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Topic: Federal Aviation Administration

NASA Flies Large Unmanned Aircraft in Public Airspace Without Chase Plane for First Time

 

NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA’s remotely-piloted Ikhana aircraft, based at the agency’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California, successfully flew its first mission in the National Airspace System without a safety chase aircraft on Tuesday. This historic flight moves the United States one step closer to normalizing unmanned aircraft operations in the airspace used by commercial and private pilots.

Flying these large remotely-piloted aircraft over the United States opens the doors to all types of services, from monitoring and fighting forest fires, to providing new emergency search and rescue operations. The technology in this aircraft could, at some point, be scaled down for use in other general aviation aircraft.

NASA’s remotely-piloted Ikhana aircraft, based at the agency’s Armstrong Flight Research Center, is flown in preparation for its first mission in public airspace without a safety chase aircraft. (NASA/Carla Thomas)

NASA’s remotely-piloted Ikhana aircraft, based at the agency’s Armstrong Flight Research Center, is flown in preparation for its first mission in public airspace without a safety chase aircraft. (NASA/Carla Thomas)

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Clarksville Regional Airport improving Runway to accommodate Larger Aircraft

 

Clarksville Regional Airport

Clarksville Regional AirportClarksville, TN – Clarksville Regional Airport’s primary runway (17/35) is closed until further notice to complete an extensive $12.9 million reconstruction project.

The project will rebuild and upgrade the primary runway and its markings, lighting and signage, as well as increase existing taxiway clearances. The upgrades will bring the airfield into full compliance with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) standards.

The $12.9 million runway reconstruction project at Clarksville Regional Airport began in early May with the complete milling and resurfacing of the airport’s primary 6,000-foot runway. These upgrades will bring the airfield into full compliance with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) standards.

The $12.9 million runway reconstruction project at Clarksville Regional Airport began in early May with the complete milling and resurfacing of the airport’s primary 6,000-foot runway. These upgrades will bring the airfield into full compliance with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) standards.

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Austin Peay State University names seasoned pilot/flight instructor Charles Weigandt director of proposed Rotor Wing Program

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Charles W. Weigandt, a 24-year U.S. Army veteran and founding member of the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment, was recently named director of Austin Peay State University’s proposed Bachelor of Science degree in Aviation Science program, with a concentration in rotor wing (helicopters). He began his new role at APSU on Tuesday, May 1st, 2018.

Charles W. Weigandt has been selected to head Austin Peay State University's Rotor Wing Program.

Charles W. Weigandt has been selected to head Austin Peay State University’s Rotor Wing Program.

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NASA has worked with John Deere for over a decade with Self-Driving Tractors

 

Written by Gina Anderson
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – There has been a lot of talk lately of self-driving cars, but farmers have already been making good use of self-driving tractors for more than a decade—in part due to a partnership between John Deere and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) on GPS receivers.

The story starts with GPS, which was still new in the mid-1990s when John Deere, based in Moline, Illinois, began using it for precision agriculture. The company combined GPS location data with readings from sensors on a harvesting combine to determine the crop yield on different parts of the field.

A long partnership with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory helped John Deere spread self-driving tractor capabilities all over the world, lowering costs and improving yields for farmers while popularizing the idea of precision agriculture. (John Deere)

A long partnership with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory helped John Deere spread self-driving tractor capabilities all over the world, lowering costs and improving yields for farmers while popularizing the idea of precision agriculture. (John Deere)

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101st Combat Aviation Brigade Soldiers preserve history by repairing Historic Glider

 

Written by Sgt. Marcus Floyd
101st Combat Aviation Brigade

Wings of DestinyFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne Division

Fort Campbell, KY – Over the past year, the Don F. Pratt Museum staff worked tirelessly to renovate the museum and prepare it for its reopening.

During the renovation, the World War II-era glider that serves as the centerpiece of the museum was damaged by a unit mascot.

Despite this minor setback, Staff Sgt. Ian Thompson, the safety officer for the 96th Aviation Support Battalion, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade, and a team of seven Soldiers repaired the glider in time for the museum’s reopening.

