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Topic: Comet

NASA releases 3D image from Rosetta spacecraft of Philae’s landing on Comet

 

Written by DC Agle
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – A 3D image shows what it would look like to fly over the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

The image was generated from data collected by the Rosetta Lander Imaging System (ROLIS) aboard the European Space Agency’s Philae spacecraft during the descent to the spacecraft’s initial touchdown on the comet November 12th.

The stereographic image was generated using two images acquired by ROLIS when Philae was a little less than 2 miles (3 kilometers) from the surface.

 

This 3D image shows what it would look like to fly over the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The image was generated by data collected by the ROLIS instrument aboard the European Space Agency's Philae spacecraft during the decent to the spacecraft's initial touchdown on the comet Nov. 12. (ESA/Rosetta/Philae/ROLIS/DLR)

This 3D image shows what it would look like to fly over the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The image was generated by data collected by the ROLIS instrument aboard the European Space Agency’s Philae spacecraft during the decent to the spacecraft’s initial touchdown on the comet Nov. 12. (ESA/Rosetta/Philae/ROLIS/DLR)

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NASA releases images of Rosetta Spacecraft’s Philae Lander as it bounced/landed on Comet

 

Written by DC Agle
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Images taken by the Rosetta spacecraft’s OSIRIS imaging system show the portions of the journey its Philae comet lander undertook on November 12th, as it approached and then rebounded off the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

The mosaic comprises a series of images captured by OSIRIS’s narrow-angle camera over a 30-minute period spanning the first touchdown. The images were taken with Rosetta’s OSIRIS narrow-angle camera when the Rosetta spacecraft was orbiting the comet at about 9.6 miles (15.5 kilometers) from the surface.

The descent of its comet lander Philae was captured by the Rosetta spacecraft's main camera as the lander approached - and then rebounded off - the comet's surface. (ESA/Rosetta/MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA)

The descent of its comet lander Philae was captured by the Rosetta spacecraft’s main camera as the lander approached – and then rebounded off – the comet’s surface. (ESA/Rosetta/MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA)

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NASA reports Rosetta’s Philae Lander touches down on Comet

 

Written by DC Agle
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – On Wednesday, November 12th, the European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission successfully landed on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Descending at a speed of about 2 mph (3.2 kilometers per hour) the lander, called “Philae,” first touched down and its signal was received at 8:03am PST (11:03am EST).

Partially due to anchoring harpoons not firing, and the comet’s low gravity (a hundred-thousand times less than that of Earth), Philae bounced off the surface and flew up to about six-tenths of a mile (1 kilometer) both above the comet’s surface as well as downrange.

This image of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko marks the first touchdown point of the Philae lander of the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission. The image was taken by the Onboard Scientific Imaging System (OSIRIS) on the Rosetta orbiter from a distance of about 19 miles (30 kilometers) on Sept. 14, 2104, nearly two months before Philae's Nov. 12 landing.

This image of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko marks the first touchdown point of the Philae lander of the European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission. The image was taken by the Onboard Scientific Imaging System (OSIRIS) on the Rosetta orbiter from a distance of about 19 miles (30 kilometers) on Sept. 14, 2104, nearly two months before Philae’s Nov. 12 landing.

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NASA announces Rosetta Spacecraft’s Philae Lander has made historic touch down on a Comet

 

Written by DC Agle/Guy Webster
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – After more than a decade traveling through space, a robotic lander built by the European Space Agency has made the first-ever soft landing of a spacecraft on a comet.

Mission controllers at ESA’s mission operations center in Darmstadt, Germany, received a signal confirming that the Philae lander had touched down on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on Wednesday, November 12th, just after 8:00am PST/11:00am EST.

This image of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko was taken by the Philae lander of the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission during Philae's descent toward the comet on Nov. 12, 2014. Philae's ROLIS camera took the image from a distance of approximately two miles (three kilometers) from the surface. (ESA/Rosetta/Philae/DLR)

This image of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko was taken by the Philae lander of the European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission during Philae’s descent toward the comet on Nov. 12, 2014. Philae’s ROLIS camera took the image from a distance of approximately two miles (three kilometers) from the surface. (ESA/Rosetta/Philae/DLR)

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NASA announces Rosetta spacecraft’s lander “Philae” to make historic rendezvous with Comet today

 

Written by DC Agle
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Early Tuesday morning, the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft will deploy its comet lander, “Philae.” A little over seven hours later (8:00am PST/11:00am EST), the experiment-laden, harpoon-firing Philae is scheduled to touch down on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

It will be the first time in history that a spacecraft has attempted a soft landing on a comet. Rosetta is an international mission led by the European Space Agency (ESA), with instruments provided by its member states, and additional support and instruments provided by NASA.

