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NASA’s Aura satellite celebrates it’s 10th Year analyzing Earth’s Climate System

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Nitrogen and oxygen make up nearly 99 percent of Earth’s atmosphere. The remaining one percent is comprised of gases that — although present in small concentrations — can have a big impact on life on Earth.

Trace gases called greenhouse gases warm the surface, making it habitable for humans, plants and animals. But these greenhouse gases, as well as clouds and tiny particles called aerosols in the atmosphere, also play vital roles in Earth’s complex climate system.

NASA's 10-year-old Aura satellite, which studies Earth's atmosphere, continues to help scientists understand Earth's changing climate. (NASA)

NASA’s 10-year-old Aura satellite, which studies Earth’s atmosphere, continues to help scientists understand Earth’s changing climate. (NASA)

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Volkswagen to produce New midsize SUV in Chattanooga Tennessee

 

Approximately 2,000 additional jobs to be created

VolkswagenWolfsburg, Germany – Within the framework of its Strategy 2018 plan, the Volkswagen Group is expanding its industrial footprint in the US. The Board of Directors of Volkswagen Group of America has decided to award the production of the new midsize SUV to the Chattanooga plant in Tennessee.

The Group will be investing a total of approximately US$900 million (€643 million) in the production of a newly developed, seven-passenger SUV, and creating 2,000 additional jobs in the US. About US$600 million (€432 million) will be invested in Tennessee.

New midsize SUV from Volkswagen to be produced in Chattanooga [Concept car shown]. (©Volkswagen of America, Inc.)

New midsize SUV from Volkswagen to be produced in Chattanooga [Concept car shown]. (©Volkswagen of America, Inc.)

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Fort Campbell’s Blanchfield Army Community Hospital earns safety recognition

 

Blanchfield Army Hospital - BACH - Fort Campbell KYFort Campbell, KY – Blanchfield Army Community Hospital (BACH) earned the Army’s Safety and Occupational Health “Star Status” designation for safety following an on-site review May 27th-30th.

“Workplace safety is critical for organizations across the Army; however it is especially critical in a medical environment,” said BACH commander Col. George N. Appenzeller. He explained that worksite safety helps ensure employees and patients are protected from a variety of potential serious hazards in clinical operations.

Blanchfield Army Community Hospital occupational health nurse Kay Wombacher spoke to Concurrent Technologies Corporation senior safety professional David Caswell May 30 as part of the audit performed by the MEDCOM Safety Management team. (U.S. Army - Laura Boyd)

Blanchfield Army Community Hospital occupational health nurse Kay Wombacher spoke to Concurrent Technologies Corporation senior safety professional David Caswell May 30 as part of the audit performed by the MEDCOM Safety Management team. (U.S. Army – Laura Boyd)

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Second Quarter ends Strong, but Investors remain Cautious

 

F&M Investment Services - Raymond James - Clarksville, TNClarksville, TN – While the markets managed solid gains over the last three months, investors continue to measure their enthusiasm as the U.S. economy maintains a less-than-robust growth trend heading into the second half of the year.

After a hesitant start to 2014, the markets gained momentum as the winter doldrums gave way to slow spring growth. But ever-present concerns over the Fed’s imminent move to wind down its quantitative easing program and eventually raise rates again have kept stock market euphoria at bay.

Frazier Allen

Frazier Allen

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NASA’s QuikScat satellite to be used to calibrate it’s successor RapidScat

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – June 19th marked the 15th anniversary of the launch of NASA’s QuikScat, a satellite sent for a three-year mission in 1999 that continues collecting data. Built in less than 12 months, QuikScat has watched ocean wind patterns for 15 years and improved weather forecasting worldwide. Despite a partial instrument failure in 2009, it provides calibration data to international partners.

On this anniversary, the mission’s team is calibrating ISS-RapidScat, the successor that will maintain QuikScat’s unbroken data record. After its launch in a few months, RapidScat will watch ocean winds from the International Space Station (ISS) for a two-year mission.

Using data from NASA's QuikScat, weather forecasters were able to predict hazardous weather events over oceans 6 to 12 hours earlier than before these data were available. Orange areas show where winds are blowing the hardest and blue shows relatively light winds. (NASA)

Using data from NASA’s QuikScat, weather forecasters were able to predict hazardous weather events over oceans 6 to 12 hours earlier than before these data were available. Orange areas show where winds are blowing the hardest and blue shows relatively light winds. (NASA)

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Inner Voices at Clarksville’s Customs House Museum beginning July 3rd

 

Clarksville's Customs House Museum and Cultural CenterClarksville, TN – International artist Paul Harmon exhibits his lyrical paintings in the Customs House Museum’s Crouch Gallery beginning July 3rd.

The themes of Harmon’s paintings always incorporate poetry, prose and ideas from the artist’s interests and experiences.

Paul Harmon exhibits begins July 3rd at the Customs House Museum.

Paul Harmon exhibits begins July 3rd at the Customs House Museum.

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Austin Peay State University Botanical Garden showcases area’s rare and endangered plants

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – A few years ago, three tall, flowering cherry trees grew on the western side of Austin Peay State University’s Sundquist Science Complex. They provided a nice, welcoming entry into the building, but in 2007, Tennessee suffered from a record-setting drought.

Temperatures reached 113 degrees Fahrenheit that summer, and by the fall, the 20-foot tall trees were dead.

Austin Peay Botanical Garden. (APSU)

Austin Peay Botanical Garden. (APSU)

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Tennessee Department of Health is raising Awareness about Chikungunya

 

Tennessee Department of Health - TDOHNashville, TN – The Tennessee Department of Health is investigating the first potential cases of chikungunya in the state. Multiple people from Tennessee recently traveled to the Caribbean, where the illness is now a widespread epidemic with over 100,000 suspected cases.

Some of the recent travelers from Tennessee now have symptoms of the illness.

Chikungunya is transmitted by daytime biting mosquitoes.

Chikungunya is transmitted by daytime biting mosquitoes.

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Nashville Zoo to host Conservation Lecture Thursday, June 5th

 

Nashville ZooNashville, TN – Nashville Zoo is pleased to present Keepers of the Wild, an evening lecture with wildlife photographer Christian Sperka on Thursday, June 5th at 6:00pm. The presentation featuring Sperka’s images will take place in the Zoo’s Croft Center and is free to the public.

Sperka has spent the past two years working as a field guide and wildlife photograph er at the Thanda Private Game Reserve in Northern Kwazulu Natal, South Africa. His lecture will focus on the conservation efforts and challenges of a private game reserve in South Africa and the rising threat to Africa’s rhino population. «Read the rest of this article»

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West Antarctic Ice Sheet unstoppable loss not unexpected by NASA Scientists

 

Written by Patrick Lynch
NASA’s Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – The new finding that the eventual loss of a major section of West Antarctica’s ice sheet “appears unstoppable” was not completely unexpected by scientists who study this area.

The study, led by glaciologist Eric Rignot at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, and the University of California, Irvine, follows decades of research and theory suggesting the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is inherently vulnerable to change.

Although the Amundsen Sea region is only a fraction of the whole West Antarctic Ice Sheet, the region contains enough ice to raise global sea levels by 4 feet (1.2 meters). (NASA/GSFC/SVS)

Although the Amundsen Sea region is only a fraction of the whole West Antarctic Ice Sheet, the region contains enough ice to raise global sea levels by 4 feet (1.2 meters). (NASA/GSFC/SVS)

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