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Topic: Cardiovascular Disease

American Heart Association reports Clinic Readings may underestimate Blood Pressure during Daily Activities

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

AAADallas, TX – Around the clock monitoring during daily activity revealed masked, or undetected, high blood pressure among otherwise healthy adults who had normal readings in the clinic, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

The reverse of “white coat hypertension” (higher blood pressure readings at the doctor’s office than outside the clinic setting), “masked hypertension” is normal blood pressure in the doctor’s office but high readings outside of the office.

Healthcare providers should be aware that normal blood-pressure tests in the clinic may not rule out high blood pressure among otherwise healthy patients. (American Heart Association)

Healthcare providers should be aware that normal blood-pressure tests in the clinic may not rule out high blood pressure among otherwise healthy patients. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports New Risk Assessment Tool May Better Predict Dynamic Risk of Heart Disease

 

The new tool is an extension of the ACC/AHA ASCVD Risk Estimator

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – A new assessment tool—the Million Hearts® Model Longitudinal ASCVD Risk Assessment tool—funded by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in partnership with the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association— is designed to help predict the 10-year risk of developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASVCD) and how that risk may change over time as preventive treatments are initiated.

The tool is an extension of the ASCVD Pooled Cohort Equation first published in the 2013 ACC/AHA Guideline on the Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Recreational, Commuter Biking linked to Lower Cardiovascular Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People who bike regularly, either for pleasure or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, according to two separate studies published simultaneously in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation and Journal of the American Heart Association, the AHA/ASA’s Open Access Journal.

While structured cycling as part of a formal workout routine is already known to guard against cardiovascular illness, little is known about the effects of habitual biking done for leisure or as a way to commute.

People who bike regularly, either recreationally or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular illness, according to studies conducted in Denmark and Sweden.

People who bike regularly, either recreationally or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular illness, according to studies conducted in Denmark and Sweden.

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American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology to Offer Hospital Cardiovascular Accreditation Services

 

Collaboration will support improvements in cardiovascular care and patient outcomes

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – U.S. hospitals and other institutions will have access to a single, comprehensive set of cardiovascular accreditation services through a new collaboration between the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA).

Starting in 2017, hospitals will be able to take advantage of a suite of co-branded accreditation services focused on all aspects of cardiac care, including chest pain, cardiac catheterization, atrial fibrillation, heart failure and other cardiovascular conditions.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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Air Pollution linked to Blood Vessel damage in Healthy Young Adults according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Fine particulate matter air pollution may be associated with blood vessel damage and inflammation among young, healthy adults, according to new research in Circulation Research, an American Heart Association journal.

“These results substantially expand our understanding about how air pollution contributes to cardiovascular disease by showing that exposure is associated with a cascade of adverse effects,” said C. Arden Pope, Ph.D., study lead author and Mary Lou Fulton Professor of Economics at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.

Traffic on the highway. (American Heart Association)

Traffic on the highway. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association establishes First AHA International Training Center in China

 

A remarkable milestone for future cooperation in the advancement of CPR training to reduce cardiovascular disease mortality

American Heart AssociationBeijing, China – At the 27th International Great Wall Conference on Cardiology, the American Heart Association (AHA) and the China Social Assistance Foundation (CSAF) held a signing ceremony to announce the establishment of the first AHA international training center in China with a primary focus on bystander response to cardiac arrest.

Leaders from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (MOST), local healthcare providers and heart health advocates attended and witnessed this historic moment, which marks a significant step forward in advancing CPR training and cardiovascular science sharing between the two countries.

At the 27th International Great Wall Conference on Cardiology, the American Heart Association (AHA) and the China Social Assistance Foundation (CSAF) held a signing ceremony to announce the establishment of the first AHA international training center in China with a primary focus on bystander response to cardiac arrest. (American Heart Association)

At the 27th International Great Wall Conference on Cardiology, the American Heart Association (AHA) and the China Social Assistance Foundation (CSAF) held a signing ceremony to announce the establishment of the first AHA international training center in China with a primary focus on bystander response to cardiac arrest. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association Publishes Policy Statement Advocating for Cardiac Emergency Response Plans in K-12

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Each year, approximately 7,000 children age 18 or younger experience cardiac arrest outside a hospital with survival rates of less than 10 percent. Immediate CPR can double or triple the chance of survival.

The American Heart Association – the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease – announced publication of a policy statement advocating for state laws requiring the implementation of cardiac emergency response plans (CERPs) in K-12 schools.

Only Four States Mandate School Planning for Cardiac Arrest Although 7,000 Children Annually Have Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests

Only Four States Mandate School Planning for Cardiac Arrest Although 7,000 Children Annually Have Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests

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American Heart Association Launches +color to Help Transform the American Diet

 

SUBWAY® Restaurants Joins the American Heart Association to Encourage All Americans To Add One More Cup of Color

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In a landmark nationwide effort, the American Heart Association (AHA) is announcing a new initiative called +color, focusing on the positive health impact of fruits and vegetables.

The health impact of +color may be simple yet significant: It is estimated that if Americans ate the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables every day, approximately 39,900 deaths would be prevented from cardiovascular diseases, stroke and diabetes and $7.6 billion in medical costs could be saved annually.[1],[2]

The American Heart Association (AHA) is announcing a new initiative called +color, focusing on the positive health impact of fruits and vegetables. (American Heart Association)

The American Heart Association (AHA) is announcing a new initiative called +color, focusing on the positive health impact of fruits and vegetables. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Smoking leaves historical “footprint” in DNA

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Smoking leaves its “footprint” on the human genome in the form of DNA methylation, a process by which cells control gene activity, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics, an American Heart Association journal.

The new findings suggest that DNA methylation could be an important sign that reveals an individual’s smoking history, and could provide researchers with potential targets for new therapies.

Smoking has a very broad, long-lasting impact on the human genome. (American Heart Association)

Smoking has a very broad, long-lasting impact on the human genome. (American Heart Association)

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Sleep disorders may influence heart disease risk factors says American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Sleep problems including sleeping too little or too long, may be linked to a variety of factors that may raise the risk for cardiovascular diseases, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

The first statement by the American Heart Association on sleep and heart health outlines what we currently know about sleep irregularities and cardiovascular-related risk factors, including obesity, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and atherosclerosis, arrhythmias, high blood pressure, stroke, unhealthy levels of triglycerides and cholesterol.

Research linking sleep problems to obesity and diabetes is robust, but longer studies measuring impact on actual weight are needed. (American Heart Association)

Research linking sleep problems to obesity and diabetes is robust, but longer studies measuring impact on actual weight are needed. (American Heart Association)

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