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Topic: Heart Attack

Tennessee Agencies Provide Guidance as Devastating Wildfires Impact East Tennessee

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – The Tennessee Department of Health, the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation are urging residents of East Tennessee areas affected by devastating wildfires to protect themselves and their families from smoke.

While inhaling smoke may adversely affect anyone, those at greatest risk include the elderly, young children, pregnant women and those with existing respiratory conditions, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, COPD, or those with heart disease.

Smoke from devastating wildfires in East Tennessee areas can be damaging to your health.

Smoke from devastating wildfires in East Tennessee areas can be damaging to your health.

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American Heart Association says Popular Heartburn Medication may increase Ischemic Stroke Risk

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – A popular group of antacids known as proton pump inhibitors, or PPIs, used to reduce stomach acid and treat heartburn may increase the risk of ischemic stroke, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

“PPIs have been associated with unhealthy vascular function, including heart attacks, kidney disease and dementia,” said Thomas Sehested, M.D., study lead author and a researcher at the Danish Heart Foundation in Copenhagen, Denmark. “We wanted to see if PPIs also posed a risk for ischemic stroke, especially given their increasing use in the general population.”

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

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Amputation risks highest amongst Poor and Black Peripheral Artery Disease Patients according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Poverty and black race are independently predictive of greater amputation risk among patients with narrowing of the blood vessels, or peripheral artery disease (PAD), according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

PAD is a serious disease that occurs when fat, cholesterol, and other substances accumulate in blood vessels away from the heart, restricting blood flow.

Poverty and black race are independently predictive of greater amputation risk among patients with narrowing of the blood vessels, or peripheral artery disease (PAD). (American Heart Association)

Poverty and black race are independently predictive of greater amputation risk among patients with narrowing of the blood vessels, or peripheral artery disease (PAD). (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Inherited Taste Perceptions may explain why some people eat too much Salt

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Inherited differences in taste perceptions may help explain why some people eat more salt than recommended, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

“Genetic factors that influence taste aren’t necessarily obvious to people, but they can impact heart health by influencing the foods they select,” said lead author Jennifer Smith, B.S.N., R.N., a Ph.D. student at the University of Kentucky College of Nursing.

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says New Peripheral Artery Disease Guidelines emphasize Medical Therapy and Structured Exercise

 

American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Clinical Practice Guideline

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – New guidelines for the treatment of peripheral artery disease (PAD), include recommendations on the use of antiplatelet therapy to reduce the risk of blood clots and statin drugs to lower cholesterol and advise PAD patients to participate in a structured exercise program.

The joint American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines are published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Eliminating exposure to all tobacco – including second-hand smoke – is highly recommended for patients with PAD. (American Heart Association)

Eliminating exposure to all tobacco – including second-hand smoke – is highly recommended for patients with PAD. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports New Risk Assessment Tool May Better Predict Dynamic Risk of Heart Disease

 

The new tool is an extension of the ACC/AHA ASCVD Risk Estimator

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – A new assessment tool—the Million Hearts® Model Longitudinal ASCVD Risk Assessment tool—funded by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in partnership with the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association— is designed to help predict the 10-year risk of developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASVCD) and how that risk may change over time as preventive treatments are initiated.

The tool is an extension of the ASCVD Pooled Cohort Equation first published in the 2013 ACC/AHA Guideline on the Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Recreational, Commuter Biking linked to Lower Cardiovascular Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People who bike regularly, either for pleasure or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, according to two separate studies published simultaneously in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation and Journal of the American Heart Association, the AHA/ASA’s Open Access Journal.

While structured cycling as part of a formal workout routine is already known to guard against cardiovascular illness, little is known about the effects of habitual biking done for leisure or as a way to commute.

People who bike regularly, either recreationally or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular illness, according to studies conducted in Denmark and Sweden.

People who bike regularly, either recreationally or as a way to commute, appear to have a lower risk of cardiovascular illness, according to studies conducted in Denmark and Sweden.

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Air Pollution linked to Blood Vessel damage in Healthy Young Adults according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Fine particulate matter air pollution may be associated with blood vessel damage and inflammation among young, healthy adults, according to new research in Circulation Research, an American Heart Association journal.

“These results substantially expand our understanding about how air pollution contributes to cardiovascular disease by showing that exposure is associated with a cascade of adverse effects,” said C. Arden Pope, Ph.D., study lead author and Mary Lou Fulton Professor of Economics at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.

Traffic on the highway. (American Heart Association)

Traffic on the highway. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says High Blood Pressure and Brain Health are Linked

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXHigh blood pressure, especially in middle age, is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment later in life, according to a new statement from the American Heart Association.

The statement, which was published in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension, reviewed multiple studies and provides an overview of what is currently known about how high blood pressure influences brain diseases such as stroke, vascular cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease.

Doctor reviewing brain image up close. (American Heart Association)

Doctor reviewing brain image up close. (American Heart Association)

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Emotional Upset and Heavy Exertion may trigger a Heart Attack according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Being angry, emotionally upset or engaging in heavy physical exertion may trigger a heart attack, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

In a large international study, researchers found an association (more than twice the risk) between anger or emotional upset and the onset of heart attack symptoms within one hour. The same was true for heavy physical exertion during the hour before their first heart attack.

Being angry or emotionally upset while engaging in heavy physical exertion appears to triple heart attack risk. (American Heart Association)

Being angry or emotionally upset while engaging in heavy physical exertion appears to triple heart attack risk. (American Heart Association)

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