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APSU Baseball’s Dre Gleason becomes first Gov named to Golden Spikes Watch List

 

APSU Sports Information

APSU BaseballDurham, NC – Austin Peay State University senior first baseman Dre Gleason was named to the 40-player midseason Golden Spikes Award Watch List, Wednesday, by USA Baseball.

It is the first time a Governors athlete has been named to the watch list for the Golden Spikes Award, presented annually to the top amateur baseball player in the country.

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American Heart Association says Playing Pokémon Go may help people reach 10,000 daily steps goal

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPortland, OR – Playing the popular smartphone game Pokémon Go may increase people’s daily steps, especially among young adults with low physical activity levels or those who are overweight or obese, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention / Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2017 Scientific Sessions.

In Pokémon Go, a location-based augmented reality game, players move around a physical location capturing animated creatures on smartphones and other mobile devices. Pokémon Go has generated a great deal of interest since it was released in July 2016, but few studies have examined whether playing the game can increase an individual’s level of physical activity.

When guided by internet programs or mobile devices, people can become more physically active, eat better, lose a little weight and reduce tobacco and alcohol use. (American Heart Association)

When guided by internet programs or mobile devices, people can become more physically active, eat better, lose a little weight and reduce tobacco and alcohol use. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Coordinated Response cuts time to treatment for deadly Heart Attacks

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – When emergency medical services (EMS) and hospital providers worked together in a coordinated system, people suffering deadly heart attacks received life-saving treatment sooner, according to a new study in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Often considered the most deadly type of heart attack, ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, or STEMI, happens when the blood supply to the heart is completely blocked. Quickly opening the blocked artery can restore normal blood flow, minimize heart damage and save lives.

Treatment response times improved the most when patients were taken by EMS directly to hospitals that could perform the procedure to open blocked heart arteries. (American Heart Association)

Treatment response times improved the most when patients were taken by EMS directly to hospitals that could perform the procedure to open blocked heart arteries. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Stress management may enhance Cardiac Rehab, Improve Recovery

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Heart patients may benefit from cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) programs even more when stress management is added, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Cardiac rehabilitation programs do not routinely offer stress management, but this may change should demand increase. And because patients may be reluctant to ask for the programs themselves, the onus is on the physicians to recognize that stress management is important for the optimal medical management of patients,” said James A. Blumenthal, Ph.D., professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina.

Adding stress management into cardiac rehabilitation programs should be encouraged, researchers say. (American Heart Association)

Adding stress management into cardiac rehabilitation programs should be encouraged, researchers say. (American Heart Association)

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NASA Study reveals Natural Cycles are not enough to explain Global Warming

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – A study by scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, shows, in detail, the reason why global temperatures remain stable in the long run unless they are pushed by outside forces, such as increased greenhouse gases due to human impacts.

Lead author Patrick Brown, a doctoral student at Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment, and his JPL colleagues combined global climate models with satellite measurements of changes in the energy approaching and leaving Earth at the top of the atmosphere over the past 15 years.

Earth's atmosphere viewed from the International Space Station. A NASA/Duke University study provides new evidence that natural cycles alone aren't sufficient to explain the global atmospheric warming observed over the last century. (NASA)

Earth’s atmosphere viewed from the International Space Station. A NASA/Duke University study provides new evidence that natural cycles alone aren’t sufficient to explain the global atmospheric warming observed over the last century. (NASA)

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American Heart Association reports Women, Men with Heart Failure both benefit from Implanted Defibrillators

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women with heart failure benefit from implantable cardiac defibrillators as much as men, according to new research in Circulation: Heart Failure, an American Heart Association journal.

“Despite current guidelines recommending that health practitioners consider adding these devices to standard heart failure treatments in both women and men, women with heart failure have been less likely to receive defibrillators. These new data reinforce the existing gender-neutral guidelines,” said Emily Zeitler, M.D., lead author of the study and a cardiology and research fellow at the Duke Clinical Research Institute in Durham, North Carolina.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says African-Americans with Depression more likely to have Strokes, Heart Attack

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – African Americans with major depressive symptoms – perceived stress, neuroticism, life dissatisfaction – had almost twice the increased risk of stroke and coronary heart disease, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Quality and Outcomes.

While depression is recognized as a consequence of stroke and coronary heart disease, a common term for the buildup of plaque in the heart’s arteries that could lead to heart attack, most studies have been conducted in white populations. «Read the rest of this article»

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NASA’s AcrimSat spacecraft has quit responding after 14 years of service

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – After 14 years of monitoring Earth’s main energy source, radiation from the sun, NASA’s Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor satellite has lost contact with its ground operations team at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, and its mission has been declared completed.

AcrimSat’s ACRIM 3 instrument was the third in a series of satellite experiments that have contributed to a critical data set for understanding Earth’s climate: the 36-year, continuous satellite record of variations in total solar radiation reaching Earth, or total solar irradiance.

Artist's rendering of the AcrimSat spacecraft. (NASA)

Artist’s rendering of the AcrimSat spacecraft. (NASA)

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Nashville Sounds lose late to Round Rock Express at Greer Stadium, 6-4

 

Nashville Sounds Baseball

Nashville’s Jason Rogers Goes 3-for-4 With Home Run and Three RBIs

Nashville SoundsNashville, TN – The first-place Nashville Sounds (51-47) failed to complete a three-game series sweep over the Round Rock Express Sunday night, losing the finale 6-4 at Greer Stadium.

Infielder Jason Rogers powered the Sounds’ offense, going 3-for-4 and delivering the game-tying three-run home run in the 5th inning, but the Sounds would not score again.

Nashville Sounds Baseball

Nashville Sounds Baseball

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APSU Governor’s Alex Robles named to Baseball America Freshman All-America squad

 

Written by Cody Bush
Austin Peay Sports Information Office

Austin Peay State University Governors - APSUDurham, NC – Austin Peay State University baseball standout freshman Alex Robles earned his third Freshman All-America honor, Monday, as he was named to the 2014 Baseball America Freshman All-America First Team.

The honor joins Robles’ First-Team Freshman All-America selection by the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association.

Freshman Alex Robles was named to the 2014 Baseball America Freshman All-America Team, Monday. (Brittney Sparn/APSU Sports Information)

Freshman Alex Robles was named to the 2014 Baseball America Freshman All-America Team, Monday. (Brittney Sparn/APSU Sports Information)

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