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Topic: Heart Attack

American Heart Association says a Woman’s Heart Attack Causes, Symptoms may differ from a Man’s

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A woman’s heart attack may have different underlying causes, symptoms and outcomes compared to men, and differences in risk factors and outcomes are further pronounced in black and Hispanic women, according to a scientific statement published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

The statement is the first scientific statement from the American Heart Association on heart attacks in women.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association gives Seven Healthy Heart measures may reduce Heart Failure Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People scoring well on the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 checklist for a healthy heart are less likely to develop heart failure, a condition that reduces blood and oxygen flow to the body, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Heart Failure.

Life’s Simple 7 encompasses seven measures that people can use to rate their heart health and take steps to improve it. The measures are: manage blood pressure, control cholesterol, reduce blood sugar, get physically active, eat better, lose weight and stop smoking.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Sex differences in Type 2 Diabetes affect Cardiovascular Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women with Type 2 diabetes are twice as likely to have coronary heart disease compared to men, and may also need more frequent and intense physical activity to lower their risk of having a heart attack or stroke, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement published in the association’s journal Circulation.

In the United States slightly more than nine percent of the population had diabetes in 2012, and the number of people with Type 2 diabetes is increasing at a rapid rate.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health says Everyone has a role in Diabetes Prevention, Education and Support

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – More than 29 million Americans, including more than 600,000 Tennessee adults, have diabetes. It is estimated one in every four people with diabetes does not even know he or she has the disease.

The Tennessee Department of Health is reminding Tennesseans during National Diabetes Month that diabetes is a disease that can be treated, and with some lifestyle changes some individuals can even prevent or reverse the course of the disease.

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American Heart Association says African-Americans with Depression more likely to have Strokes, Heart Attack

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – African Americans with major depressive symptoms – perceived stress, neuroticism, life dissatisfaction – had almost twice the increased risk of stroke and coronary heart disease, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Quality and Outcomes.

While depression is recognized as a consequence of stroke and coronary heart disease, a common term for the buildup of plaque in the heart’s arteries that could lead to heart attack, most studies have been conducted in white populations. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association moves toward faster guideline implementation

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The American Heart Association is launching a suite of new tools and resources that will help healthcare providers put into practice more quickly recommended guidelines for heart disease and stroke care. This brings to life the association’s new Guideline Transformation and Optimization (GTO) initiative to streamline the development and implementation of research-based guidelines that can improve patient outcomes.

GTO is launching in a step approach with the first focus on improving the use of guidelines for treating the more than 515,000 Americans each year who have a type of heart attack related to a condition known as non ST segment elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome (NSTE-ACS).

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American Heart Association says new recommendations green-light some Athletes with Heart Disease to compete

 

American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For the first time, joint recommendations may permit participation in competitive sports for some athletes diagnosed with a specific type of irregular heartbeat and for others who have an implanted medical device that regulates the heart’s rhythm.

The joint American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology scientific statement published in both the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association report shows Young Women less likely to be prescribed or take post-heart attack medication

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Young women are less likely than young men to be prescribed or to fill their medication after a heart attack, according to new research published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

It is recommended that both male and female heart attack survivors take ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers and statins to prevent another heart attack. Yet studies have documented that rates of medication use to prevent a recurrent heart attack are lower among women than men.

Women under the age of 55 are significantly less likely to be taking optimal medication one year after a heart attack.

Women under the age of 55 are significantly less likely to be taking optimal medication one year after a heart attack.

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American Heart Association reports Physical activity: more is better for Heart Failure Prevention

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Doubling or quadrupling the minimum federally recommended levels of physical activity lowered the risk of developing heart failure by 20 percent and 35 percent, respectively, according to research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Walking 30 minutes a day as recommended in the U.S. physical activity guidelines, may not be good enough — significantly more physical activity may be necessary to reduce the risk of heart failure” said Jarett D. Berry, M.D., senior author of the study and an associate professor of internal medicine and clinical sciences at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, Texas.

A review of 12 large studies found when exercise and physical activity was doubled or quadrupled heart failure risk was reduced by about 20 to 35 percent, respectively. (American Heart Association)

A review of 12 large studies found when exercise and physical activity was doubled or quadrupled heart failure risk was reduced by about 20 to 35 percent, respectively. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Blacks in all socioeconomic groups have poorer outcomes after Heart Attack

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Black patients and patients with low socioeconomic status have shorter life expectancies after a heart attack.

However, the largest racial differences in life expectancy after a heart attack occur in patients with high socioeconomic status, according to research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

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