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American Heart Association says Midlife Fitness is linked to lower Stroke Risks later in Life

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The more fit you are in your midlife, the less likely you are to have a stroke after age 65, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

“We all hear that exercise is good for you, but many people still don’t do it. Our hope is that this objective data on preventing a fatal disease such as stroke, will help motivate people to get moving and get fit,” said Ambarish Pandey, M.D., the first author of the study and a cardiology fellow at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas.

Being more physically fit in your mid- to late-40s was associated with lower stroke risks after age 65, independent of traditional stroke risk factors such as high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes and atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

Being more physically fit in your mid- to late-40s was associated with lower stroke risks after age 65, independent of traditional stroke risk factors such as high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes and atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

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TRICARE Retiree Dental Program

 

Good dental health and good overall health go hand in hand

US TRICAREFalls Church, VA – With its emphasis on diagnostic and preventive care, the TRICARE Retiree Dental Program can help you avoid bigger problems down the road.

Did you know that more than 120 different diseases are first detected in the mouth? And that going for your annual dental exams can actually help in detecting heart disease, diabetes, pancreatic cancer and more?

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American Heart Association says Post Coronary Artery Bypass Infections may be linked to severe Obesity

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXCoronary artery bypass patients who have severe obesity are more likely to experience infection shortly after surgery and stay in the hospital longer, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Compared to coronary artery bypass patients with normal weight, patients with severe obesity were three times more likely to develop an infection after bypass surgery, researchers said.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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Smoking may increase kidney disease risk in African-Americans according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXCigarette smoking is considered a universal health hazard, but it may be particularly damaging to kidney function among African-Americans smokers, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Cardiovascular and kidney diseases are closely linked, but few people are aware of the impact of smoking on kidney function,” said Michael Hall, M.D., study lead author and an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Mississippi Medical Center.

Cigarette smoking may be damaging to kidney function in African-Americans.

Cigarette smoking may be damaging to kidney function in African-Americans.

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American Heart Association reports Healthy Diet may reduce High Blood Pressure risk in Pregnancy-Related Diabetes

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women with pregnancy-related diabetes  (gestational diabetes) are at greater risk of developing high blood pressure later in life; however, a healthy diet may significantly reduce that risk, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Researchers studied 3,818 women with a history of pregnancy-related diabetes enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study II as a part of the ongoing Diabetes & Women’s Health Study. Over 22 years of follow-up, 1,069 women developed high blood pressure, which in turn increased their risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

A healthy diet may reduce the risk that women with pregnancy-related diabetes will develop high blood pressure later in life. (American Heart Association)

A healthy diet may reduce the risk that women with pregnancy-related diabetes will develop high blood pressure later in life. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Hispanics/Latinos at higher risk for Cardiac Dysfunction, Heart Failure

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Hispanics/Latinos have higher rates of cardiac dysfunction but are rarely aware they have the heart-pumping problem that can lead to heart failure, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Heart Failure.

Researchers found that about half of the 1,818 adults in their study of middle-aged and older Hispanics/Latinos had cardiac dysfunction, yet fewer than 1 in 20 participants knew they had a problem.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Statin use differs among Hispanic Adults at risk for Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In the United States, adults of different Hispanic/Latino backgrounds, at high risk for heart disease, varied significantly in their use of widely-prescribed cholesterol-lowering medications known as statins, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association. The difference was based on whether or not they had health insurance.

“These findings have important implications for preventing disparities in cardiovascular outcomes within the growing U.S. Hispanic/Latino population,” said study lead author Dima M. Qato, Pharm.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmacy systems, outcomes and policy at the University of Illinois in Chicago.

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health says Zika Virus Disease raises awareness about Preventing Birth Defects

 

Microcephaly One of Many Defects that Deserve Attention

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – Until a recent outbreak of Zika virus disease was associated with babies born with microcephaly, many had not heard of the birth defect. Tennessee Department of Health data show approximately 45 to 50 cases occur in Tennessee each year.

Babies with microcephaly are born with heads that are smaller than expected. This can be associated with developmental delays, intellectual disabilities, problems with hearing or vision and seizures.

A newborn baby gets caressed by its new mother

A newborn baby gets caressed by its new mother

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American Heart Association says a ten percent price change could prevent Heart Disease and Death

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPhoenix, AZ – A ten percent drop in price for healthy foods and a ten percent increase in the price of unhealthy foods could potentially prevent a significant number of people from dying from heart disease and stroke, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific 2016 meeting.

Decreasing the price of fruits, vegetables and grains by ten percent, while increasing the price of sugary drinks by ten percent, could prevent 515,000 deaths from cardiovascular disease over 20 years. (American Heart Association)

Decreasing the price of fruits, vegetables and grains by ten percent, while increasing the price of sugary drinks by ten percent, could prevent 515,000 deaths from cardiovascular disease over 20 years. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health says Healthy Hearts Need Activity in Winter Months

 

TDH Offers Suggestions to Improve Heart Health

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Heart disease is the number one killer of adults in Tennessee and among its primary causes are poor diets and a lack of adequate physical activity.

The Tennessee Department of Health reminds individuals the winter months demand increased attention for heart health because short days and cold weather prompt many of us to crave comfy couches and calorie-rich, feel-good foods.

Walking outdoors.

Walking outdoors.

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