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Topic: diabetes

American Heart Association reports Healthy Diet may reduce High Blood Pressure risk in Pregnancy-Related Diabetes

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women with pregnancy-related diabetes  (gestational diabetes) are at greater risk of developing high blood pressure later in life; however, a healthy diet may significantly reduce that risk, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Researchers studied 3,818 women with a history of pregnancy-related diabetes enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study II as a part of the ongoing Diabetes & Women’s Health Study. Over 22 years of follow-up, 1,069 women developed high blood pressure, which in turn increased their risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

A healthy diet may reduce the risk that women with pregnancy-related diabetes will develop high blood pressure later in life. (American Heart Association)

A healthy diet may reduce the risk that women with pregnancy-related diabetes will develop high blood pressure later in life. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Hispanics/Latinos at higher risk for Cardiac Dysfunction, Heart Failure

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Hispanics/Latinos have higher rates of cardiac dysfunction but are rarely aware they have the heart-pumping problem that can lead to heart failure, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Heart Failure.

Researchers found that about half of the 1,818 adults in their study of middle-aged and older Hispanics/Latinos had cardiac dysfunction, yet fewer than 1 in 20 participants knew they had a problem.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Statin use differs among Hispanic Adults at risk for Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In the United States, adults of different Hispanic/Latino backgrounds, at high risk for heart disease, varied significantly in their use of widely-prescribed cholesterol-lowering medications known as statins, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association. The difference was based on whether or not they had health insurance.

“These findings have important implications for preventing disparities in cardiovascular outcomes within the growing U.S. Hispanic/Latino population,” said study lead author Dima M. Qato, Pharm.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmacy systems, outcomes and policy at the University of Illinois in Chicago.

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health says Zika Virus Disease raises awareness about Preventing Birth Defects

 

Microcephaly One of Many Defects that Deserve Attention

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – Until a recent outbreak of Zika virus disease was associated with babies born with microcephaly, many had not heard of the birth defect. Tennessee Department of Health data show approximately 45 to 50 cases occur in Tennessee each year.

Babies with microcephaly are born with heads that are smaller than expected. This can be associated with developmental delays, intellectual disabilities, problems with hearing or vision and seizures.

A newborn baby gets caressed by its new mother

A newborn baby gets caressed by its new mother

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American Heart Association says a ten percent price change could prevent Heart Disease and Death

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPhoenix, AZ – A ten percent drop in price for healthy foods and a ten percent increase in the price of unhealthy foods could potentially prevent a significant number of people from dying from heart disease and stroke, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific 2016 meeting.

Decreasing the price of fruits, vegetables and grains by ten percent, while increasing the price of sugary drinks by ten percent, could prevent 515,000 deaths from cardiovascular disease over 20 years. (American Heart Association)

Decreasing the price of fruits, vegetables and grains by ten percent, while increasing the price of sugary drinks by ten percent, could prevent 515,000 deaths from cardiovascular disease over 20 years. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health says Healthy Hearts Need Activity in Winter Months

 

TDH Offers Suggestions to Improve Heart Health

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Heart disease is the number one killer of adults in Tennessee and among its primary causes are poor diets and a lack of adequate physical activity.

The Tennessee Department of Health reminds individuals the winter months demand increased attention for heart health because short days and cold weather prompt many of us to crave comfy couches and calorie-rich, feel-good foods.

Walking outdoors.

Walking outdoors.

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American Heart Association says African Americans, Hispanics face greater risk of Heart Failure

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – More than 915,000 Americans will be diagnosed with heart failure this year, according to the recently published American Heart Association 2016 Statistical Update.

Heart failure, a chronic, progressive condition in which the heart can’t pump blood efficiently to meet the body’s needs, is one of the most common heart diseases in the United States. In the next 15 years, the number of people living with the condition is expected to increase substantially – from 5.7 million to nearly 8 million by 2030 – and treatment costs will nearly double.

African Americans, Hispanics face greater risk of Heart Failure. (American Heart Association)

African Americans, Hispanics face greater risk of Heart Failure. (American Heart Association)

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American Stroke Association reports Pregnancy in older age increases Stroke, Heart Attack risk years later

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationLos Angeles, CA – Women who become pregnant at age 40 or older face a greater risk of stroke and heart attack later in life than women who become pregnant at a younger age, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2016.

“We already knew that older women were more likely than younger women to experience health problems during their pregnancy,” said Adnan I. Qureshi, M.D., lead researcher and director of the Zeenat Qureshi Stroke Institute in St. Cloud, Minnesota. “Now, we know that the consequences of that later pregnancy stretch years into the future.”

Women pregnant at age 40 or older face a greater risk of stroke and heart attack later in life than those pregnant at a younger age. (American Heart Association)

Women pregnant at age 40 or older face a greater risk of stroke and heart attack later in life than those pregnant at a younger age. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Older, Healthy Adults with systolic BP below 140 have Lower Stroke Risk

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Raising the systolic blood pressure threshold from 140 to 150 mmHg, as a new target for high blood pressure treatment in older people who don’t have chronic kidney disease or diabetes, could put this population at greater stroke risk, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

The increased stroke risk is even more pronounced among Hispanics and blacks, the research showed.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Health Department says Flu Season Has Arrived; Urges Prevention and Treatment

 

TDH Advises Getting Immunized Quickly if You Haven’t Already

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – The Tennessee Department of Health has been advised by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that reports of influenza are increasing across the country. TDH officials are asking all Tennesseans who have not yet had their annual flu vaccine to do so immediately, helping to protect themselves and to prevent the spread of the illness to others.

CDC and TDH also urge persons with flu-like illnesses who are at risk of severe illness with influenza due to some health conditions to seek care promptly to determine if treatment with influenza antiviral medications are needed.

A flu vaccination (CDC)

A flu vaccination (CDC)

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