Some relatively rough terrain on the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko appears in this image taken by the navigation camera on the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft during the second half of October 2014. (ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM)

Some relatively rough terrain on the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko appears in this image taken by the navigation camera on the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft during the second half of October 2014. (ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM)

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NASA Spacecraft analyzes effects of Comet Flyby on Mar’s Atmosphere

 

Written by Guy Webster
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Two NASA and one European spacecraft that obtained the first up-close observations of a comet flyby of Mars on October 19th, have gathered new information about the basic properties of the comet’s nucleus and directly detected the effects on the Martian atmosphere.

Data from observations carried out by NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), and a radar instrument on the European Space Agency’s (ESA’s) Mars Express spacecraft have revealed that debris from the comet added a temporary and very strong layer of ions to the ionosphere, the electrically charged layer high above Mars.

This artist's concept depicts the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) on NASA's MAVEN spacecraft scanning the upper atmosphere of Mars. IUVS uses limb scans to map the chemical makeup and vertical structure across Mars' upper atmosphere. (NASA/Univ. of Colorado)

This artist’s concept depicts the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) on NASA’s MAVEN spacecraft scanning the upper atmosphere of Mars. IUVS uses limb scans to map the chemical makeup and vertical structure across Mars’ upper atmosphere. (NASA/Univ. of Colorado)

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NASA reports Rosetta spacecraft speeding to Comet

 

Written by DC Agle and Guy Webster
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – After sailing through space for more than 10 years, the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft is now less than a week shy of landing a robotic probe on a comet.

The mission’s Philae (fee-LAY) lander is scheduled to touch down on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on Wednesday, November 12th at 7:35amPST/10:35am EST. A signal confirming the landing is expected about 8:02am PST/11:02am EST.

If all goes as planned with this complex engineering feat, it will be the first-ever soft landing of a spacecraft on a comet.

This is a rare glance at the dark side of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Light backscattered from dust particles in the comet's coma reveals a hint of surface structures. (ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA)

This is a rare glance at the dark side of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Light backscattered from dust particles in the comet’s coma reveals a hint of surface structures. (ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA)

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NASA looks at what it will take to land Philae on a Comet

 

Written by Tony Phillips
Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Generally speaking, space missions fall into one of three categories:  difficult, more difficult, and ridiculously difficult.

Flybys are difficult.  A spaceship travels hundreds of millions of miles through the dark void of space, pinpoints a distant planet or moon, and flies past it at 20 to 30 thousand mph, snapping pictures furiously during an achingly brief encounter.

Going into orbit is more difficult. Instead of flying past its target, the approaching spaceship brakes, changing its velocity by just the right amount to circle the planet.  One wrong move and the spacecraft bounces off the atmosphere, becoming an unintended meteor.

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NASA reports Rosetta Spacecraft’s target Comet has begun streaming Gas and Dust

 

Written by DC Agle
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – This image of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, taken by Rosetta’s Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System (OSIRIS) on September 20th, from a distance of 4.5 miles (7.2 kilometers), shows jets of dust and gas streaming into space from the neck of the comet’s nucleus.

Images of the comet nucleus, taken by Rosetta earlier in the summer, showed that the distinct jets of dust and gas emanating from the comet were originated from the neck region, which connects the comet’s two lobes. Images obtained by OSIRIS now show jets of dust along almost the entire length of the comet.

This image was taken by the Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System, Rosetta's main onboard scientific imaging system, on Sept. 10, 2014. (ESA/Rosetta/MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/ INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA)

This image was taken by the Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System, Rosetta’s main onboard scientific imaging system, on Sept. 10, 2014. (ESA/Rosetta/MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/ INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA)

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NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter takes image revealing that the Nucleus of Comet Siding Spring is Small

 

Written by Guy Webster
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter captured views of comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring while that visitor sped past Mars on Sunday (October 19th), yielding information about its nucleus.

The images are the highest-resolution views ever acquired of a comet coming from the Oort Cloud at the fringes of the solar system.

These images were taken of comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on Oct. 19, 2014, during the comet's close flyby of Mars and the spacecraft. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona)

These images were taken of comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on Oct. 19, 2014, during the comet’s close flyby of Mars and the spacecraft. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona)

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