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Topic: diabetes

American Heart Association Says Heart Structure may change with Arsenic in Drinking Water

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, an American Heart Association journal drinking water that is contaminated with arsenic may lead to thickening of the heart’s main pumping chamber in young adults, a structural change that increases the risk for future heart problems.

Among young adults, drinking water contaminated with arsenic may lead to structural changes in the heart that raise their risk of heart disease. (American Heart Association)

Among young adults, drinking water contaminated with arsenic may lead to structural changes in the heart that raise their risk of heart disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Sugar Added Labels on packaged foods, beverages could lower Heart Disease/Diabetes risk, Cut Healthcare Costs

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new study published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation shows a label showing added sugars content on all packaged foods and sugary drinks could have substantial health and cost-saving benefits in the United States over the next 20 years .

Using a validated model, researchers were able to estimate a significant reduction in cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes cases from 2018 to 2037, if such a mandated addition to the Nutrition Label was implemented.

Labeling food products and beverages for added sugars could generate substantial health benefits over the next 20 years, potentially preventing nearly 1 million cases of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and lowering healthcare costs. (American Heart Association)

Labeling food products and beverages for added sugars could generate substantial health benefits over the next 20 years, potentially preventing nearly 1 million cases of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and lowering healthcare costs. (American Heart Association)

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American College of Cardiology / American Heart Association Guidance for Preventing Heart Disease, Stroke

 

American Heart Association 

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – The choices we make every day can have a lasting effect on our heart and vascular health. Adopting a heart healthy eating plan, getting more exercise, avoiding tobacco and managing known risk factors are among the key recommendations in the 2019 Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease guideline from the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA).

Also, it is recommended that aspirin should only rarely be used to help prevent heart attacks and stroke in people without known cardiovascular disease.

4 chambers of the heart: right atrium, right ventricle, left atrium, left ventricle. (American Heart Association)

4 chambers of the heart: right atrium, right ventricle, left atrium, left ventricle. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Adding High-Quality Plant-Based Foods to Diet decreases risk of Deaths from Heart Disease and other causes

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationHouston, TX – As long as you don’t count French fries and soda as healthy choices, it’s never too late to increase your longevity and cut your risk of heart disease death by adding fruits and vegetables to your diet, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2019, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Even in middle age, adding healthy plant foods such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables to your diet may reduce the risk of death from heart disease and other causes. (American Heart Association)

Even in middle age, adding healthy plant foods such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables to your diet may reduce the risk of death from heart disease and other causes. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says better options needed for Children at higher risk of Premature Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXObesity and severe obesity in childhood and adolescence have been added to the list of conditions that put children and teens at increased risk for premature heart disease, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association published in the Association’s journal Circulation.

New developments in identifying and treating the increased risk of premature heart disease in children and teens with certain medical conditions associated with increased cardiovascular risk are discussed in a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. (American Heart Association)

New developments in identifying and treating the increased risk of premature heart disease in children and teens with certain medical conditions associated with increased cardiovascular risk are discussed in a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. (American Heart Association)

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Clarksville-Montgomery County Community Health Foundation awards Matthew Walker Grant to APSU for 10th year

 

Austin Peay State University (APSU) 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – The Clarksville-Montgomery County Community Health Foundation has awarded nearly $15,000 to the Austin Peay State University Foundation through the Matthew Walker Grant for the 10th consecutive year. The funding will benefit the APSU School of Nursing.

Austin Peay State University Nursing Faculty members Dr. Doris Davenport, Dr. Patty Orr and Dr. Shondell Hickson. (APSU)

Austin Peay State University Nursing Faculty members Dr. Doris Davenport, Dr. Patty Orr and Dr. Shondell Hickson. (APSU)

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American Heart Association reports Diet Drinks may be associated with Strokes among Post-Menopausal Women

 

American Heart Association Stroke Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Among post-menopausal women, drinking multiple diet drinks daily was associated with an increase in the risk of having a stroke caused by a blocked artery, especially small arteries, according to research published in Stroke, a journal of the American Heart Association.

In a large observational study, women who reported drinking more than one diet soda or other artificially sweetened drink a day had a higher risk of strokes caused by a blood clot. (American Heart Association)

In a large observational study, women who reported drinking more than one diet soda or other artificially sweetened drink a day had a higher risk of strokes caused by a blood clot. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Governor Bill Lee to Repeal the Gym Tax in the Upcoming Budget

 

Tennessee Governor Bill Lee’s first budget to include Tax Cuts

Tennessee State GovernmentNashville, TN – Today, Tuesday, February 19th, 2019, Tennessee Governor Bill Lee announced his plans to repeal the amusement tax on gym memberships in his upcoming budget.

“I’m pleased to be able to include a tax cut in my first budget,” said Lee. “Repealing the gym tax is an important step in reducing the burdens on small businesses in our state.”

Tennessee Governor Bill Lee

Tennessee Governor Bill Lee

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American Heart Association says Young, Healthy People still vulnerable to Cardiovascular Disease if their LDL Cholesterol is high

 

American Heart Association Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Young, healthy people may still face a lifetime risk of premature death from cardiovascular disease if they cannot keep their cholesterol levels in check, according to new observational research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Researchers in this latest study looked at associations between low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and non-high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) thresholds and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality to evaluate whether people believed to be at low 10-year risk for heart health problems should begin pursuing efforts to lower elevated cholesterol earlier through lifestyle changes, and in some cases, cholesterol-lowering medication.

A study of more than 36,000 people followed for over two decades revealed that healthy individuals considered “low-risk” still died from cardiovascular disease if they had high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. (Ameircan Heart Association)

A study of more than 36,000 people followed for over two decades revealed that healthy individuals considered “low-risk” still died from cardiovascular disease if they had high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. (Ameircan Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Obesity in Young Women may set the stage for Heart Complications during and after Pregnancy

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationSan Antonio, TX – Even in young women, obesity may potentially lead to heart complications during and after pregnancy, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Basic Cardiovascular Sciences Scientific Sessions, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in basic cardiovascular science.  

Obesity is a risk factor for preeclampsia, a type of dangerous high blood pressure that can occur during the second half of pregnancy and leaves women more prone to high blood pressure and heart disease later in life.  

Obesity may potentially lead to preeclampsia, a form of dangerous high blood pressure that can occur during the second half of pregnancy. (American Heart Association)

Obesity may potentially lead to preeclampsia, a form of dangerous high blood pressure that can occur during the second half of pregnancy. (American Heart Association)

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