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Topic: diet

American Heart Association Launches +color to Help Transform the American Diet

 

SUBWAY® Restaurants Joins the American Heart Association to Encourage All Americans To Add One More Cup of Color

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In a landmark nationwide effort, the American Heart Association (AHA) is announcing a new initiative called +color, focusing on the positive health impact of fruits and vegetables.

The health impact of +color may be simple yet significant: It is estimated that if Americans ate the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables every day, approximately 39,900 deaths would be prevented from cardiovascular diseases, stroke and diabetes and $7.6 billion in medical costs could be saved annually.[1],[2]

The American Heart Association (AHA) is announcing a new initiative called +color, focusing on the positive health impact of fruits and vegetables. (American Heart Association)

The American Heart Association (AHA) is announcing a new initiative called +color, focusing on the positive health impact of fruits and vegetables. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Internet and Mobile Devices prompt positive lifestyle changes

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People are more likely to adopt heart healthy behaviors when guided and encouraged via the Internet, their cellphones or other devices, according to 23 years of research reviewed in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

When guided by internet programs or mobile devices, people can become more physically active, eat better, lose a little weight and reduce tobacco and alcohol use. (American Heart Association)

When guided by internet programs or mobile devices, people can become more physically active, eat better, lose a little weight and reduce tobacco and alcohol use. (American Heart Association)

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Children should eat less than 25 grams of added Sugars daily according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children ages 2 to 18 should eat or drink less than six teaspoons of added sugars daily, according to the scientific statement recommending a specific limit on added sugars for children, published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Six teaspoons of added sugars is equivalent to about 100 calories or 25 grams.

“Our target recommendation is the same for all children between the ages of 2 and 18 to keep it simple for parents and public health advocates,” said Miriam Vos, M.D., Ms.P.H, lead author, nutrition scientist and associate professor of pediatrics at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia.

Healthy kids are sweet enough. Kids age 2-18 should have less than 25 grams or six teaspoons of added sugar daily for a healthy heart. (American Heart Association)

Healthy kids are sweet enough. Kids age 2-18 should have less than 25 grams or six teaspoons of added sugar daily for a healthy heart. (American Heart Association)

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Gallstone Disease may increase Heart Disease Risk reports American Heart Association

 

Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A history of gallstone disease may increase your risk of coronary heart disease, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology.

Gallstone disease is one of the most common and costly gastrointestinal disorders in the United States. Gallstone disease and coronary heart disease have similar risk factors, including diabetes, obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and poor diet.

A history of gallstone disease was linked to a 23 percent increased risk of developing coronary heart disease. (American Heart Association)

A history of gallstone disease was linked to a 23 percent increased risk of developing coronary heart disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Factors associated with good Heart Health may also protect Kidneys

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Achieving the American Heart Association’s definition of ideal cardiovascular health may also help prevent chronic kidney disease, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Life’s Simple 7 are the ideal cardiovascular health factors/goals that include healthy blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar, diet, body weight, enough physical activity and not smoking.

Casey M. Rebholz, PhD, MS, MPH; Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Fred Dubs/American Heart Association)

Casey M. Rebholz, PhD, MS, MPH; Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Fred Dubs/American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Yogurt may protect Women from developing High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPhoenix, AZ – Women who ate five or more servings of yogurt per week had a lower risk of developing high blood pressure compared to those who rarely ate yogurt, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific Sessions.

“No one food is a magic bullet but adding yogurt to an otherwise healthy diet seems to help reduce the long-term risk of high blood pressure in women,” said Justin Buendia, lead author of the study and a Ph.D. candidate at Boston University School of Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts.

Yogurt LowFat plain in cup with spoon verticle. (American Heart Association)

Yogurt LowFat plain in cup with spoon verticle. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Obese Kids young as age 8 show signs of Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – Imaging tests of obese children — some as young as 8 years old —  showed signs of significant heart disease and heart muscle abnormalities, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Comparing 20 obese kids with 20 normal-weight kids, researchers found that obesity was linked to 27 percent more muscle mass in the left ventricle of their hearts and 12 percent thicker heart muscles – both signs of heart disease.

Child weighing himself on a scale. (American Heart Association)

Child weighing himself on a scale. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Eating more Fruits, Veggies in Youth linked to Healthy Heart decades later

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Eating more fruits and vegetables as a young adult may keep your arteries free of heart disease 20 years later, according to research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Researchers found that eating more fruits and vegetables as young adults was associated with less calcified coronary artery plaque 20 years later. Coronary artery calcium can be measured by a CT scan to detect the presence and amount of atherosclerosis, a disease that hardens arteries and underlies many types of heart disease.

Farmers' market produce stand showing assorted fruits and vegetables. (American Heart Association)

Farmers’ market produce stand showing assorted fruits and vegetables. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says the result of eating too much Salt can be measured in Blood Pressure

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People who gradually increase the amount of salt in their diet and people who habitually eat a higher salt diet both face an increased risk of developing high blood pressure, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

In a Japanese study of more than 4,000 people who had normal blood pressure, almost 23 percent developed high blood pressure over a three year period. Those who ate the most salt were the most likely to have high blood pressure by the end of the study. Participants who gradually increased their sodium intake also showed gradually higher blood pressure.

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

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Clarksville Center for Audiology says Healthier Diet May Help Preserve Your Hearing

 

Clarksville Center for AudiologyClarksville, TN – It’s well known that healthy eating habits can promote better overall health within the body, as well as alleviate a number of diet-related illnesses and diseases.

According to a new examination of the eating habits of 2,366 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey participants, those who eat more fruits and vegetables might also have better hearing — even if they’re exposed to more noise.

Eatting more fruits and vegetables may help you hear better.

Eatting more fruits and vegetables may help you hear better.

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