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Topic: Cholesterol

American Heart Association reports Children Score Low on Cardiovascular Health Measures

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Proactive strategies for promoting good heart health should begin at birth, yet most American children do not meet the American Heart Association’s definition of ideal childhood cardiovascular health, according to a new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

“Instead of taking a wait-and-see approach by treating disease later in adulthood, we should help children maintain the standards of ideal cardiovascular health that most children are born with,” said Julia Steinberger, M.D., M.S., lead author of the new statement, professor in pediatrics and director of pediatric cardiology at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

Most children are born with ideal cardiovascular health and promoting good heart health should begin at birth. (American Heart Association)

Most children are born with ideal cardiovascular health and promoting good heart health should begin at birth. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Heart Disease, Stroke Risk factors may increase in severity before Menopause

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The severity of key risk factors for heart disease, diabetes and stroke appears to increase more rapidly in the years leading up to menopause, rather than after, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The study also found that this pattern of rapidly increasing risk factors before menopause appears to be more pronounced among African-American women.

As women go through menopause, doctors and other care providers can use this “teachable moment” to emphasize the importance of diet and exercise in reducing cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

As women go through menopause, doctors and other care providers can use this “teachable moment” to emphasize the importance of diet and exercise in reducing cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association New Initiative aims to reduce repeat Heart Attacks

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Every 42 seconds someone in the U.S. has a heart attack. Just after noon on March 26th, 2016, Julie Kubala, become one of those statistics.

She’s working now to ensure she doesn’t become a different one – about 21 percent of women and 17 percent of men age 45 and older will have another heart attack within five years of their first one.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Fluctuations in “Bad” Cholesterol may be linked to worse Brain Health

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Greater fluctuations in “bad” cholesterol levels may be linked to worse cognitive function in elderly adults, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

In a study of European adults age 70 to 82 years old, researchers found that greater fluctuations in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), or “bad” cholesterol, are associated with lower cognitive performance.

The negative effect from fluctuations was found regardless of average bad cholesterol levels or use of cholesterol-lowering drugs. (American Heart Association)

The negative effect from fluctuations was found regardless of average bad cholesterol levels or use of cholesterol-lowering drugs. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Blood Glucose Health is decreasing in Obese Adults; increasing risks for Type 2 Diabetes, Cardio Complications

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXBlood glucose health is deteriorating in obese adults, despite overall progress in lowering blood pressure and cholesterol levels, which may raise the risk of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers said their findings suggest that controlling weight in obese adults to reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes should be a public health priority. (American Heart Association)

Researchers said their findings suggest that controlling weight in obese adults to reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes should be a public health priority. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Men may face high lifetime risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – About one in every nine men will experience sudden cardiac death, most before age 70, as well as about one in 30 women, according to research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Sudden cardiac death claims up to 450,000 American lives each year, according to the study and most commonly occurs in people with no prior symptoms of cardiovascular disease.

One in nine men may be at higher risk of premature death due to sudden cardiac death – usually with no warning. One in 30 women may face the same risk. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Genetically inherited High Cholesterol increases long-term risks of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Patients who experience high cholesterol due to an inherited genetic disorder from one of their parents—heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia— are much more likely than those with average cholesterol levels to have diseases caused by hardening of the arteries, including an accelerated onset of coronary heart disease by up to 30 years, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

The inherited form of high cholesterol—familial hypercholesterolemia—is a genetic disorder that is passed down through families.

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Prehypertension during Pregnancy could lead to Cardiovascular Risks

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Pregnant women who experience persistent blood pressure elevations in the upper ranges of normal may be at high risk of developing metabolic syndrome and increased cardiovascular risk after giving birth, according to research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Pregnant women who experience even subtle blood pressure elevations in the upper ranges of what is considered “normal” blood pressure appear more likely to develop metabolic syndrome after giving birth. (American Heart Association)

Pregnant women who experience even subtle blood pressure elevations in the upper ranges of what is considered “normal” blood pressure appear more likely to develop metabolic syndrome after giving birth. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Eating more Whole Grains linked with Lower Risk of Death

 

American Heart Association Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Eating at least three servings of whole grains every day could lower your risk of death, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Although dietary guidelines around the world have included whole grains as an essential component of healthy eating patterns, people aren’t eating enough, according to the analysis. In the United States average consumption remains below one serving a day, despite the long-time recommendation of three servings a day.

Eating at least three servings of whole grains a day was associated with lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer and all causes in an analysis of nutrition studies. (American Heart Association)

Eating at least three servings of whole grains a day was associated with lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer and all causes in an analysis of nutrition studies. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Weight loss surgery boosts good Cholesterol in obese Teen Boys

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – Weight loss surgery boosts the level of HDL “good” cholesterol and also improves its heart-protecting actions in severely obese teens, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology | Peripheral Vascular Disease 2016 Scientific Sessions.

“We already knew that weight loss surgery improves weight and cholesterol numbers. This new research shows that there are actually changes in the way HDL functions in adolescents, which may lead to a reduction in long-term cardiovascular risk,” said pediatric endocrinologist Amy S. Shah, M.D., lead author of the study and assistant professor of pediatrics at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital in Ohio.

Amy S. Shah, M.D., professor of pediatrics at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital in Ohio. (Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center)

Amy S. Shah, M.D., professor of pediatrics at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital in Ohio. (Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center)

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