessment of sodium’s impact on health because it does not focus its examinations on scientific evidence that links excess consumption and high blood pressure.

The report found that though reducing sodium intakes from current levels is important, and that there is a positive relationship between higher levels of sodium intake and risk of heart disease, there is not enough evidence to conclude that sodium reduction below 2,300 mg daily leads to less heart disease, stroke and a reduced risk of death.

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says increases in Heart Disease risk factors may decrease Brain Function

 

Smoking and diabetes were especially linked with reduced brain function.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Brain function in adults as young as 35 may decline as their heart disease risk factors increase, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Stroke.

“Young adults may think the consequences of smoking or being overweight are years down the road, but they aren’t,”  said Hanneke Joosten, M.D., lead author and nephrology fellow at the University Medical Center in Groningen, The Netherlands. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reports Adults worldwide eat almost double daily AHA-recommended amount of sodium

 

The study is the first to provide information about sodium intake by country, age and gender.

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Seventy-five percent of the world’s population consumes nearly twice the daily recommended amount of sodium (salt), according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism and Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention 2013 Scientific Sessions.

Global sodium intake from commercially prepared food, table salt, salt and soy sauce added during cooking averaged nearly 4,000 mg a day in 2010.

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports 180,000 deaths worldwide may be associated with sugary soft drinks

 

About 25,000 deaths in the United States each year may be associated with sugar-sweetened drinks.

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Sugar-sweetened sodas, sports drinks and fruit drinks may be associated with about 180,000 deaths around the world each year, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism 2013 Scientific Sessions.

Sugar-sweetened beverages are consumed throughout the world, and contribute to excess body weight, which increases the risk of developing diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and some cancers.

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