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Topic: Cholesterol

American Heart Association says Eating Healthier Fats could reduce Heart Disease Deaths Worldwide

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Eating healthier fats could save more than a million people internationally from dying from heart disease, and the types of diet changes needed differ greatly between countries, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Worldwide, policymakers are focused on reducing saturated fats. Yet, we found there would be a much bigger impact on heart disease deaths if the priority was to increase the consumption of polyunsaturated fats as a replacement for saturated fats and refined carbohydrates, as well as to reduce trans fats,” said Dariush Mozaffarian, M.D., Dr.P.H., senior study author and dean of the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy in Boston.

Fats Infographic. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association Says New Dietary Guidelines Will Help Establish a Healthier Roadmap for Americans

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The American Heart Association (AHA) applauds the Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Agriculture (USDA) on the release of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

“The new federal dietary guidelines give Americans more flexibility in their diets without sacrificing their health. By providing a valuable source of nutrition information, the standards are part of a roadmap to help build a ‘culture of health’ in America. This healthier culture will help reduce our risk for heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world,” said Mark Creager, M.D., president of the American Heart Association.

Fats - The Good the Bad and the Ugly Infographic «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association announces 2015 Top Heart Disease, Stroke Research

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association is featuring the top advances in heart disease and stroke research in 2015 in a series of stories (listed below) on Heart.org.

Each story was selected by a panel of the association’s science staff and volunteers. The organization has compiled an annual list of the major advances in heart disease and stroke research each year since 1996.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association gives Seven Healthy Heart measures may reduce Heart Failure Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People scoring well on the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 checklist for a healthy heart are less likely to develop heart failure, a condition that reduces blood and oxygen flow to the body, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Heart Failure.

Life’s Simple 7 encompasses seven measures that people can use to rate their heart health and take steps to improve it. The measures are: manage blood pressure, control cholesterol, reduce blood sugar, get physically active, eat better, lose weight and stop smoking.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says new reversible drug shows early promise in preventing dangerous Clots

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new drug that protects against dangerous blood clots in patients undergoing procedures such as angioplasty to restore blood flow through the coronary arteries, appears safe, fast, and the effects are uniquely reversible, according to early testing described in the American Heart Association journal: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology.

Antiplatelet drugs currently available to patients carry an increased risk of bleeding.

A uniquely acting antiplatelet agent, PZ-128, appears to be safe and fast for preventing blood clots and its effects are reversible, reducing risk for excessive bleeding. (American Heart Association)

A uniquely acting antiplatelet agent, PZ-128, appears to be safe and fast for preventing blood clots and its effects are reversible, reducing risk for excessive bleeding. (American Heart Association)

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New statistics from American Heart Association shows one of every three U.S. Deaths caused by Cardiovascular Disease

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – One of every three deaths in the U.S. in 2013 were from heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases, while heart disease and stroke were the No. 1 and No. 2 killers worldwide, according to American Heart Association’s 2016 Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics Update. 

Produced since 1958, the update is created from the most-recent data available and compiled by the AHA, the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other government sources.

Brain Clot. (American Heart Association)

Brain Clot. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says short bursts of high-intensity exercise does more for Type 2 Diabetes

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – Short bursts of high-intensity exercise improved cholesterol, blood sugar and weight among Type 2 diabetes patients more than 30 minutes of sustained, lower-intensity exercise, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Researchers found that after three months of high-intensity exercise in 10-minute bursts done three times per day, five days a week, led to an average 0.82 percent decrease in three-month blood sugar patterns compared with just 0.25 percent among those who performed more sustained, lower-intensity exercise also five times per week.

Short bursts of high-intensity exercise improved cholesterol, blood sugar and weight among Type 2 diabetes patients more than 30 minutes of sustained, lower-intensity exercise. (American Heart Association)

Short bursts of high-intensity exercise improved cholesterol, blood sugar and weight among Type 2 diabetes patients more than 30 minutes of sustained, lower-intensity exercise.(American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Obese Kids young as age 8 show signs of Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – Imaging tests of obese children — some as young as 8 years old —  showed signs of significant heart disease and heart muscle abnormalities, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Comparing 20 obese kids with 20 normal-weight kids, researchers found that obesity was linked to 27 percent more muscle mass in the left ventricle of their hearts and 12 percent thicker heart muscles – both signs of heart disease.

Child weighing himself on a scale. (American Heart Association)

Child weighing himself on a scale. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says the No. 1 Killer is Invisible to most Women

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – Even though heart disease and stroke are the No. 1 killer of women in the U.S., most women say they don’t have a personal connection to cardiovascular disease, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

A 2014 nationally representative survey of 1,011 adult women found that those who know another woman with heart disease are 25 percent more likely to be concerned about it for themselves and 19 percent more likely to bring up heart health with their doctors. The survey was developed and conducted by the Women’s Heart Alliance.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Mobile Technology may help people improve Health Behaviors

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Smartphone applications and wearable sensors have the potential to help people make healthier lifestyle choices, but scientific evidence of mobile health technologies’ effectiveness for reducing risk factors for heart disease and stroke is limited, according to a scientific statement from the American Heart Association, published in the association’s journal Circulation.

The new statement reviewed the small body of published, peer-reviewed studies about the effectiveness of mobile health technologies (mHealth) for managing weight, increasing physical activity, quitting smoking and controlling high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

Vegetables at the market. (American Heart Association)

Vegetables at the market. (American Heart Association)

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