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Topic: Eclipse

Clarksville is prime location for the Great American Eclipse

 

Clarksville-Montgomery County Residents must take precautions during August 21st event

City of Clarksville - Clarksville, TNClarksville, TN – Clarksville-Montgomery County is in the path of the Great American Eclipse of August 21st, 2017, making this a prime destination for those who want to view this rare astronomical  occurrence.

This  will be the first coast-to-coast eclipse in 98 years and the first in the continental United States since 1978.  The eclipse can only be seen in a path 60 miles wide across the United States, so this will be a once in a lifetime experience to to witness a fascinating natural phenomenon.

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APSU PeayClipse talk on “The Secret Lives of Astronomers” at Clarksville’s next Movies in the Park

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – As part of the ongoing PeayClipse lecture series, Austin Peay State University faculty member Dr. J. Allyn Smith will present a talk titled, “The Secret Lives of Astronomers” at 7:00pm on July 22nd, 2017 during the City of Clarksville’s Movies in the Park Series, at McGregor Park.

The talk will take place prior to the evening’s featured film, “The Secret Lives of Pets.”

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Nashville Sounds, Mayor’s Office announce Total Solar Eclipse Viewing Party

 

Nashville Sounds

Nashville SoundsNashville, TN – The Nashville Sounds, in conjunction with Nashville Mayor Megan Barry, Metro Government, the Metro Sports Authority, and the Adventure Science Center, have announced the festivities for the total solar eclipse viewing party at First Tennessee Park on Monday, August 21st, 2017.

For the first time since 1918, a total solar eclipse will sweep across the United States and Nashville is the largest city in its path.

The event will include music from the Nashville Symphony, science demonstrations with fun, hands-on activities from the Adventure Science Center, total solar eclipse viewing, and a separate Sounds baseball game to follow at 4:05pm.

First Tennessee Park to Host Viewing Party and Sounds Game August 21st.

First Tennessee Park to Host Viewing Party and Sounds Game August 21st.

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APSU PeayClipse talk on “Telling Time and Telling Tales: Eclipses in Ancient Greece” to be featured at Clarksville’s Movies in the Park

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – As part of the ongoing PeayClipse lecture series, Austin Peay State University faculty members Tim and Mary Winters will present a talk titled, “Telling Time and Telling Tales: Eclipses in Ancient Greece,” at 7:00pm on July 15th, 2017 during the city of Clarksville’s Movies in the Park Series, at Heritage Park.

They will talk before that evening’s featured film, “Finding Dory.”

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NASA prepares Satellites for alignment of Planets and Stars

 

Written by Mara Johnson-Groh
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – The movements of the stars and the planets have almost no impact on life on Earth, but a few times per year, the alignment of celestial bodies has a visible effect.

One of these geometric events — the spring equinox — is just around the corner, and another major alignment — a total solar eclipse — will be visible across America on August 21st, with a fleet of NASA satellites viewing it from space and providing images of the event.

To understand the basics of celestial alignments, here is information on equinoxes, solstices, full moons, eclipses and transits:

During a transit, a planet passes in between us and the star it orbits. This method is commonly used to find new exoplanets in our galaxy. (NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Genna Duberstein)

During a transit, a planet passes in between us and the star it orbits. This method is commonly used to find new exoplanets in our galaxy. (NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Genna Duberstein)

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Land Between the Lakes Camping Reservations Available for Eclipse 2017

 

Land Between the Lakes - LBLLand Between the Lakes, KY/TN – Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area has opened the camping reservation system to accept early reservations for August 14th-August 23rd, 2017. A total solar eclipse will occur in the region on Monday, August 21st, 2017.

“We want to support our local communities and visitors who want to be here to experience this unusual astronomical event,” says Jeff Laird, Customer Service Manager at Land Between the Lakes.

