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Topic: Heart Attack

American Stroke Association reports Blood Clot risk remains higher than normal for at least 12 weeks after Women deliver Babies

 

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationSan Diego, CAWomen’s blood clot risk remains elevated for at least 12 weeks after delivering a baby — twice as long as previously recognized, according to a large study presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2014.

The chance of a blood clot rises during pregnancy, when platelets and other blood-clotting factors increase. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reminds Middle Tennessee to get your Flu Shot Now

 

It’s even more important to get your flu shot if you have a Heart Condition

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – You know that miserable, no-good feeling that starts as a simple headache and escalates to a high fever, chills and an overall sense of yuck?

Each year in the United States an estimated 5-20 percent of the population can be infected with the flu, and more than 200,000 people may be hospitalized during the flu season. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reports Smokers who quit cut heart disease risk faster than previous estimates

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Cigarette smokers who are over 65 years of age may be able to lower their risk of cardiovascular disease-related deaths to the level of never-smokers when they quit faster than previously reported, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013.

A study showed that older people who smoked less than 32 “pack years” – 3.2 packs (20 cigarettes per pack) a day for no more than 10 years or less than one pack a day for 30 years  — and  gave up smoking 15 or fewer years ago lowered their risks of developing heart failure or dying from  heart failure, heart attacks and strokes to the same level as those who had never smoked.

Certain smokers who quit can reduce their risk of heart disease to the level of never-smokers sooner than previously thought.

Certain smokers who quit can reduce their risk of heart disease to the level of never-smokers sooner than previously thought.

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FDA Targets Trans Fat in Processed Foods

 

U.S. Food and Drug Administration - FDA

Silver Spring, MD – More than decade ago, a sea change began in the American diet, with consumers starting to avoid foods with trans fat and companies responding by reducing the amount of trans fat in their products.

This evolution began when FDA first proposed in 1999 that manufacturers be required to declare the amount of trans fat on Nutrition Facts labels because of public health concerns. That requirement became effective in 2006.

FDA Targets Trans Fat in Processed Foods

FDA Targets Trans Fat in Processed Foods

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Clarksville’s Gateway Medical Center ranks average in Consumer Reports new ratings for U.S. Hospitals for Scheduled Surgeries

 

Ratings Analyze Length of Hospital Stays and Mortality Rates; Includes Ratings for Five Common Surgery Types

Consumer ReportsYonkers, NY – For the first time, Consumer Reports has rated U.S. hospitals on how patients fare during and after surgery.

In Tennessee, 38 Hospitals were evaluated. Only the Center for Spinal Surgery and Saint Thomas Hospital, both in Nashville, TN, got a top rating. Seven Tennessee Hospitals were ranked at the bottom which included The University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville TN, and Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis, TN, to name a couple. Thirty Tennessee Hospitals were ranked average including Gateway Medical Center in Clarksville, TN. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Women want Doctors’ help in facing fears about Sex after Heart Attack

 

Despite fears of another heart attack or dying, many started having sex within a month after their heart attack.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women think it would be easier to overcome their fears of sex after having a heart attack if their doctors gave them more information, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Most women don’t have discussions with their doctors about resuming sex after a heart attack even though many experience fear or other sexual problems,” said Emily M. Abramsohn, M.P.H., the study’s lead author and a researcher at the University of Chicago. “We wanted to get a better understanding of women’s sexual recovery and how it could be improved.” «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says skipping Breakfast may increase Coronary Heart Disease Risk

 

The timing of meals, whether it’s missing a meal in the morning or eating a meal very late at night, may cause adverse metabolic effects that lead to coronary heart disease.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Here’s more evidence why breakfast may be the most important meal of the day: Men who reported that they regularly skipped breakfast had a higher risk of a heart attack or fatal coronary heart disease in a study reported in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Researchers analyzed food frequency questionnaire data and tracked health outcomes for 16 years (1992-2008) on 26,902 male health professionals ages 45-82. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says DNA particles in the Blood may help speed detection of Coronary Artery Disease

 

High blood levels of these DNA particles may eventually help identify patients at risk for further serious heart problems.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – DNA fragments in your blood may someday help doctors quickly learn if chest pain means you have narrowed heart arteries, according to a new study published in the American Heart Association journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

The study involved 282 patients, ages 34 to 83, who reported chest pain and were suspected of having coronary artery disease. Researchers used computed tomography imaging to look for hardened, or calcified, buildup in the blood vessels that supply the heart. Blood samples also were tested for bits of genetic material. Release of small DNA particles in the blood occurs during chronic inflammatory conditions such as coronary artery disease. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Institute of Medicine (IOM) report an incomplete review of Sodium’s Impact

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The American Heart Association says a new report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) — Sodium Intake in Populations: Assessment of Evidence — is incomplete in its assessment of sodium’s impact on health because it does not focus its examinations on scientific evidence that links excess consumption and high blood pressure.

The report found that though reducing sodium intakes from current levels is important, and that there is a positive relationship between higher levels of sodium intake and risk of heart disease, there is not enough evidence to conclude that sodium reduction below 2,300 mg daily leads to less heart disease, stroke and a reduced risk of death.

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says increases in Heart Disease risk factors may decrease Brain Function

 

Smoking and diabetes were especially linked with reduced brain function.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Brain function in adults as young as 35 may decline as their heart disease risk factors increase, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Stroke.

“Young adults may think the consequences of smoking or being overweight are years down the road, but they aren’t,”  said Hanneke Joosten, M.D., lead author and nephrology fellow at the University Medical Center in Groningen, The Netherlands. «Read the rest of this article»

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