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Topic: Heart Attack

American Heart Association says Statin use differs among Hispanic Adults at risk for Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In the United States, adults of different Hispanic/Latino backgrounds, at high risk for heart disease, varied significantly in their use of widely-prescribed cholesterol-lowering medications known as statins, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association. The difference was based on whether or not they had health insurance.

“These findings have important implications for preventing disparities in cardiovascular outcomes within the growing U.S. Hispanic/Latino population,” said study lead author Dima M. Qato, Pharm.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmacy systems, outcomes and policy at the University of Illinois in Chicago.

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Women with Endometriosis at higher risk for Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women with endometriosis – especially those 40 or younger – may have a higher risk of heart disease, according to new research published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

The study may be the first prospective investigation to examine the link between coronary heart disease and endometriosis – the growth of the tissue that lines the uterus (the endometrium) – outside the uterus. Researchers reviewed the records of 116,430 women enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study II. Endometriosis was diagnosed using surgical examinations in 11,903 women by end of follow-up.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Wearable defibrillator may be an alternative to ICD for some patients; more research needed

 

This is the American Heart Association’s first science advisory on the wearable automatic defibrillator.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A wearable automatic defibrillator may be an option for patients who are at risk for life-threatening heart rhythm abnormalities but are not good candidates for an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD), according to an advisory from the American Heart Association, published in its Circulation journal.

The light-weight device is worn under street clothes, and, like an ICD, it is designed to provide around-the-clock monitoring of erratic heart rhythms that could result in sudden cardiac death, and when appropriate, provide an electric shock to return the heart to a normal rhythm.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder may affect Blood Vessel Health in Veterans

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may decrease the ability of blood vessels to dilate, raising the risk of heart attack and stroke in veterans, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

In the largest study to date on the impact of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on blood vessel health, researchers found that blood vessels of veterans with PTSD were unable to expand normally in response to stimulus – they were less reactive — compared to veterans without PTSD. Less reactive blood vessels are linked to heart disease and other serious conditions.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Stress management may enhance Cardiac Rehab, Improve Recovery

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Heart patients may benefit from cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) programs even more when stress management is added, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Cardiac rehabilitation programs do not routinely offer stress management, but this may change should demand increase. And because patients may be reluctant to ask for the programs themselves, the onus is on the physicians to recognize that stress management is important for the optimal medical management of patients,” said James A. Blumenthal, Ph.D., professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina.

Adding stress management into cardiac rehabilitation programs should be encouraged, researchers say. (American Heart Association)

Adding stress management into cardiac rehabilitation programs should be encouraged, researchers say. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Genetically inherited High Cholesterol twice as common as believed

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Genetically inherited high levels of cholesterol are twice as common in the United States as previously believed, affecting 1 in 250 adults, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

The condition, familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), leads to severely elevated cholesterol levels from birth and is a leading cause of early heart attack.

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Moderate Drinking has risks and benefits, however, heavy drinking heightens Short and Long term risk of Heart Attack, Stroke

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPhoenix, AZ – Drinking alcohol is associated with an immediate higher risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke. The risk lessens and can become protective after 24 hours for moderate drinking but remains high for heavy drinking, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific Sessions.

The study, a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of previous research, will also be published simultaneously in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

There may be an immediate risk of having a stroke or heart attack after drinking any alcohol, but moderate intake produces some protective health benefits within 24 hours. However, heavy drinking may increase both short- and long-term heart and stroke risks. (American Heart Association)

There may be an immediate risk of having a stroke or heart attack after drinking any alcohol, but moderate intake produces some protective health benefits within 24 hours. However, heavy drinking may increase both short- and long-term heart and stroke risks. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says a ten percent price change could prevent Heart Disease and Death

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPhoenix, AZ – A ten percent drop in price for healthy foods and a ten percent increase in the price of unhealthy foods could potentially prevent a significant number of people from dying from heart disease and stroke, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific 2016 meeting.

Decreasing the price of fruits, vegetables and grains by ten percent, while increasing the price of sugary drinks by ten percent, could prevent 515,000 deaths from cardiovascular disease over 20 years. (American Heart Association)

Decreasing the price of fruits, vegetables and grains by ten percent, while increasing the price of sugary drinks by ten percent, could prevent 515,000 deaths from cardiovascular disease over 20 years. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health says Healthy Hearts Need Activity in Winter Months

 

TDH Offers Suggestions to Improve Heart Health

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Heart disease is the number one killer of adults in Tennessee and among its primary causes are poor diets and a lack of adequate physical activity.

The Tennessee Department of Health reminds individuals the winter months demand increased attention for heart health because short days and cold weather prompt many of us to crave comfy couches and calorie-rich, feel-good foods.

Walking outdoors.

Walking outdoors.

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American Stroke Association reports Pregnancy in older age increases Stroke, Heart Attack risk years later

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationLos Angeles, CA – Women who become pregnant at age 40 or older face a greater risk of stroke and heart attack later in life than women who become pregnant at a younger age, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2016.

“We already knew that older women were more likely than younger women to experience health problems during their pregnancy,” said Adnan I. Qureshi, M.D., lead researcher and director of the Zeenat Qureshi Stroke Institute in St. Cloud, Minnesota. “Now, we know that the consequences of that later pregnancy stretch years into the future.”

Women pregnant at age 40 or older face a greater risk of stroke and heart attack later in life than those pregnant at a younger age. (American Heart Association)

Women pregnant at age 40 or older face a greater risk of stroke and heart attack later in life than those pregnant at a younger age. (American Heart Association)

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