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Topic: Cardiovascular

American Heart Association says Quality of Stent Procedures consistently good across U.S. regardless of popular Hospital Ranking

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report Poster Presentation S2003

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Hospitals ranked among the best in cardiology and heart surgery by U.S. News and World Report appear no better at performing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a potentially life-saving heart procedure, than unranked hospitals, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), or angioplasty, for blocked or narrowed arteries appear to fare equally well at hospitals ranked among the best in heart care by U.S. News and World Report and at unranked hospitals. (American Heart Association)

Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), or angioplasty, for blocked or narrowed arteries appear to fare equally well at hospitals ranked among the best in heart care by U.S. News and World Report and at unranked hospitals. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Sexual Activity rarely a Heart-Stopping Activity

 

Sunday News Tip Poster Presentation S2086

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CASexual activity is rarely associated with sudden cardiac arrest, a life-threatening malfunction of the heart’s electrical system causing the heart to suddenly stop beating, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

To determine whether sexual activity might trigger sudden cardiac arrest, researchers examined records on 4,557 cases of cardiac arrest in adults between 2002 and 2015 in a community in the northwestern United States.

One in 100 cases of cardiac arrest in men was associated with sexual activity, compared with one in 1,000 cases in women. (American Heart Association)

One in 100 cases of cardiac arrest in men was associated with sexual activity, compared with one in 1,000 cases in women. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Men more likely to receive bystander CPR in public than Women

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Men are more likely to receive bystander CPR in public locations compared to women, and they are more likely to survive after the life-saving measure, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Using data from the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, a network of regional clinical centers in the United States and Canada studying out-of-hospital treatments of cardiac arrest and trauma, researchers analyzed 19,331 cardiac events in the home and in public.

Hands-Only CPR has just two easy steps: If you see a teen or adult suddenly collapse, (1) Call 9-1-1 and (2) Push hard and fast in the center of the chest to the beat of the disco song “Stayin’ Alive.” The American Heart Association’s Hands-OnlyTM CPR at this beat can more than double or triple a person’s chances of survival. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Teen Childbirth linked to increased risk for Heart Disease

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXWomen who became first-time mothers as teens were significantly more likely than older mothers to have greater risks for heart and blood vessel disease later in life, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers found that women reporting a first birth before the age of 20 scored significantly higher on Framingham Risk Score — a measure commonly used to estimate the 10-year cardiovascular risk.

Women who become teen-age mothers may be significantly more likely to have greater risks for cardiovascular disease later in life than older mothers. (American Heart Association)

Women who become teen-age mothers may be significantly more likely to have greater risks for cardiovascular disease later in life than older mothers. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Adverse Events spike after Blood Pressure Meds go Generic in Canada

 

Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – One month after generic versions of three widely-used blood pressure drugs became available in Canada, hospital visits for adverse events spiked in generic drug users, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

Researchers in Quebec compared hospital visits and emergency room consultations among 136,177 patients, aged 66 years and older, who took one of three hypertension medications before and after their generic versions became available. The drugs – losartan (Cozaar®), valsartan (Diovan®) and candesartan (Atacand®) – are also used in patients with heart failure.

One month after generic versions of three widely-used blood pressure drugs became available in Canada, hospital visits for adverse events spiked in generic drug users. (American Heart Association)

One month after generic versions of three widely-used blood pressure drugs became available in Canada, hospital visits for adverse events spiked in generic drug users. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Extreme Heat Exposure linked to Firefighter Heart Attacks

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Exposure to extreme heat and physical exertion during firefighting may trigger the formation of blood clots and impair blood vessel function, changes associated with increased risk of heart attack, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Cardiovascular events are the leading cause of death among firefighters and are responsible for roughly 45 percent of on-duty firefighter fatalities annually in the United States.

Exposure to extreme heat and physical exertion during firefighting may trigger the formation of blood clots and impair blood vessel function, changes associated with increased risk of heart attack. (American Heart Association)

Exposure to extreme heat and physical exertion during firefighting may trigger the formation of blood clots and impair blood vessel function, changes associated with increased risk of heart attack. (American Heart Association)

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Meal planning, timing, may impact heart health according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Planning when to eat meals and snacks and not skipping breakfast, are patterns associated with healthier diets, which could reduce cardiovascular disease risk, according to a new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

The statement provides a snapshot of the current scientific evidence suggesting when and how often people eat may impact risk factors for heart attack, stroke, or other cardiac or blood vessel diseases.

Planning and timing meals and snacks, such as not skipping breakfast and allocating more calories earlier in the day, might help reduce cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

Planning and timing meals and snacks, such as not skipping breakfast and allocating more calories earlier in the day, might help reduce cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says High Pain Tolerance may mask Heart Attack Symptoms

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Heart attacks may go unrecognized among individuals with high pain tolerance, putting them at an increased risk for poor recoveries, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

A heart attack does not always have obvious symptoms, such as pain in your chest, shortness of breath and cold sweats.

This is the cold pressor test that measured pain tolerance as participants placed their hand in ice-cold water at 3 degrees Celsius (about 37 degrees Fahrenheit) for as long as possible, up to two minutes. From Researcher Andrea Ohrn, M.D., study lead author and Ph.D. Fellow at University of Tromsø in Norway. (Stina Grønbech)

This is the cold pressor test that measured pain tolerance as participants placed their hand in ice-cold water at 3 degrees Celsius (about 37 degrees Fahrenheit) for as long as possible, up to two minutes. From Researcher Andrea Ohrn, M.D., study lead author and Ph.D. Fellow at University of Tromsø in Norway. (Stina Grønbech)

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American Heart Association reports Recreational, Commuter Biking linked to Lower Cardiovascular Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People who bike regularly, either for pleasure or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, according to two separate studies published simultaneously in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation and Journal of the American Heart Association, the AHA/ASA’s Open Access Journal.

While structured cycling as part of a formal workout routine is already known to guard against cardiovascular illness, little is known about the effects of habitual biking done for leisure or as a way to commute.

People who bike regularly, either recreationally or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular illness, according to studies conducted in Denmark and Sweden.

People who bike regularly, either recreationally or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular illness, according to studies conducted in Denmark and Sweden.

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American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology to Offer Hospital Cardiovascular Accreditation Services

 

Collaboration will support improvements in cardiovascular care and patient outcomes

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – U.S. hospitals and other institutions will have access to a single, comprehensive set of cardiovascular accreditation services through a new collaboration between the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA).

Starting in 2017, hospitals will be able to take advantage of a suite of co-branded accreditation services focused on all aspects of cardiac care, including chest pain, cardiac catheterization, atrial fibrillation, heart failure and other cardiovascular conditions.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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