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American Heart Association says Black teens from Great Recession may have higher risk factors for Heart Disease, Diabetes

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – African-American teens who lived through the Great Recession of 2007-2009 may have higher risk of metabolic syndrome, a common cluster of risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers studied 328 African-Americans who had experienced the Great Recession of 2007-2009 as 16- and 17-year-olds living in nine rural counties in Georgia with high poverty rates and high rates of death from cardiovascular disease.

Black teens who lived through the Great Recession of 2007-2009 may have higher risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of several heart disease and diabetes risk factors. (American Heart Association)

Black teens who lived through the Great Recession of 2007-2009 may have higher risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of several heart disease and diabetes risk factors. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health says Vaccines are Not Just for Children

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Preventing an illness is always better than trying to treat it once it occurs. That’s why doctors with the Tennessee Department of Health encourage people of all ages to talk with their healthcare providers about the immunizations needed for lifelong protection.

“Vaccines aren’t just for kids. They provide protection against many potentially serious and preventable illnesses that can strike an individual, a family or a community without warning,” said TDH Commissioner John Dreyzehner, MD, MPH.

Immunizations Prevent Serious Illnesses throughout Life.

Immunizations Prevent Serious Illnesses throughout Life.

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American Heart Association says Breastfeeding may reduce a Mother’s Heart Attack and Stroke Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Breastfeeding is not only healthy for babies, it may also reduce a mother’s risk of having a heart attack or stroke later in life, according to new research published in of the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Previous studies have suggested that mothers get short-term health benefits from breastfeeding, such as weight loss and lower cholesterol, blood pressure and glucose levels after pregnancy.

A study of Chinese women found that the longer a mother breastfeeds, the greater the cardiovascular health benefit appears to be. (American Heart Association)

A study of Chinese women found that the longer a mother breastfeeds, the greater the cardiovascular health benefit appears to be. (American Heart Association)

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Too little sleep may raise risk of death in people with cluster of Heart Disease risk factors according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People with a common cluster of risk factors for heart disease and diabetes were approximately twice as likely to die of heart disease or stroke as people without the same set of risk factors if they failed to get more than six hours of sleep, according to a new observational study published in the association’s open access publication Journal of the American Heart Association. For those who got more sleep, the risk of death was more modest.

The study, funded in part by the American Heart Association, is the first to measure sleep duration in the laboratory rather than rely on patient reports and the first to examine the impact of sleep duration on the risk of death in those with a common cluster of heart disease risk factors.

Sleep and metabolic syndrome study. (American Heart Association)

Sleep and metabolic syndrome study. (American Heart Association)

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Nearly 1 in 5 with highest cardiac risk don’t think they need to improve health according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Nearly one in five people who reported the greatest number of cardiac risk factors did not believe they needed to improve their health, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

While most people in the study at the highest risk for a heart attack were more likely to agree on needed health improvements, more than half of those perceiving this need identified barriers to change, which were most commonly lack of self-discipline, work schedule and family responsibilities.

A Canadian study found that nearly one in five of those at highest risk for a heart attack did not believe they needed to improve their health. (American Heart Association)

A Canadian study found that nearly one in five of those at highest risk for a heart attack did not believe they needed to improve their health. (American Heart Association)

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Instant Peay Play: APSU Softball’s Allie Blackwood continues to beat the odds

 

Instant Peay Play - APSU SportsClarksville, TN – Legendary basketball coach John Wooden once said “Sports don’t build character, they reveal it.” And in the case of Austin Peay State University softball player Allie Blackwood no truer a statement could be said.

Four years ago, the Dalton, GA native came to Clarksville to pitcher for the Governors softball team and occasionally may see some time at first base and for two and a half years that is what happened.

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American Heart Association says Heart risks in Middle Age Boost Dementia Risk later in Life

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationHouston, TX – People who have heart disease risks in middle age – such as diabetes, high blood pressure or smoking – are at higher risk for dementia later in life, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017.

“The health of your vascular system in midlife is really important to the health of your brain when you are older,” said Rebecca F. Gottesman, M.D., Ph.D., lead researcher and associate professor of neurology and epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

Cardiovascular disease risk factors in midle age increase dementia risk later in life. Dementia was: 41% higher in smokers; 39% higher in people with high blood pressure; 77% higher in people with diabetes. (American Heart Association)

Cardiovascular disease risk factors in midle age increase dementia risk later in life. Dementia was: 41% higher in smokers; 39% higher in people with high blood pressure; 77% higher in people with diabetes. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Long-Term Heavy Drinking may Age Arteries over time

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Heavy alcohol drinking habits over the years may prematurely age arteries, especially in men, putting them at an increased risk for heart disease, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Drinking too much, can affect the elasticity of the arterial walls (arterial stiffness) and prematurely age the arteries, interfering with blood flow.

Heavy alcohol drinking habits over the years may prematurely age arteries, especially in men, putting them at an increased risk for heart disease, compared to consistently moderate drinkers. (American Heart Association)

Heavy alcohol drinking habits over the years may prematurely age arteries, especially in men, putting them at an increased risk for heart disease, compared to consistently moderate drinkers. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association warns Cardiovascular Disease Costs Will Exceed $1 Trillion by 2035

 

Nearly Half of Americans Will Develop Pre-existing CVD Conditions

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – A new study, released today by the American Heart Association, projects that by 2035, cardiovascular disease (CVD), the most costly and prevalent killer, if left unchecked, will place a crushing economic and health burden on the nation’s financial and health care systems.

According to the study, in the next two decades, the number of Americans with CVD will rise to 131.2 million – 45 percent of the total U.S. population – with costs expected to reach $1.1 trillion.

This is the American Heart Association's Salty Six Infographic highlighting six popular foods that can add high levels of sodium to your diet. They are bread and rolls, cold cuts, cured meat, pizza, poultry, soup, and sandwiches. (American Heart Association)

This is the American Heart Association’s Salty Six Infographic highlighting six popular foods that can add high levels of sodium to your diet. They are bread and rolls, cold cuts, cured meat, pizza, poultry, soup, and sandwiches. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health says Heart Disease Still Tennessee’s Top Cause of Death

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – While matters of the heart are top of mind near Valentine’s Day, more Tennesseans should think about them all year long to ensure healthier, longer lives.

Tennessee Department of Health data show heart disease is still the leading cause of death in the state, while stroke rated fifth in claiming lives.

Lifestyle Changes Can Save Lives

Lifestyle Changes Can Save Lives

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