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Topic: Heart Attack

American Heart Association says Blacks suffer higher rates of fatal first-time Heart Attacks than Whites

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Black men may have similar risk of coronary heart disease as white men, but their first cardiac event is twice as likely to be fatal. That means preventing a first heart attack is even more crucial for blacks, according to research findings reported in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

In an analysis that examined cardiac events in three major heart studies, researchers found that in two of these studies, black adults aged 45-64 have about twice the risk of fatal events compared with whites.

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American Heart Association reports African Americans with Healthier Lifestyles had lower risk of High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Among African Americans, small health improvements were associated with lower risk of developing high blood pressure, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

African Americans who had at least two modifiable healthy behaviors at the beginning of the study, compared to those with one or none, researchers found the risk of high blood pressure at follow-up was reduced by 20 percent.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Breastfeeding may reduce a Mother’s Heart Attack and Stroke Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Breastfeeding is not only healthy for babies, it may also reduce a mother’s risk of having a heart attack or stroke later in life, according to new research published in of the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Previous studies have suggested that mothers get short-term health benefits from breastfeeding, such as weight loss and lower cholesterol, blood pressure and glucose levels after pregnancy.

A study of Chinese women found that the longer a mother breastfeeds, the greater the cardiovascular health benefit appears to be. (American Heart Association)

A study of Chinese women found that the longer a mother breastfeeds, the greater the cardiovascular health benefit appears to be. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Kicking the Salt Shaker habit may not be enough

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Restaurant foods and commercially processed foods sold in stores accounted for about 70 percent of dietary sodium intake in a study in three U.S. regions, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Sodium is an important contributor to high blood pressure, one of the leading causes of heart attack and stroke. The American Heart Association recommends a maximum of 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day, which is equivalent to 1 teaspoon of salt.

Salt added at home during food preparation or at the table accounted for a small fraction of dietary sodium. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Salt added at home during food preparation or at the table accounted for a small fraction of dietary sodium. (Copyright American Heart Association)

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Nearly 1 in 5 with highest cardiac risk don’t think they need to improve health according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Nearly one in five people who reported the greatest number of cardiac risk factors did not believe they needed to improve their health, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

While most people in the study at the highest risk for a heart attack were more likely to agree on needed health improvements, more than half of those perceiving this need identified barriers to change, which were most commonly lack of self-discipline, work schedule and family responsibilities.

A Canadian study found that nearly one in five of those at highest risk for a heart attack did not believe they needed to improve their health. (American Heart Association)

A Canadian study found that nearly one in five of those at highest risk for a heart attack did not believe they needed to improve their health. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association wants you to check your Blood Pressure

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – As part of #CheckIt, the American Heart Association (AHA) ) – the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease –  wants people to check their own blood pressure by May 17th, World Hypertension Day, which is part of National High Blood Pressure Education Month.

Through World Hypertension Day, the American Heart Association is joining other organizations in striving to reach 25 million blood pressure checks globally (5 million in the U.S.). Also, participants are encouraged to log their action and learn about high blood pressure.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Extreme Heat Exposure linked to Firefighter Heart Attacks

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Exposure to extreme heat and physical exertion during firefighting may trigger the formation of blood clots and impair blood vessel function, changes associated with increased risk of heart attack, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Cardiovascular events are the leading cause of death among firefighters and are responsible for roughly 45 percent of on-duty firefighter fatalities annually in the United States.

Exposure to extreme heat and physical exertion during firefighting may trigger the formation of blood clots and impair blood vessel function, changes associated with increased risk of heart attack. (American Heart Association)

Exposure to extreme heat and physical exertion during firefighting may trigger the formation of blood clots and impair blood vessel function, changes associated with increased risk of heart attack. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Fish Oil Supplements may help prevent death after a Heart Attack but lack evidence of cardiovascular benefit for the general population

 

American Heart Association Science Advisory

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Omega-3 fish oil supplements prescribed by a healthcare provider may help prevent death from heart disease in patients who recently had a heart attack and may prevent death and hospitalizations in patients with heart failure, but there is a lack of scientific research to support clinical use of these supplements to prevent heart disease in the general population, according to a new science advisory from the American Heart Association.

“We cannot make a recommendation to use omega-3 fish oil supplements for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease at this time,” said David Siscovick, M.D., M.P.H., chair of the writing committee of the new science advisory published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Omega-3 fish oil supplements prescribed by a healthcare provider may be reasonable for patients who have had a heart attack. (American Heart Association)

Omega-3 fish oil supplements prescribed by a healthcare provider may be reasonable for patients who have had a heart attack. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Women with Mild Heart Blockage report Poorer Health, more Anxiety and Negativity than Men

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women with mild blockage of coronary arteries report poorer health, more anxiety and a more negative outlook than men with the same condition, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

In general, people with non-obstructive coronary artery disease report more anxiety, depression and a negative outlook, what physicians refer to as psychosocial distress, than the general population. Prior to this study, gender disparity had not been investigated.

F.A.S.T. infographic with stroke warning signs: Face drooping, Arm weakness, Speech difficulty, Time to call 9-1-1. Strokeassociation.org (American Heart Association)

F.A.S.T. infographic with stroke warning signs: Face drooping, Arm weakness, Speech difficulty, Time to call 9-1-1. Strokeassociation.org (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Mediterranean diet with virgin olive oil may boost ‘good’ cholesterol

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A Mediterranean diet rich in virgin olive oil may enhance the cardioprotective benefits of high-density lipoproteins (HDL—the “good” cholesterol) compared to other diets, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

High levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDL—the “bad cholesterol”) and triglycerides, a type of blood fat, are associated with an increased risk of heart and blood vessel diseases. HDL cholesterol is associated with a lower risk because these lipoproteins help eliminate the excess cholesterol from the bloodstream.

Assorted foods for the Mediterranean Diet - whole grains, olives, olive oil, vegetables, nuts. (American Heart Association)

Assorted foods for the Mediterranean Diet – whole grains, olives, olive oil, vegetables, nuts. (American Heart Association)

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