Soldiers with B. Company, 96th Aviation Support Battalion, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade repair a damaged World War II era-glider wing November 20, 2017 at Fort Campbell, Ky. As one of the few remaining World War II-era gliders in the world, many Soldiers from the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) used gliders. (Staff Sgt. Ian Thompson, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade)

Soldiers with B. Company, 96th Aviation Support Battalion, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade repair a damaged World War II era-glider wing November 20, 2017 at Fort Campbell, Ky. As one of the few remaining World War II-era gliders in the world, many Soldiers from the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) used gliders. (Staff Sgt. Ian Thompson, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade)

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APSU working to offer Aviation Science Degree next Fall

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – In Clarksville, it’s not unusual to see military aircraft flying over town, but next year, a new bachelor’s degree program at Austin Peay State University will put a few civilian helicopters into the local sky.

That’s because the University is in the final approval stages of a Bachelor of Science degree in Aviation Science, with a concentration in rotor wing (helicopters), beginning next fall. The program will be the first rotor-wing flight school attached to a bachelor’s degree in the state.

Austin Peay State University looks to offer a Bachelor of Science degree in Aviation Science.

Austin Peay State University looks to offer a Bachelor of Science degree in Aviation Science.

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Charles Hand Completes 10 Years of Service to Clarksville-Montgomery County Airport Authority

 

Clarksville Regional AirportClarksville, TN – Local businessman Charles Hand was recently recognized for 10 years of service to the Clarksville-Montgomery County Airport Authority.

Hand has been a member of the airport’s governing board since July 1st, 2007, serving two consecutive five-year terms, the maximum continuous allowed by the authority’s bylaws. His second term expires as of June 30th, 2017.

Charles Hand, left, was recognized for 10 years of service to the Clarksville-Montgomery County Airport Authority. (Tommy Vallejos)

Charles Hand, left, was recognized for 10 years of service to the Clarksville-Montgomery County Airport Authority. (Tommy Vallejos)

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NASA tests news Air Traffic Management Technology

 

Written by Jim Banke
NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHampton, VA – Commercial airline pilots who as children played “Follow the Leader” will have no problem with a new air traffic control innovation NASA and its partners are working on that also will make passengers happier.

It’s called Flight Deck Interval Management, or FIM, and it promises to safely increase the number of airplanes that can land on the same runway at busy airports by more precisely managing the time, or interval, between each aircraft arrival.

At NASA’s Langley Research Center, retired airline pilots test procedures that will be used during upcoming flight tests of a new aircraft spacing tool. The simulator is set up like a 757 jet, similar to one of the aircraft in the ATD-1 flight tests. (NASA Langley / David C. Bowman)

At NASA’s Langley Research Center, retired airline pilots test procedures that will be used during upcoming flight tests of a new aircraft spacing tool. The simulator is set up like a 757 jet, similar to one of the aircraft in the ATD-1 flight tests. (NASA Langley / David C. Bowman)

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NASA Researchers work on Fuel Additive that could reduce Jet Fuel Volatility

 

Written by Elizabeth Landau
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Airplane accidents are especially dangerous because jet fuel is highly flammable under crash conditions. On impact, jet fuel is dispersed in the air as a fine mist, which triggers a sequence of events that can lead to a fire engulfing an entire plane.

Researchers at the California Institute of Technology and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which is managed by Caltech, have been working on additives that inhibit the formation of this highly flammable mist during collisions. These additives are based on long molecules called polymers.

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NASA takes a look back at 2014

 

Written by David Weaver
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – In 2014, NASA took significant steps on the agency’s journey to Mars — testing cutting-edge technologies and making scientific discoveries while studying our changing Earth and the infinite universe as the agency made progress on the next generation of air travel.

“We continued to make great progress on our journey to Mars this year, awarding contracts to American companies who will return human space flight launches to U.S. soil, advancing space technology development; and successfully completing the first flight of Orion, the next deep space spacecraft in which our astronauts will travel,” said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden. “We moved forward on our work to create quieter, greener airplanes and develop technologies to make air travel more efficient; and we advanced our study of our changing home planet, Earth, while increasing our understanding of others in our solar system and beyond.”

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