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American Heart Association says Yo-Yo Dieting Dangerous even if you’re not Overweight

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Repeatedly losing and regaining weight, known as weight cycling or yo-yo dieting, may increase the risk of death from heart disease among postmenopausal women who were of normal weight at the start of the study, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Normal weight postmenopausal women at the start of the study who lost and regained weight had: 3 and ½ times higher risk for sudden cardiac death and nearly 66% increased risk for coronary heart disease death. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reports Poor Sleep may increase risk for Irregular Heart Rhythms

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Disruptions in sleep may be raising your risks of an irregular heartbeat, known as atrial fibrillation (AF), according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Obstructive sleep apnea, sleep interrupted by pauses in breathing, is a known risk for atrial fibrillation – an irregular heartbeat that can lead to strokes, heart failure and other heart-related complications. But whether there’s a relationship between disrupted sleep and atrial fibrillation even when there’s no sleep apnea is unclear.

Poor sleep – even if you don’t have sleep apnea – may be linked to higher risks of developing an irregular heartbeat. (American Heart Association)

Poor sleep – even if you don’t have sleep apnea – may be linked to higher risks of developing an irregular heartbeat. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Bariatric Surgery may reduce Heart Failure Risk

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Bariatric surgery and other treatments that cause substantial weight loss can significantly reduce the risk of heart failure in obese patients, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Researchers compared 25,804 bariatric surgery patients in a Scandinavian obesity surgery registry to 13,701 Swedish nationwide registry patients who used an intensive structured lifestyle-modification program. Both groups had no history of heart failure before starting treatment and body mass indices greater than 30 and weighed on average 119 kilograms/262.35 pounds before treatment.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Recreational, Commuter Biking linked to Lower Cardiovascular Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People who bike regularly, either for pleasure or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, according to two separate studies published simultaneously in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation and Journal of the American Heart Association, the AHA/ASA’s Open Access Journal.

While structured cycling as part of a formal workout routine is already known to guard against cardiovascular illness, little is known about the effects of habitual biking done for leisure or as a way to commute.

People who bike regularly, either recreationally or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular illness, according to studies conducted in Denmark and Sweden.

People who bike regularly, either recreationally or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular illness, according to studies conducted in Denmark and Sweden.

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American Heart Association Launches +color to Help Transform the American Diet

 

SUBWAY® Restaurants Joins the American Heart Association to Encourage All Americans To Add One More Cup of Color

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In a landmark nationwide effort, the American Heart Association (AHA) is announcing a new initiative called +color, focusing on the positive health impact of fruits and vegetables.

The health impact of +color may be simple yet significant: It is estimated that if Americans ate the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables every day, approximately 39,900 deaths would be prevented from cardiovascular diseases, stroke and diabetes and $7.6 billion in medical costs could be saved annually.[1],[2]

The American Heart Association (AHA) is announcing a new initiative called +color, focusing on the positive health impact of fruits and vegetables. (American Heart Association)

The American Heart Association (AHA) is announcing a new initiative called +color, focusing on the positive health impact of fruits and vegetables. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health says Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease a Silent, Slow-Acting Killer

 

Lifestyle Changes Could Prevent Disease from Occurring, Save Lives

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Healthcare professionals are seeing evidence of a troubling new epidemic: nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a potentially fatal condition that can follow a lifestyle of too little physical activity and a high-calorie diet with too much sugar.

The disease develops gradually as extra fat accumulates in the liver, usually has no early warning signs and causes irreversible harm to one of the body’s most important organs.

Health Alert «Read the rest of this article»

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Sleep disorders may influence heart disease risk factors says American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Sleep problems including sleeping too little or too long, may be linked to a variety of factors that may raise the risk for cardiovascular diseases, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

The first statement by the American Heart Association on sleep and heart health outlines what we currently know about sleep irregularities and cardiovascular-related risk factors, including obesity, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and atherosclerosis, arrhythmias, high blood pressure, stroke, unhealthy levels of triglycerides and cholesterol.

Research linking sleep problems to obesity and diabetes is robust, but longer studies measuring impact on actual weight are needed. (American Heart Association)

Research linking sleep problems to obesity and diabetes is robust, but longer studies measuring impact on actual weight are needed. (American Heart Association)

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Drinking alcohol daily may enlarge heart chamber; lead to atrial fibrillation according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Despite the common perception that moderate alcohol intake is good for the heart, new research suggests long-term alcohol consumption, even as little as one drink a day may enlarge the heart’s left upper chamber (atrium) and increase the risk of developing atrial fibrillation, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Daily, long-term alcohol consumption was associated with a five percent higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

Daily, long-term alcohol consumption was associated with a five percent higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Exercise can help keep Medical Costs Down

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Getting recommended levels of exercise weekly may help keep down annual medical costs both for people with and without cardiovascular disease, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Although it’s well known that regular moderate exercise reduces risk of heart disease, stroke, and chronic conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure, “our findings also emphasize the favorable impact on how much you pay for healthcare,” said Khurram Nasir, M.D., M.P.H., senior author of the study and director of the Center for Healthcare Advancement & Outcomes and the High Risk Cardiovascular Disease Clinic at Baptist Health South Florida in Coral Gables.

Patients with heart disease who met weekly guidelines for moderate to vigorous exercise saved on average more than $2,500 in annual healthcare costs. (American Heart Association)

Patients with heart disease who met weekly guidelines for moderate to vigorous exercise saved on average more than $2,500 in annual healthcare costs. (American Heart Association)

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Frazier Allen: The New Disruptors of Old Age

 

F&M Investment Services - Raymond JamesNashville, TN – The traditional wisdom among Silicon Valley’s youthful technorati is to design for what you know—texting your friends in Europe for free (WhatsApp), renting out your bedroom to make extra cash (Airbnb), finding a romantic partner without leaving your house (Tinder). But a handful of entrepreneurs are now looking beyond the millennial market to reach a new demographic with their own needs — baby boomers.

“You’ve got all these 20-something engineering types who are beginning to realize there are older adults who can make use of these products to promote health and well-being,” said Andrew Scharlach, Professor of Aging at the University of California, Berkeley. “What we are beginning to see is the marriage of product developers with the end users that they previously had not been aware of.”

From smart phones to smart homes, emerging technology is changing the way Americans approach aging — and Baby Boomers welcome the advances.

From smart phones to smart homes, emerging technology is changing the way Americans approach aging — and Baby Boomers welcome the advances.

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