Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Cardiovascular Disease

American Heart Association says a ten percent price change could prevent Heart Disease and Death

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPhoenix, AZ – A ten percent drop in price for healthy foods and a ten percent increase in the price of unhealthy foods could potentially prevent a significant number of people from dying from heart disease and stroke, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific 2016 meeting.

Decreasing the price of fruits, vegetables and grains by ten percent, while increasing the price of sugary drinks by ten percent, could prevent 515,000 deaths from cardiovascular disease over 20 years. (American Heart Association)

Decreasing the price of fruits, vegetables and grains by ten percent, while increasing the price of sugary drinks by ten percent, could prevent 515,000 deaths from cardiovascular disease over 20 years. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Stroke Association reports Pregnancy in older age increases Stroke, Heart Attack risk years later

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationLos Angeles, CA – Women who become pregnant at age 40 or older face a greater risk of stroke and heart attack later in life than women who become pregnant at a younger age, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2016.

“We already knew that older women were more likely than younger women to experience health problems during their pregnancy,” said Adnan I. Qureshi, M.D., lead researcher and director of the Zeenat Qureshi Stroke Institute in St. Cloud, Minnesota. “Now, we know that the consequences of that later pregnancy stretch years into the future.”

Women pregnant at age 40 or older face a greater risk of stroke and heart attack later in life than those pregnant at a younger age. (American Heart Association)

Women pregnant at age 40 or older face a greater risk of stroke and heart attack later in life than those pregnant at a younger age. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Stroke Association reports number of Strokes increase as Pollution Levels Rise

 

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationLos Angeles, CA – Higher pollution levels were linked to a higher total number of strokes, and researchers said it reaffirmed the growing evidence that climate change and overall air quality contributes to cardiovascular disease, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2016.

The study, which used data from the United States and China, is one of the first to investigate the interaction between air quality and the number of stroke cases (prevalence) along with the potential effect of temperatures on the association.

Traffic on the highway. (American Heart Association)

Traffic on the highway. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association, IBM Watson Health and Welltok Team Up to Transform Heart Health

 

AHA to Infuse Cognitive Computing, Personalization and Science-Based Standards into New Workplace Health Offering

American Heart AssociationNew York City, NY – Today, the first day of American Heart Month, the American Heart Association (AHA) announced plans to develop a first of its kind workplace health solution that leverages the cognitive computing power of IBM Watson.

In the first application of Watson to cardiovascular disease, AHA, IBM, and Welltok will create a new offering that combines AHA’s science-based metrics and health assessments with cognitive analytics, delivered on Welltok’s health optimization platform.

CEORT Employee Health Infographic. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association Study shows Over 7 Million Americans With/At Risk for Cardiovascular Disease Insured under Affordable Care Act

 

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – A new study released today by the American Heart Association reveals that more than 6 million adults at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and 1.3 million who have suffered from heart disease, hypertension or stroke gained health insurance between 2013 and 2014, the first year coverage was available under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

“In just its first year of enrollment, the Affordable Care Act made it possible for millions of Americans fighting cardiovascular diseases to focus on improving their health, instead of worrying about whether they can obtain or afford the quality care they deserve,” said Nancy Brown, CEO of the American Heart Association.  «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association report shows Poor Sleep in Seniors linked to Hardened Brain Arteries

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Poor sleep quality in elderly persons is associated with more severe arteriosclerosis in the brain as well as a greater burden of oxygen-starved tissue (infarcts) in the brain – both of which can contribute to the risk of stroke and cognitive impairment. The findings are reported in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

The relationship between cardiovascular disease and so-called “fragmented” sleep has been studied in the past, but this is the first study to look specifically for an association between sleep fragmentation and detailed microscopic measures of blood vessel damage and infarcts in autopsied brain tissue from the same individuals.

Elderly people who sleep poorly and awaken frequently are more likely to have hardened blood vessels or oxygen-starved tissue in the brain. (American Heart Association)

Elderly people who sleep poorly and awaken frequently are more likely to have hardened blood vessels or oxygen-starved tissue in the brain. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Sugar-Sweetened Drinks linked to increased Visceral Fat

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages every day was associated with an increase in a particular type of body fat that may affect diabetes and heart disease risk, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Data from the Framingham Heart Study — federally supported, ongoing research that has advanced the understanding of cardiovascular disease — showed that among middle-aged adults, there was a direct correlation between greater sweetened beverage consumption and increased visceral fat.

Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages every day was associated with an increase in a particular type of body fat that may affect diabetes and heart disease risk.. (American Heart Association)

Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages every day was associated with an increase in a particular type of body fat that may affect diabetes and heart disease risk.. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


New statistics from American Heart Association shows one of every three U.S. Deaths caused by Cardiovascular Disease

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – One of every three deaths in the U.S. in 2013 were from heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases, while heart disease and stroke were the No. 1 and No. 2 killers worldwide, according to American Heart Association’s 2016 Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics Update. 

Produced since 1958, the update is created from the most-recent data available and compiled by the AHA, the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other government sources.

Brain Clot. (American Heart Association)

Brain Clot. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Sex differences in Type 2 Diabetes affect Cardiovascular Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women with Type 2 diabetes are twice as likely to have coronary heart disease compared to men, and may also need more frequent and intense physical activity to lower their risk of having a heart attack or stroke, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement published in the association’s journal Circulation.

In the United States slightly more than nine percent of the population had diabetes in 2012, and the number of people with Type 2 diabetes is increasing at a rapid rate.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Moderate Coffee Drinking may be linked to reduced risk of Death

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Drinking a second or third cup of coffee may do more than get you through a long day — it may also reduce your risk of death from heart disease and other illnesses.

In a study reported in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, people who regularly drank moderate amounts of coffee daily —less than 5 cups per day — experienced a lower risk of deaths from cardiovascular disease, neurological diseases, Type 2 diabetes and suicide.

Coffee being poured. (American Heart Association)

Coffee being poured. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Page 1 of 812345...»

Personal Controls

Archives

    May 2016
    S M T W T F S
    « Apr    
    1234567
    891011121314
    15161718192021
    22232425262728
    293031