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American Heart Association reports Excessive daily TV watching may increase risk of Death

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Watching a lot of television every day may increase your risk of dying from a blood clot in the lung, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

A lung blood clot, known medically as a pulmonary embolism, usually begins as a clot in the leg or pelvis as a result of inactivity and slowed blood flow.

Watching more than 5 hours of TV daily was linked to more than double the risk of death from a blood clot in the lung. (American Heart Association)

Watching more than 5 hours of TV daily was linked to more than double the risk of death from a blood clot in the lung. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Pre-Stroke risk factors influence long-term future Stroke, Dementia Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – If you had heart disease risk factors, such as high blood pressure, before your first stroke, your risk of suffering subsequent strokes and dementia up to five years later may be higher, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

“We already know that stroke patients have an increased risk of recurrent stroke and dementia,” said M. Arfan Ikram, M.D., Ph.D., senior study author and associate professor, department of epidemiology, neurology and radiology, Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Everyone has regrets. Don’t let your Brain Health be one. Choices you make today can help prevent stroke and heart disease and keep you mentally sharp as you age. Avoid brain problems like stroke, memory loss and dementia by controlling your risk factors. (American Heart Association)

Everyone has regrets. Don’t let your Brain Health be one. Choices you make today can help prevent stroke and heart disease and keep you mentally sharp as you age. Avoid brain problems like stroke, memory loss and dementia by controlling your risk factors. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Blood Glucose Health is decreasing in Obese Adults; increasing risks for Type 2 Diabetes, Cardio Complications

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXBlood glucose health is deteriorating in obese adults, despite overall progress in lowering blood pressure and cholesterol levels, which may raise the risk of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers said their findings suggest that controlling weight in obese adults to reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes should be a public health priority. (American Heart Association)

Researchers said their findings suggest that controlling weight in obese adults to reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes should be a public health priority. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Men may face high lifetime risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – About one in every nine men will experience sudden cardiac death, most before age 70, as well as about one in 30 women, according to research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Sudden cardiac death claims up to 450,000 American lives each year, according to the study and most commonly occurs in people with no prior symptoms of cardiovascular disease.

One in nine men may be at higher risk of premature death due to sudden cardiac death – usually with no warning. One in 30 women may face the same risk. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Midlife Fitness is linked to lower Stroke Risks later in Life

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The more fit you are in your midlife, the less likely you are to have a stroke after age 65, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

“We all hear that exercise is good for you, but many people still don’t do it. Our hope is that this objective data on preventing a fatal disease such as stroke, will help motivate people to get moving and get fit,” said Ambarish Pandey, M.D., the first author of the study and a cardiology fellow at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas.

Being more physically fit in your mid- to late-40s was associated with lower stroke risks after age 65, independent of traditional stroke risk factors such as high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes and atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

Being more physically fit in your mid- to late-40s was associated with lower stroke risks after age 65, independent of traditional stroke risk factors such as high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes and atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

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TRICARE Retiree Dental Program

 

Good dental health and good overall health go hand in hand

US TRICAREFalls Church, VA – With its emphasis on diagnostic and preventive care, the TRICARE Retiree Dental Program can help you avoid bigger problems down the road.

Did you know that more than 120 different diseases are first detected in the mouth? And that going for your annual dental exams can actually help in detecting heart disease, diabetes, pancreatic cancer and more?

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American Heart Association says Post Coronary Artery Bypass Infections may be linked to severe Obesity

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXCoronary artery bypass patients who have severe obesity are more likely to experience infection shortly after surgery and stay in the hospital longer, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Compared to coronary artery bypass patients with normal weight, patients with severe obesity were three times more likely to develop an infection after bypass surgery, researchers said.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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Smoking may increase kidney disease risk in African-Americans according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXCigarette smoking is considered a universal health hazard, but it may be particularly damaging to kidney function among African-Americans smokers, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Cardiovascular and kidney diseases are closely linked, but few people are aware of the impact of smoking on kidney function,” said Michael Hall, M.D., study lead author and an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Mississippi Medical Center.

Cigarette smoking may be damaging to kidney function in African-Americans.

Cigarette smoking may be damaging to kidney function in African-Americans.

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American Heart Association reports Healthy Diet may reduce High Blood Pressure risk in Pregnancy-Related Diabetes

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women with pregnancy-related diabetes  (gestational diabetes) are at greater risk of developing high blood pressure later in life; however, a healthy diet may significantly reduce that risk, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Researchers studied 3,818 women with a history of pregnancy-related diabetes enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study II as a part of the ongoing Diabetes & Women’s Health Study. Over 22 years of follow-up, 1,069 women developed high blood pressure, which in turn increased their risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

A healthy diet may reduce the risk that women with pregnancy-related diabetes will develop high blood pressure later in life. (American Heart Association)

A healthy diet may reduce the risk that women with pregnancy-related diabetes will develop high blood pressure later in life. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Hispanics/Latinos at higher risk for Cardiac Dysfunction, Heart Failure

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Hispanics/Latinos have higher rates of cardiac dysfunction but are rarely aware they have the heart-pumping problem that can lead to heart failure, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Heart Failure.

Researchers found that about half of the 1,818 adults in their study of middle-aged and older Hispanics/Latinos had cardiac dysfunction, yet fewer than 1 in 20 participants knew they had a problem.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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