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Topic: Fruits

Latinos Live Familismo; How this can help improve the health of the Latino community

 

Written by Dr. Eduardo Sanchez

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – Familismo or familism. While many look to social psychologists to define this cultural characteristic, Latinos live it.

Our cultures of origin — Mexican, Puerto Rican, Salvadoran, Cuban, Colombian or other Spanish-speaking countries — are rooted in family, in connecting, helping each other become the best we can be, putting our children first and supporting each other through good times and bad.

Fruit preparation. (American Heart Association)

Fruit preparation. (American Heart Association)

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Clarksville Center for Audiology says Healthier Diet May Help Preserve Your Hearing

 

Clarksville Center for AudiologyClarksville, TN – It’s well known that healthy eating habits can promote better overall health within the body, as well as alleviate a number of diet-related illnesses and diseases.

According to a new examination of the eating habits of 2,366 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey participants, those who eat more fruits and vegetables might also have better hearing — even if they’re exposed to more noise.

Eatting more fruits and vegetables may help you hear better.

Eatting more fruits and vegetables may help you hear better.

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ShopSmart Uncovers True Cost of Convenience at the Supermarket

 

When it pays to buy recipe-ready fresh foods and when it doesn’t

ShopSmart MagazineYonkers, NY – Precut fresh fruits, veggies, and meats may help get dinner on the table faster, but the markups on these can be huge.

The June 2015 issue of ShopSmart, from Consumer Reports, uncovered how much more shoppers will pay for 12 ready-to-cook items versus their unprepped counterparts including onions and green beans, which pre-cut, cost 370 and 192 percent more respectively. «Read the rest of this article»

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Consumer Reports looks at the use of Pesticides on Produce to Help Consumers Reduce Exposure

 

Risk Guide for 48 Fruits and Vegetables from 14 Countries; Choosing Organic Always the Safest Choice but in Many Cases Conventional Can Be As Low Risk

Consumer ReportsYonkers, NY – Fresh produce is an important part of a healthy diet.  A new study by Consumer Reports looks at the risks of pesticide residues for 48 fruits and vegetables from around the globe to come up with guidelines to help consumers reduce their exposure to these toxic chemicals.

An accompanying 40-page report, “Pesticide Use in Produce,” from Consumer Reports’ Food Safety and Sustainability Center provides a closer look at the consequences of pesticide use for those who produce food, wildlife, and the environment. «Read the rest of this article»

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Top 10 Gifts your heart will love for American Heart Month

 

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – Want to make your heart all warm and happy? Start with this gift list.

February is American Heart Month. And it’s a good time for the American Heart Association’s list of Top 10 Gifts that you can give to your heart to make it healthy and very, very happy.

While heart disease remains the No. 1 killer of Americans and No. 1 killer in the world, it is 80% preventable through steps we can all take.

February is American Heart Month

February is American Heart Month

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New American Heart Association Guidelines recommends Diets high in Fruit, Vegetables, Whole Grains and Nuts among factors to lower first-time Stroke Risk

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX –  Eating Mediterranean or DASH-style diets, regularly engaging in physical activity and keeping your blood pressure under control can lower your risk of a first-time stroke, according to updated AHA/ASA guideline published in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

“We have a huge opportunity to improve how we prevent new strokes, because risk factors that can be changed or controlled — especially high blood pressure — account for 90 percent of strokes,” said James Meschia, M.D., lead author of the study and professor and chairman of neurology at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida.

Fruit Stand. (American Heart Association)

Fruit Stand. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Potassium-Rich Foods cut Stroke, Death Risks among Older Women

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Postmenopausal women who eat foods higher in potassium are less likely to have strokes and die than women who eat less potassium-rich foods, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

“Previous studies have shown that potassium consumption may lower blood pressure. But whether potassium intake could prevent stroke or death wasn’t clear,” said Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, Ph.D., study senior author and distinguished university professor emerita, department of epidemiology and population health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.

Blood pressure monitoring workplace

Blood pressure monitoring workplace

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Blanchfield Army Community Hospital (BACH) brings the healing power of planting to Fort Campbell

 

Written by Sgt. Eric Lieber
Fort Campbell Warrior Transition Battalion

Blanchfield Army Hospital - BACH - Fort Campbell KYFort Campbell, KY – “This is the first of its kind in Army Medicine” proclaimed Blanchfield Army Community Hospital chief of nutrition care Lt. Col. James Pulliam as more than 20 volunteers used pickaxes, post hole diggers and shovels to break ground May 23rd for a therapeutic garden at the Fort Campbell hospital.

After years of planning, Pulliam, BACH staff and horticultural expert Dana Chango, set their plans in motion to create the first therapeutic horticultural program and garden at an Army medical facility.

A team of volunteers create the Army's first healing garden located within a medical facility's footprint at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital May 23rd, 2014. More than 20 BACH staff members and local community members came together to build the garden, which will be used as therapy for wounded, injured and ill Soldiers while providing organic fruit and vegetables for the hospital's dining facility. (U.S. Army photo by Stacy Rzepka/RELEASED)

A team of volunteers create the Army’s first healing garden located within a medical facility’s footprint at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital May 23rd, 2014. More than 20 BACH staff members and local community members came together to build the garden, which will be used as therapy for wounded, injured and ill Soldiers while providing organic fruit and vegetables for the hospital’s dining facility. (U.S. Army photo by Stacy Rzepka/RELEASED)

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U.S. Food and Drug Administration gives 7 Tips for Cleaning Fruits, Vegetables

 

U.S. Food and Drug Administration - FDASilver Spring, MD – Federal health officials estimate that nearly 48 million people are sickened by food contaminated with harmful germs each year, and some of the causes might surprise you.

Although most people know animal products must be handled carefully to prevent illness, many don’t realize that produce can also be the culprit in outbreaks of foodborne illness.

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American Heart Association says eating more fruits, vegetables may cut stroke risk worldwide

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Eating more fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of stroke worldwide, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

Researchers conducted a meta-analysis of 20 studies published over the last 19 years to assess the effects of fruit and vegetable consumption on risk of stroke globally. The combined studies involved 760,629 men and women who had 16,981 strokes.

Eating more fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of stroke worldwide, according to a new analysis of 20 studies conducted in Europe, the United States and Asia. (Photo by American Heart Association)

Eating more fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of stroke worldwide, according to a new analysis of 20 studies conducted in Europe, the United States and Asia. (Photo by American Heart Association)

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