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Topic: diet

American Heart Association reports Factors associated with good Heart Health may also protect Kidneys

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Achieving the American Heart Association’s definition of ideal cardiovascular health may also help prevent chronic kidney disease, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Life’s Simple 7 are the ideal cardiovascular health factors/goals that include healthy blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar, diet, body weight, enough physical activity and not smoking.

Casey M. Rebholz, PhD, MS, MPH; Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Fred Dubs/American Heart Association)

Casey M. Rebholz, PhD, MS, MPH; Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Fred Dubs/American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Yogurt may protect Women from developing High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPhoenix, AZ – Women who ate five or more servings of yogurt per week had a lower risk of developing high blood pressure compared to those who rarely ate yogurt, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific Sessions.

“No one food is a magic bullet but adding yogurt to an otherwise healthy diet seems to help reduce the long-term risk of high blood pressure in women,” said Justin Buendia, lead author of the study and a Ph.D. candidate at Boston University School of Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts.

Yogurt LowFat plain in cup with spoon verticle. (American Heart Association)

Yogurt LowFat plain in cup with spoon verticle. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Obese Kids young as age 8 show signs of Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – Imaging tests of obese children — some as young as 8 years old —  showed signs of significant heart disease and heart muscle abnormalities, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Comparing 20 obese kids with 20 normal-weight kids, researchers found that obesity was linked to 27 percent more muscle mass in the left ventricle of their hearts and 12 percent thicker heart muscles – both signs of heart disease.

Child weighing himself on a scale. (American Heart Association)

Child weighing himself on a scale. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Eating more Fruits, Veggies in Youth linked to Healthy Heart decades later

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Eating more fruits and vegetables as a young adult may keep your arteries free of heart disease 20 years later, according to research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Researchers found that eating more fruits and vegetables as young adults was associated with less calcified coronary artery plaque 20 years later. Coronary artery calcium can be measured by a CT scan to detect the presence and amount of atherosclerosis, a disease that hardens arteries and underlies many types of heart disease.

Farmers' market produce stand showing assorted fruits and vegetables. (American Heart Association)

Farmers’ market produce stand showing assorted fruits and vegetables. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says the result of eating too much Salt can be measured in Blood Pressure

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People who gradually increase the amount of salt in their diet and people who habitually eat a higher salt diet both face an increased risk of developing high blood pressure, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

In a Japanese study of more than 4,000 people who had normal blood pressure, almost 23 percent developed high blood pressure over a three year period. Those who ate the most salt were the most likely to have high blood pressure by the end of the study. Participants who gradually increased their sodium intake also showed gradually higher blood pressure.

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

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Clarksville Center for Audiology says Healthier Diet May Help Preserve Your Hearing

 

Clarksville Center for AudiologyClarksville, TN – It’s well known that healthy eating habits can promote better overall health within the body, as well as alleviate a number of diet-related illnesses and diseases.

According to a new examination of the eating habits of 2,366 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey participants, those who eat more fruits and vegetables might also have better hearing — even if they’re exposed to more noise.

Eatting more fruits and vegetables may help you hear better.

Eatting more fruits and vegetables may help you hear better.

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American Heart Association says Semi-Veggie Diet effectively Lowers Heart Disease, Stroke Risk

 

American Heart AssociationBaltimore, MD – A pro-vegetarian diet – one that has a higher proportion of plant-based foods compared to animal-based foods is linked to lower risks of dying from heart disease and stroke, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association EPI/Lifestyle 2015 meeting.

In an observational study, researchers analyzed the eating and lifestyle habits of 451,256 Europeans. People who ate the most pro-vegetarian style diets (≥70 percent of food coming from plant sources) had a 20 percent lower risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, compared to those who were the least pro-vegetarian (<45 percent).

American Heart Association says Semi-Veggie Diet effectively Lowers Heart Disease, Stroke Risk

American Heart Association says Semi-Veggie Diet effectively Lowers Heart Disease, Stroke Risk

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American Heart Association and American Stroke Association – Life is Why

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For the first time in the 50 years that the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association has released an annual snapshot of heart disease and stroke statistics in the U.S., the new report adds a global view.

Health data compiled from more than 190 countries show heart disease remains the No. 1 global cause of death with 17.3 million deaths each year, according to “Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics — 2015 Update: A Report From the American Heart Association.” That number is expected to rise to more than 23.6 million by 2030, the report found.

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Consumer Reports lays down the facts about Gluten

 

CR survey finds 63% of Americans believe a gluten-free diet would improve physical or mental health—but cutting gluten isn’t always more nutritious or better for most people

Consumer ReportsYonkers, NY – Gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye, has become the latest dietary villain, blamed for everything from forgetfulness to joint pain to weight gain.  But Consumer Reports (CR) is shedding light on common misconceptions about going gluten-free.

The report points out that a gluten-free claim doesn’t mean the product is necessarily more nutritious, it may actually be less so; that consumers may increase their exposure to arsenic by going gluten-free, and a gluten-free diet might cause weight gain—not weight loss. And, most gluten-free foods cost more than their regular counterparts. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Long-term benefits of popular Diets are less than evident

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Popular commercial diets can help you lose some weight in the short term, but keeping the weight off after the first year and the diet’s impact on heart health are unclear, according to a study published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

Nearly 70 percent of American adults are overweight or obese – and therefore at higher risk for health problems such as heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure and diabetes. Whether a diet will be effective is an important public health question. «Read the rest of this article»

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