Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: diet

American Heart Association says Insomnia may significantly increase Stroke Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The risk of stroke may be much higher in people with insomnia compared to those who don’t have trouble sleeping, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Stroke.

The risk also seems to be far greater when insomnia occurs as a young adult compared to those who are older, said researchers who reviewed the randomly-selected health records of more than 21,000 people with insomnia and 64,000 non-insomniacs in Taiwan.

Stroke and  insomnia - HSU study.  (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

FDA Targets Trans Fat in Processed Foods

 

U.S. Food and Drug Administration - FDA

Silver Spring, MD – More than decade ago, a sea change began in the American diet, with consumers starting to avoid foods with trans fat and companies responding by reducing the amount of trans fat in their products.

This evolution began when FDA first proposed in 1999 that manufacturers be required to declare the amount of trans fat on Nutrition Facts labels because of public health concerns. That requirement became effective in 2006.

FDA Targets Trans Fat in Processed Foods

FDA Targets Trans Fat in Processed Foods

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Healthcare Providers encouraged to aggressively treat unhealthy lifestyles

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX - Healthcare providers should treat unhealthy behaviors as aggressively as they treat high blood pressure, cholesterol and other heart disease risk factors, according to an American Heart Association science advisory published in Circulation.

“We’re talking about a paradigm shift from only treating biomarkers — physical indicators of a person’s risk for heart disease — to helping people change unhealthy behaviors, such as smoking, unhealthy body weight, poor diet quality and lack of physical activity,” said Bonnie Spring, Ph.D., lead author of the statement and a professor of preventive medicine and psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University in Chicago.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association says Elevated blood pressure increasing among Children, Adolescents

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The risk of elevated blood pressure among children and adolescents rose 27 percent during a thirteen-year period, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension.

Higher body mass, larger waistlines and eating excess sodium may be the reasons for the elevated blood pressure readings, researchers said.

High blood pressure is a risk factor for stroke, heart disease and kidney failure — accounting for about 350,000 preventable deaths a year in the United States.

Obesity and excess salt are associated with elevated blood pressure in children ages 8-17. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Obesity and excess salt are associated with elevated blood pressure in children ages 8-17. (Copyright American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Consumers Union presses FDA to end delays in limiting Arsenic Exposure through Food, Beverages

 

Consumers UnionWashington, D.C. – Consumers Union, the public policy and advocacy division of Consumer Reports, today sent a letter to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to express “deep concern” about the delays in the FDA’s work to limit consumers’ exposure to arsenic through food and beverages.

The group wrote, “We strongly urge the Agency to do all it can to ensure the release of its final guidance on arsenic in fruit juice so that consumers can begin to reduce their exposure to this contaminant.  We also urge the Agency to publicly release the results of its arsenic testing of 1,000 rice and rice product samples.  The release of these data will add to our understanding of consumer exposure to arsenic in rice, and we hope that it will also form the basis for FDA action to reduce the amount of arsenic in our diets.” «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

ShopSmart’s Secrets for Sunburn Relief

 

Remedies that can help heal and those not worth the money

ShopSmart MagazineYonkers, NY – There’s no cure for a sunburn, but there are ways to minimize the misery.  The July 2013 issue of ShopSmart magazine, from Consumer Reports, highlights effective treatments that can help heal after a sunburn and identifies products to avoid when scorched by the sun.

“Don’t get burned twice!” said Lisa Lee Freeman, editor-in-chief of ShopSmart.  “Some sunburn products may do more harm than good.”

Protect yourself from the Summer Sun.

Protect yourself from the Summer Sun.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Diet, ‘anti-aging’ supplements may help reverse blood vessel abnormality

 

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – A diet low in grains, beans and certain vegetables — combined with “anti-aging” supplements — improved blood vessel function, in a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 2013 Scientific Sessions.

The blood vessel abnormality, or endothelial dysfunction, occurs when cells lining the interior wall of blood vessels malfunction. It’s a serious condition that’s often one of the first signs of heart disease. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association says alternative therapies may help lower blood pressure

 

Due to their modest effects, alternative therapies can be used with — not as a replacement for — standard treatment.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Alternative therapies such as aerobic exercise, resistance or strength training, and isometric hand grip exercises may help reduce your blood pressure, according to the American Heart Association.

In a new scientific statement published in its journal Hypertension, the association said alternative approaches could help people with blood pressure levels higher than 120/80 mm Hg and those who can’t tolerate or don’t respond well to standard medications.

Blood Pressure Check. (American Heart Association)

Blood Pressure Check. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says drinking cup of beetroot juice daily may help lower blood pressure

 

Increasing intake of foods rich in dietary nitrate may be an affordable and attainable way to manage blood pressure, researchers said.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A cup of beetroot juice a day may help reduce your blood pressure, according to a small study in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension.

People with high blood pressure who drank about 8 ounces of beetroot juice experienced a decrease in blood pressure of about 10 mm Hg. But the preliminary findings don’t yet suggest that supplementing your diet with beetroot juice benefits your health, researchers said.

Beetroot juice contains dietary nitrate, which may help relax blood vessel walls and improve blood flow. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Beetroot juice contains dietary nitrate, which may help relax blood vessel walls and improve blood flow. (Copyright American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says adolescents’ poor health behaviors raise risk of heart disease as adults

 

More than 80 percent of them had a poor diet and many were not physically active.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – U.S. adolescents’ high levels of poor health behaviors and unfavorable cardiovascular risk factors may increase their chances of heart disease as adults, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Researchers estimated the current state of cardiovascular health of U.S. adolescents based on the seven cardiovascular health components defined in the American Heart Association’s 2020 impact goals, which include both health behaviors and factors: blood pressure, total cholesterol, body mass index (BMI), blood glucose, healthy diet, physical activity and smoking. The 4,673 adolescents were 12-to 19-years-old and represented about 33.2 million adolescents nationally.

Poor diet in adolescents can raise risk of heart disease later in life. (American Heart Association)

Poor diet in adolescents can raise risk of heart disease later in life. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Page 1 of 512345

Personal Controls

Archives