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Topic: Cardiovascular Disease

Companies Nationwide Support Heart Health During American Heart Month Through Life Is Why We Give Fundraising Campaign

 

Funds Raised During February Support Local and National American Heart Association Initiatives

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In support of the American Heart Association’s mission to build healthier lives free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke, companies nationwide are participating in the American Heart Association’s Life Is Why We Give™ fundraising campaign.

Companies will offer customers the opportunity to donate to the American Heart Association when purchases are made instore or online and some will donate a percentage of the sale price of certain items back to the American Heart Association.

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Blacks, Hispanics less likely to achieve Blood Pressure Control according to American Heart Association

 

Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Blacks and Hispanics with high blood pressure are less likely than whites to get their condition under control, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

“High blood pressure is very common, and it is strongly linked to cardiovascular diseases like stroke, heart attack and heart failure,” said Edgar Argulian, M.D., M.P.H., senior study author and assistant professor of medicine and a cardiologist at Mt. Sinai St Luke’s Hospital in New York.

Lack of healthcare insurance and younger age increases the treatment and control gap between these minority groups and whites. (American Heart Association)

Lack of healthcare insurance and younger age increases the treatment and control gap between these minority groups and whites. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Heart Disease and Stroke continue to take a toll on lives

 

Statement from Nancy Brown, American Heart Association CEO

Predicted trend in increased Holiday Deaths Occurs

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Reports of sudden, unexpected deaths linked to heart disease and stroke command our daily news headlines, but seemingly even more so in these past few weeks. The untimely loss of so many deeply saddens us.

And it’s troubling to know that even though we have made massive strides in research toward treatment and cure, needless suffering and death from heart disease and stroke persist.

Cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading global cause of death. More than 17.3 million people die from heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases around the world each year.

CARDIAC ARREST occurs when the heart malfunctions and stops beating unexpectedly. Cardiac arrest is an "ELECTRICAL" problem. A HEART ATTACK occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked. A heart attack is a “CIRCULATION” problem. A blocked artery prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished by that artery begins to die. (American Heart Association)

CARDIAC ARREST occurs when the heart malfunctions and stops beating unexpectedly. Cardiac arrest is an “ELECTRICAL” problem. A HEART ATTACK occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked. A heart attack is a “CIRCULATION” problem. A blocked artery prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished by that artery begins to die. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says New Demo Will Help Remove Barriers to Cardiac Rehab

 

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – American Heart Association President Steven Houser, Ph.D., FAHA issued the following comments on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ (CMS) Medicare Program; Advancing Care Coordination Through Episode Payment Models (EPMs); Cardiac Rehabilitation Incentive Payment Model; and Changes to the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Model (CJR) final rule:

The treatment gap for CR and Intensive Cardiac Rehabilitation (ICR) is enormous. In 2013, only 20 percent of Medicare beneficiaries initiated cardiac rehabilitation. Rates were even lower for women and minorities. (American Heart Association)

The treatment gap for CR and Intensive Cardiac Rehabilitation (ICR) is enormous. In 2013, only 20 percent of Medicare beneficiaries initiated cardiac rehabilitation. Rates were even lower for women and minorities. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Medicare Should Compensate for Evidence-based Cardiovascular Disease Telehealth Services

 

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – A new policy statement issued today by the American Heart Association advocates that evidence-based telehealth services for heart disease and stroke should be covered by Medicare. The statement highlights the effectiveness of using telehealth to treat the 85 million Americans suffering from cardiovascular diseases (CVD).

Telehealth is defined as the use of telecommunications and information technologies to share information and provide clinical care, education, public health and administrative services at a distance.

CVD and stroke cost the U.S. health care system over $320 billion and $33 billion, respectively, each year.  (American Heart Association)

CVD and stroke cost the U.S. health care system over $320 billion and $33 billion, respectively, each year. (American Heart Association)

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Marital History linked to Stroke Survival according to American Heart Association

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People who were in a stable marriage, and had never been divorced or widowed, had the best prospects of survival after having a stroke, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

“Our research is the first to show that current and past marital experiences can have significant consequences for one’s prognosis after a stroke,” said Matthew E. Dupre, Ph.D., lead author and associate professor in the Department of Community and Family Medicine and the Duke Clinical Research Institute.

Human Brain Image. (American Heart Association)

Human Brain Image. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association Praises Surgeon General’s Call to Action on Youth E-Cigarette Use

 

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown issued the following comments today on the Surgeon General’s report, E-Cigarette Use Among Youth and Young Adults.” The report examines the growing use of these products by youth under the age of 25 in the U.S. and makes policy recommendations for how to fight this public health threat:

“The Surgeon General’s call to extinguish e-cigarette use among young Americans deserves high praise and fervent support.

Unlike tobacco products, e-cigarettes are not age-restricted. New Report Stresses Need to Address Public Health Threat.

Unlike tobacco products, e-cigarettes are not age-restricted. New Report Stresses Need to Address Public Health Threat.

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American Heart Association reports Clinic Readings may underestimate Blood Pressure during Daily Activities

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

AAADallas, TX – Around the clock monitoring during daily activity revealed masked, or undetected, high blood pressure among otherwise healthy adults who had normal readings in the clinic, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

The reverse of “white coat hypertension” (higher blood pressure readings at the doctor’s office than outside the clinic setting), “masked hypertension” is normal blood pressure in the doctor’s office but high readings outside of the office.

Healthcare providers should be aware that normal blood-pressure tests in the clinic may not rule out high blood pressure among otherwise healthy patients. (American Heart Association)

Healthcare providers should be aware that normal blood-pressure tests in the clinic may not rule out high blood pressure among otherwise healthy patients. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports New Risk Assessment Tool May Better Predict Dynamic Risk of Heart Disease

 

The new tool is an extension of the ACC/AHA ASCVD Risk Estimator

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – A new assessment tool—the Million Hearts® Model Longitudinal ASCVD Risk Assessment tool—funded by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in partnership with the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association— is designed to help predict the 10-year risk of developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASVCD) and how that risk may change over time as preventive treatments are initiated.

The tool is an extension of the ASCVD Pooled Cohort Equation first published in the 2013 ACC/AHA Guideline on the Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Recreational, Commuter Biking linked to Lower Cardiovascular Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People who bike regularly, either for pleasure or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, according to two separate studies published simultaneously in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation and Journal of the American Heart Association, the AHA/ASA’s Open Access Journal.

While structured cycling as part of a formal workout routine is already known to guard against cardiovascular illness, little is known about the effects of habitual biking done for leisure or as a way to commute.

People who bike regularly, either recreationally or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular illness, according to studies conducted in Denmark and Sweden.

People who bike regularly, either recreationally or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular illness, according to studies conducted in Denmark and Sweden.

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