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Topic: Federal Aviation Administration

NASA takes a look back at 2014

 

Written by David Weaver
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – In 2014, NASA took significant steps on the agency’s journey to Mars — testing cutting-edge technologies and making scientific discoveries while studying our changing Earth and the infinite universe as the agency made progress on the next generation of air travel.

“We continued to make great progress on our journey to Mars this year, awarding contracts to American companies who will return human space flight launches to U.S. soil, advancing space technology development; and successfully completing the first flight of Orion, the next deep space spacecraft in which our astronauts will travel,” said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden. “We moved forward on our work to create quieter, greener airplanes and develop technologies to make air travel more efficient; and we advanced our study of our changing home planet, Earth, while increasing our understanding of others in our solar system and beyond.”

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Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA looks into reducing the noise of a Sonic Boom for Supersonic Passenger Flight

 

Written by Frank Jennings, Jr.
NASA Glenn Research Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationCleveland, OH – Since the Concorde’s final landing at London’s Heathrow Airport nearly a decade ago, commercial supersonic air travel has been as elusive as a piece of lost luggage. However, this hasn’t stopped NASA from continuing the quest to develop solutions that will help get supersonic passenger travel off the ground once more.

And, while aerospace engineers have made significant progress in their understanding of supersonic flight, one significant challenge remains: the loud sonic boom.

This rendering shows The Boeing Company's future supersonic advanced concept featuring two engines above the fuselage.  (NASA/Boeing)

This rendering shows The Boeing Company’s future supersonic advanced concept featuring two engines above the fuselage. (NASA/Boeing)

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Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA’s Aeronautics Research benefits those flying this Holiday weekend

 

Written by Jim Banke
NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Traveling by air this holiday season, or any time of year? If so then you’ll be in the company of millions who are directly benefiting from the ongoing research performed by NASA’s aeronautical innovators now, and in the future.

During 2012, NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate continued a wide range of research projects aimed at advancing the science of flight.

NASA-developed technology is onboard nearly every commercial aircraft flying today or in use at every major airport. (Image credit: NASA)

NASA-developed technology is onboard nearly every commercial aircraft flying today or in use at every major airport. (Image credit: NASA)

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Sections: Technology | No Comments
 


Physics Students at Austin Peay send high altitude balloon into Stratosphere

 

Austin Peay State UniversityClarksville, TN – On a recent Tuesday afternoon, a farmer in rural Scottsville, KY, spotted a strange, shimmering object in one of his fields. He wasn’t quite sure what to make of it. It appeared to be nothing more than a Styrofoam beer cooler, wrapped in aluminum foil, with a parachute attached to it.

“What in the world is this?” he reportedly said. Another man with him said it looked like a weather balloon, so the farmer picked up the unusual box and took it back to his garage. The next morning, as he drove down a nearby highway, he happened upon a group of Austin Peay State University students wading through the weeds and tall grass along the side of the road.

APSU students prepare to release a high altitude balloon into the stratosphere. (Photo by Charles Booth)

APSU students prepare to release a high altitude balloon into the stratosphere. (Photo by Charles Booth)

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Sections: Education | No Comments
 

Small plane crashes in Sango, Tennessee

 
Robert B. Eley stands before his crashed aircraft

Robert B. Eley stands before his crashed aircraft

Clarksville, TN – Robert B. Eley of Clarksville, TN was flying his SONEX, a fixed Wing single-engine aircraft at 1,500 feet around 1:00pm this afternoon when it lost power. “I throttled down, and when I went to throttle up again, it wouldn’t go,”  he said. The loss of power meant that the plane would not be able to make the nearby airport, and Eley had to set it down as soon as possible. A typical plane at 1,500 feet with no power would glide for around 2 miles, and would stay aloft for roughly 3 minutes. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | 3 Comments
 



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