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Topic: Cardiovascular Disease

Mono-unsaturated fats from plants, not animals may reduce risk of death from heart disease and other causes

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Diets rich in mono-unsaturated fatty acids from plants were associated with a lower risk of dying from heart disease or other causes compared to diets rich in mono-unsaturated fats from animals, which were linked to a higher risk of death from heart disease or other causes, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

The largest reductions in the risk of death were found when healthy fats from plant sources replaced saturated fats, trans fats and refined carbohydrates. (Amnerican Heart Association)

The largest reductions in the risk of death were found when healthy fats from plant sources replaced saturated fats, trans fats and refined carbohydrates. (Amnerican Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Middle-aged Tooth loss linked to increased Coronary Heart Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Losing two or more teeth in middle age is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Having fewer natural teeth by middle age is linked to higher cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

Having fewer natural teeth by middle age is linked to higher cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Vegetarian and Mediterranean Diet may be equally effective in preventing Heart Disease

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, which includes eggs and dairy but excludes meat and fish, and a Mediterranean diet are likely equally effective in reducing the risk of heart disease and stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Previous separate studies have shown that a Mediterranean diet reduces certain risk factors for cardiovascular disease, as does a vegetarian diet; however, this was the first study to compare effects of the two distinct eating patterns.

Mediterranean Diet Foods: Vegetables, grains, and olive oil for a Mediterranean diet. (American Heart Association)

Mediterranean Diet Foods: Vegetables, grains, and olive oil for a Mediterranean diet. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Targeting Pathway may reduce Cocaine’s Cardiovascular Harms

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Scientists have discovered a potential new pathway to treat the harmful effect of cocaine on the cardiovascular system, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Researchers found that excess levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), molecules known to be found in the aortas of hypertensive animals and humans, are also involved in cocaine-related cardiovascular disease.

Cocaine in mice increased levels of reactive oxygen species, molecules known to cause cardiovascular disease. (American Heart Association)

Cocaine in mice increased levels of reactive oxygen species, molecules known to cause cardiovascular disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Breast Cancer Treatments may increase the risk of Heart Disease

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Breast cancer patients may be at an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases including heart failure and may benefit from a treatment approach that weighs the benefits of specific therapies against potential damage to the heart, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association published in its journal Circulation.

The statement is an overview of what we currently know about risk factors common to both heart disease and breast cancer, the potential heart damage from some breast cancer treatments, and suggested strategies to prevent or minimize the damage.

Breast cancer survivors, especially older women, are more likely to die from cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure rather than breast cancer. (American Heart Association)

Breast cancer survivors, especially older women, are more likely to die from cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure rather than breast cancer. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Abuse and Adversity in Childhood linked to more Cardiovascular Risk in Adulthood

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children and teens who are abused, witness violence, are bullied or face other adversities are more likely to develop cardiovascular diseases in adulthood, according to a new scientific statement by the American Heart Association published in the Association’s journal Circulation.

The statement is based on a review of existing scientific research published in peer-reviewed medical journals that documents a strong association between adverse experiences in childhood and teen years and a greater likelihood of developing risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes earlier than those not experiencing adverse experiences.

Children and teens who experience abuse, bullying, neglect or witness violence and other forms of adversity are more likely to develop heart and blood vessel diseases as adults. (American Heart Association)

Children and teens who experience abuse, bullying, neglect or witness violence and other forms of adversity are more likely to develop heart and blood vessel diseases as adults. (American Heart Association)

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Sleep deprivation may increase risk of cardiovascular disease in older women

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Older women who don’t get enough sleep were more likely to have poor cardiovascular health, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

In the new study, researchers considered sleeping at least two hours more during the weekend than on the weekday as a sign of being in sleep debt.

Sleeping woman. (American Heart Association)

Sleeping woman. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Sudden Cardiac Death rates may be seven times higher among Young People with Diabetes

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Children and young adults with diabetes may be seven times more likely to die from sudden cardiac death compared to children and young adults without diabetes, according to preliminary research from Denmark presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Sudden cardiac death is defined as a sudden, unexpected death that occurs instantly or shortly after symptoms appear.

Children and young adults with diabetes were seven times more likely to die from sudden cardiac death compared to children and young adults without diabetes in a Danish study. (American Heart Association)

Children and young adults with diabetes were seven times more likely to die from sudden cardiac death compared to children and young adults without diabetes in a Danish study. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Teen Childbirth linked to increased risk for Heart Disease

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXWomen who became first-time mothers as teens were significantly more likely than older mothers to have greater risks for heart and blood vessel disease later in life, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers found that women reporting a first birth before the age of 20 scored significantly higher on Framingham Risk Score — a measure commonly used to estimate the 10-year cardiovascular risk.

Women who become teen-age mothers may be significantly more likely to have greater risks for cardiovascular disease later in life than older mothers. (American Heart Association)

Women who become teen-age mothers may be significantly more likely to have greater risks for cardiovascular disease later in life than older mothers. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Less than half of Patients prescribed new Cholesterol Drug receive Insurance Approval

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Less than half of patients received their insurer’s approval for prescriptions of PCSK9 inhibitors, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

PCSK9 inhibitors, like Repatha (evolocumab) and Praluent (alirocumab), work by increasing the removal of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or “bad” cholesterol from the blood. They have been shown to reduce LDL by 60 percent and decrease major cardiac events but cost much more than other cholesterol-lowering drugs with an average cost of $14,300 per year. Prescriptions require prior authorization by health insurance companies.

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

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