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Topic: Cholesterol

American Heart Association reports African Americans with Healthier Lifestyles had lower risk of High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Among African Americans, small health improvements were associated with lower risk of developing high blood pressure, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

African Americans who had at least two modifiable healthy behaviors at the beginning of the study, compared to those with one or none, researchers found the risk of high blood pressure at follow-up was reduced by 20 percent.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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In spite of extraordinary progress, more needs to be done to save Women from Heart Disease, says American Heart Association CEO

 

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C.American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown and co-author of the study “Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs Regarding Cardiovascular Disease in Women” published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, issued the following comments:

“Cardiovascular diseases cause 1 in 3 deaths among women each year – more than all cancers combined. That’s why the American Heart Association first brought this critical issue to light through the creation of the Go Red For Women™ movement in 2004.”

Nancy Brown; Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association

Nancy Brown; Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association

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American Heart Association says Breastfeeding may reduce a Mother’s Heart Attack and Stroke Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Breastfeeding is not only healthy for babies, it may also reduce a mother’s risk of having a heart attack or stroke later in life, according to new research published in of the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Previous studies have suggested that mothers get short-term health benefits from breastfeeding, such as weight loss and lower cholesterol, blood pressure and glucose levels after pregnancy.

A study of Chinese women found that the longer a mother breastfeeds, the greater the cardiovascular health benefit appears to be. (American Heart Association)

A study of Chinese women found that the longer a mother breastfeeds, the greater the cardiovascular health benefit appears to be. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Chronic Anabolic Steroid use may damage Heart, Arteries

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Long-term anabolic-androgenic steroid use may reduce the heart’s ability to pump blood throughout the body, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

In addition, long-term anabolic-androgenic steroid use damages the heart muscle’s ability to relax and may cause atherosclerotic coronary artery disease.

Anabolic-androgenic steroids mimic naturally occurring testosterone, a muscle-building hormone that promotes male sexual characteristics.

Hardening of the arteries is associated with long-term anabolic steroid use. (American Heart Association)

Hardening of the arteries is associated with long-term anabolic steroid use. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Golden Years are longer and healthier for those with Good Heart Health in Middle Age

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People with no major heart disease risk factors in middle age live longer and stay healthy far longer than others, according to a 40-year study reported in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Good cardiovascular health in middle age delays the onset of many types of disease so that people live longer and spend a much smaller proportion of their lives with chronic illness,” said Norrina Allen, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

A Healthy Heart in Middle Age Could Add Almost Four Years to Your Life After Age 65 and Save You $18,000 in Medicare Care Costs. Graphic shows these benefits for middle aged adults who don't smoke or have diabetes, maintain a normal weight, have good blood pressure and good cholesterol. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says “Bad” air may impact “Good” Cholesterol increasing Heart Disease Risk

 

Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Traffic-related air pollution may increase cardiovascular disease risk by lowering levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), commonly known as “good” cholesterol, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

Scientists have long known that air pollution increases the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis and heart failure, but are uncertain how the two are connected.

(At left), Air quality equipment monitors traffic-related air pollution on a New York City highway. (The MESA Air Study)

(At left), Air quality equipment monitors traffic-related air pollution on a New York City highway. (The MESA Air Study)

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American Heart Association says Depressed Veterans with Heart Disease face financial barriers to care

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationArlington, VA – Veterans with heart disease who are also depressed are more likely than those without depression to have trouble paying for medications and medical visits and often report delays in seeking medical care, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research 2017 Scientific Sessions.

More than 20 percent of veterans with cardiovascular disease also suffered from depression in 2013. (American Heart Association)

More than 20 percent of veterans with cardiovascular disease also suffered from depression in 2013. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Good Communication helps improve outcomes for Heart Patients

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationArlington, VA – Patients with hardened arteries who reported good communication with their healthcare providers were less likely to use the emergency room and more likely to comply with their treatment plans, according to a new study presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2017. 

Patients who said they communicated effectively with their healthcare providers were more likely to report the use of prescribed statin drugs and aspirin. (American Heart Association)

Patients who said they communicated effectively with their healthcare providers were more likely to report the use of prescribed statin drugs and aspirin. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association warns Cardiovascular Disease Costs Will Exceed $1 Trillion by 2035

 

Nearly Half of Americans Will Develop Pre-existing CVD Conditions

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – A new study, released today by the American Heart Association, projects that by 2035, cardiovascular disease (CVD), the most costly and prevalent killer, if left unchecked, will place a crushing economic and health burden on the nation’s financial and health care systems.

According to the study, in the next two decades, the number of Americans with CVD will rise to 131.2 million – 45 percent of the total U.S. population – with costs expected to reach $1.1 trillion.

This is the American Heart Association's Salty Six Infographic highlighting six popular foods that can add high levels of sodium to your diet. They are bread and rolls, cold cuts, cured meat, pizza, poultry, soup, and sandwiches. (American Heart Association)

This is the American Heart Association’s Salty Six Infographic highlighting six popular foods that can add high levels of sodium to your diet. They are bread and rolls, cold cuts, cured meat, pizza, poultry, soup, and sandwiches. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health says Heart Disease Still Tennessee’s Top Cause of Death

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – While matters of the heart are top of mind near Valentine’s Day, more Tennesseans should think about them all year long to ensure healthier, longer lives.

Tennessee Department of Health data show heart disease is still the leading cause of death in the state, while stroke rated fifth in claiming lives.

Lifestyle Changes Can Save Lives

Lifestyle Changes Can Save Lives

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