LBL's Wranglers Campground. (Land Between the Lakes)

LBL’s Wranglers Campground. (Land Between the Lakes)

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NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory sees Earth and Moon in Double Eclipse

 

Written by Lina Tran
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – Early in the morning of September 1st, 2016, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, caught both Earth and the moon crossing in front of the sun. SDO keeps a constant eye on the sun, but during SDO’s semiannual eclipse seasons, Earth briefly blocks SDO’s line of sight each day – a consequence of SDO’s geosynchronous orbit.

On September 1st, Earth completely eclipsed the sun from SDO’s perspective just as the moon began its journey across the face of the sun. The end of the Earth eclipse happened just in time for SDO to catch the final stages of the lunar transit.

You can tell Earth and the moon’s shadows apart by their edges: Earth’s is fuzzy, while the moon’s is sharp and distinct. This is because Earth’s atmosphere absorbs some of the sun’s light, creating an ill-defined edge. On the other hand, the moon has no atmosphere, producing a crisp horizon. (NASA/SDO)

You can tell Earth and the moon’s shadows apart by their edges: Earth’s is fuzzy, while the moon’s is sharp and distinct. This is because Earth’s atmosphere absorbs some of the sun’s light, creating an ill-defined edge. On the other hand, the moon has no atmosphere, producing a crisp horizon.
(NASA/SDO)

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APSU Students to launch High-Altitude Balloon during 2017 Eclipse

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Almost like dominoes toppling over, only in reverse, a line of high-altitude balloons will gradually rise into the late summer sky, from Oregon to South Carolina, on August 21st, 2017.

That afternoon, the shadow of a total solar eclipse will traverse the entire country, and as it nears Clarksville, a team of Austin Peay State University students will release their own helium-filled inflatable.

Austin Peay Physics students Mary Sencabaugh, Jacob Robertson, Megan McCracken and Dominic Critchlow prepare the ground system they built to track the high altitude balloon they will release during the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse. (APSU)

Austin Peay Physics students Mary Sencabaugh, Jacob Robertson, Megan McCracken and Dominic Critchlow prepare the ground system they built to track the high altitude balloon they will release during the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse. (APSU)

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NASA research shows moon Io’s atmosphere collapsing when in Jupiter’s Shadow

 

NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Jupiter’s volcanic moon Io has a thin atmosphere that collapses in the shadow of Jupiter, condensing as ice, according to a new study by NASA-funded researchers. The study reveals the freezing effects of Jupiter’s shadow during daily eclipses on the moon’s volcanic gases.

“This research is the first time scientists have observed this remarkable phenomenon directly, improving our understanding of this geologically active moon,” said Constantine Tsang, a scientist at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. The study was published August 2nd in the Journal of Geophysical Research.

Artist’s concept of the atmospheric collapse of Jupiter’s volcanic moon Io, which is eclipsed by Jupiter for two hours of each day (1.7 Earth days). The resulting temperature drop freezes sulfur dioxide gas, causing the atmosphere to “deflate,” as seen in the shadowed area on the left. (SwRI/Andrew Blanchard)

Artist’s concept of the atmospheric collapse of Jupiter’s volcanic moon Io, which is eclipsed by Jupiter for two hours of each day (1.7 Earth days). The resulting temperature drop freezes sulfur dioxide gas, causing the atmosphere to “deflate,” as seen in the shadowed area on the left. (SwRI/Andrew Blanchard)

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NASA sets the stage for upcoming Super Harvest Moon Eclipse

 

Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – In the days before light bulbs, farmers relied on moonlight to help them harvest their crops. Many crops ripen all at once in late summer and early autumn so farmers found themselves extremely busy at this time of year. They had to work after sundown. Moonlight became an essential part of farming, and thus, the Harvest Moon was born.

According to folklore, the Harvest Moon is the full Moon that falls closest to the autumnal equinox, the hectic beginning of northern autumn. In 2015, the Moon is full on September 28th, less than a week after the equinox of September 23rd. The coincidence sets the stage for a nice display of harvest moonlight.

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