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Topic: Heart Attack

American Heart Association says ‘Perfect storm’ of Stress, Depression may raise risk of Death, Heart Attack for Heart Patients

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The combination of stress and heavy depression can significantly increase heart patient’s risk of death or heart attack, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

The study examined the effect of high stress levels and high depressive symptoms among nearly 5,000 heart patients.

Researchers say behavioral interventions may be needed to help heart patients manage both stress and depression. (American Heart Association)

Researchers say behavioral interventions may be needed to help heart patients manage both stress and depression. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says poor response to Cholesterol Drugs may indicate blocked Arteries

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – If your “bad” cholesterol level stays the same or increases after you take statin drugs, you may have more blocked arteries than people whose levels drop, according to research in the American Heart Association journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology.

Low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is considered the “bad” cholesterol because it contributes to plaque buildup, thick, hard deposit that can clog arteries and make them less flexible. «Read the rest of this article»

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Tennessee Department of Health encourages everyone to prevent Heart Attacks

 

Tennessee Department of Health - TDOHNashville, TN – The Tennessee Department of Health reminds everyone to make heart health a top priority during American Heart Month and throughout the year. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and the number one killer of women.

“Heart disease is something everyone should take very seriously, and there are many things we can do to reduce our risk,” said Carolyn Wester, MD, MPH, Deputy Medical Director for the TDH Division of Family Health and Wellness. “If you have symptoms of a heart attack, seek help immediately. Every second counts.”

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American Heart Association reports Older Adults with limited mobility may lessen Heart Problems with Activity

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Older adults with limited mobility may lower their risk of heart attack and coronary death for every minute of physical activity, according to research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Reducing time spent being sedentary even by engaging in low-intensity activities could have important cardiovascular benefits for older adults with mobility limitations,” said Thomas W. Buford, Ph.D., senior author of the study and director of the Health Promotion Center of the University of Florida Institute on Aging in Gainesville, Florida.

Regular daily walking reduced the risk of stroke, regardless of the pace or distance. (American Heart Association)

Regular daily walking reduced the risk of stroke, regardless of the pace or distance. (American Heart Association)

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New American Heart Association Guidelines recommends Diets high in Fruit, Vegetables, Whole Grains and Nuts among factors to lower first-time Stroke Risk

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX –  Eating Mediterranean or DASH-style diets, regularly engaging in physical activity and keeping your blood pressure under control can lower your risk of a first-time stroke, according to updated AHA/ASA guideline published in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

“We have a huge opportunity to improve how we prevent new strokes, because risk factors that can be changed or controlled — especially high blood pressure — account for 90 percent of strokes,” said James Meschia, M.D., lead author of the study and professor and chairman of neurology at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida.

Fruit Stand. (American Heart Association)

Fruit Stand. (American Heart Association)

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New American Heart Association Support Network helps in Heart Disease, Stroke emotional recovery

 

Nashville assisting in development of new national “connect with others” site for heart and stroke patients, families, friends, caregivers

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – When Nashville mom Catherine Clinkscales’s son, Cain, was born with severe heart defects, the first place she turned to was the American Heart Association. Four years later, she’s helping the national American Heart Association reach out to other parents who may be facing similar challenges.

“At the time, I had no idea where to turn and I was looking to get connected with another family that was in our situation,” she said.

Catherine Clinkscales and her son Cain.

Catherine Clinkscales and her son Cain.

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American Heart Association says Low Social Support linked to Poor Health in Young Heart Attack Survivors

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Having few friends, family and a general lack of social support is associated with poor health and quality of life and depression in young men and women a year after having a heart attack, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Social support is the perception of having friends or family who serve as confidants and companions, offer advice and information, show emotional concern, or provide financial or material support, said Emily Bucholz, lead researcher and a student in the School of Medicine and the Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology in the Yale School of Public Health in New Haven, Connecticut. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says an hour of Moderate Exercise a day may decrease Heart Failure Risk

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Exercising each day can help keep the doctor away.

In a new study reported in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Heart Failure, researchers say more than an hour of moderate or half an hour of vigorous exercise per day may lower your risk of heart failure by 46 percent.

The more active you are, the greater your protection from heart failure. (American Heart Association)

The more active you are, the greater your protection from heart failure. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Hospitalizations, Deaths from Heart Disease, Stroke drop in last decade

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – U.S. hospitalizations and deaths from heart disease and stroke dropped significantly in the last decade, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

“Interestingly, these improvements happened in a period when there were no real ‘miracle’ clinical advancements,” said Harlan Krumholz, M.D., S.M., lead author of the “most comprehensive report card to-date” on America’s progress in heart disease and stroke prevention and treatment. “Rather, we saw consistent improvements in the use of evidence-based treatments and medications and an increase in quality improvement initiatives using registries and other data to track performance and support improvement efforts — as well as a strong emphasis on heart-healthy lifestyles and behaviors.”

Blood flow blocked in brain. (American Heart Association)

Blood flow blocked in brain. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association funding new research network aimed at preventing heart disease, stroke

 

Vanderbilt one of four major institutions in network

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Four major institutions are banding together in a new research network aimed at preventing heart disease and stroke, the two leading causes of death in the world.

The Strategically Focused Prevention Research Network Centers — funded by a $15 million grant from the American Heart Association — is designed to help people live longer, healthier lives. «Read the rest of this article»

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