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Topic: Heart Attack

American Heart Association says Mediterranean diet with virgin olive oil may boost ‘good’ cholesterol

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A Mediterranean diet rich in virgin olive oil may enhance the cardioprotective benefits of high-density lipoproteins (HDL—the “good” cholesterol) compared to other diets, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

High levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDL—the “bad cholesterol”) and triglycerides, a type of blood fat, are associated with an increased risk of heart and blood vessel diseases. HDL cholesterol is associated with a lower risk because these lipoproteins help eliminate the excess cholesterol from the bloodstream.

Assorted foods for the Mediterranean Diet - whole grains, olives, olive oil, vegetables, nuts. (American Heart Association)

Assorted foods for the Mediterranean Diet – whole grains, olives, olive oil, vegetables, nuts. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Regular exercise may reduce High Blood Pressure risk in African Americans

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Regular swimming, biking or even brisk walks can help African Americans lower their chance of developing high blood pressure, according to new research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

“High blood pressure is a major health issue for many African Americans,” said Keith Diaz, Ph.D., lead study author and assistant professor at the Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health at Colombia University Medical Center in New York, New York.

Man checking blood pressure at office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

Man checking blood pressure at office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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Meal planning, timing, may impact heart health according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Planning when to eat meals and snacks and not skipping breakfast, are patterns associated with healthier diets, which could reduce cardiovascular disease risk, according to a new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

The statement provides a snapshot of the current scientific evidence suggesting when and how often people eat may impact risk factors for heart attack, stroke, or other cardiac or blood vessel diseases.

Planning and timing meals and snacks, such as not skipping breakfast and allocating more calories earlier in the day, might help reduce cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

Planning and timing meals and snacks, such as not skipping breakfast and allocating more calories earlier in the day, might help reduce cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

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Blacks, Hispanics less likely to achieve Blood Pressure Control according to American Heart Association

 

Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Blacks and Hispanics with high blood pressure are less likely than whites to get their condition under control, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

“High blood pressure is very common, and it is strongly linked to cardiovascular diseases like stroke, heart attack and heart failure,” said Edgar Argulian, M.D., M.P.H., senior study author and assistant professor of medicine and a cardiologist at Mt. Sinai St Luke’s Hospital in New York.

Lack of healthcare insurance and younger age increases the treatment and control gap between these minority groups and whites. (American Heart Association)

Lack of healthcare insurance and younger age increases the treatment and control gap between these minority groups and whites. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Heart Disease and Stroke continue to take a toll on lives

 

Statement from Nancy Brown, American Heart Association CEO

Predicted trend in increased Holiday Deaths Occurs

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Reports of sudden, unexpected deaths linked to heart disease and stroke command our daily news headlines, but seemingly even more so in these past few weeks. The untimely loss of so many deeply saddens us.

And it’s troubling to know that even though we have made massive strides in research toward treatment and cure, needless suffering and death from heart disease and stroke persist.

Cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading global cause of death. More than 17.3 million people die from heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases around the world each year.

CARDIAC ARREST occurs when the heart malfunctions and stops beating unexpectedly. Cardiac arrest is an "ELECTRICAL" problem. A HEART ATTACK occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked. A heart attack is a “CIRCULATION” problem. A blocked artery prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished by that artery begins to die. (American Heart Association)

CARDIAC ARREST occurs when the heart malfunctions and stops beating unexpectedly. Cardiac arrest is an “ELECTRICAL” problem. A HEART ATTACK occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked. A heart attack is a “CIRCULATION” problem. A blocked artery prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished by that artery begins to die. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says High Pain Tolerance may mask Heart Attack Symptoms

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Heart attacks may go unrecognized among individuals with high pain tolerance, putting them at an increased risk for poor recoveries, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

A heart attack does not always have obvious symptoms, such as pain in your chest, shortness of breath and cold sweats.

This is the cold pressor test that measured pain tolerance as participants placed their hand in ice-cold water at 3 degrees Celsius (about 37 degrees Fahrenheit) for as long as possible, up to two minutes. From Researcher Andrea Ohrn, M.D., study lead author and Ph.D. Fellow at University of Tromsø in Norway. (Stina Grønbech)

This is the cold pressor test that measured pain tolerance as participants placed their hand in ice-cold water at 3 degrees Celsius (about 37 degrees Fahrenheit) for as long as possible, up to two minutes. From Researcher Andrea Ohrn, M.D., study lead author and Ph.D. Fellow at University of Tromsø in Norway. (Stina Grønbech)

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American Heart Association says Avoid the Deadly Holiday Heart Attack

 

Heart attack deaths are highest during December/January holiday season

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to a study published in Circulation, a journal of the American Heart Association (AHA), the winter holiday season is considered a risk factor for cardiac and noncardiac death.

While researchers don’t know exactly why heart attacks are more common around holidays, they note a number of possible reasons, including changes in diet and alcohol consumption during the holidays; stress from family interactions, strained finances, travel and entertaining; respiratory problems from burning wood; and not paying attention to the signs and symptoms of a heart attack.

Holiday Heart Attack 5 Tips Infographic. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Agencies Provide Guidance as Devastating Wildfires Impact East Tennessee

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – The Tennessee Department of Health, the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation are urging residents of East Tennessee areas affected by devastating wildfires to protect themselves and their families from smoke.

While inhaling smoke may adversely affect anyone, those at greatest risk include the elderly, young children, pregnant women and those with existing respiratory conditions, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, COPD, or those with heart disease.

Smoke from devastating wildfires in East Tennessee areas can be damaging to your health.

Smoke from devastating wildfires in East Tennessee areas can be damaging to your health.

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American Heart Association says Popular Heartburn Medication may increase Ischemic Stroke Risk

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – A popular group of antacids known as proton pump inhibitors, or PPIs, used to reduce stomach acid and treat heartburn may increase the risk of ischemic stroke, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

“PPIs have been associated with unhealthy vascular function, including heart attacks, kidney disease and dementia,” said Thomas Sehested, M.D., study lead author and a researcher at the Danish Heart Foundation in Copenhagen, Denmark. “We wanted to see if PPIs also posed a risk for ischemic stroke, especially given their increasing use in the general population.”

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

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Amputation risks highest amongst Poor and Black Peripheral Artery Disease Patients according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Poverty and black race are independently predictive of greater amputation risk among patients with narrowing of the blood vessels, or peripheral artery disease (PAD), according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

PAD is a serious disease that occurs when fat, cholesterol, and other substances accumulate in blood vessels away from the heart, restricting blood flow.

Poverty and black race are independently predictive of greater amputation risk among patients with narrowing of the blood vessels, or peripheral artery disease (PAD). (American Heart Association)

Poverty and black race are independently predictive of greater amputation risk among patients with narrowing of the blood vessels, or peripheral artery disease (PAD). (American Heart Association)

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