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Topic: Heart Disease

American Heart Association reports Multi-Gene Test predicts early Heart Disease Risk

 

Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A risk score based on multiple genetic differences, or polygenic risk score, predicted significantly more cases of early-onset heart disease than standard tests for single genetic defects, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine.

“Our results provide convincing evidence that the polygenic risk score could be added to the genetic investigation of patients with very early coronary artery disease,” said study lead author.

The polygenic test predicted a high risk for early-onset heart disease in 1 out of 53 individuals, compared to 1 in 256 for the most frequent single genetic defect. (American Heart Association)

The polygenic test predicted a high risk for early-onset heart disease in 1 out of 53 individuals, compared to 1 in 256 for the most frequent single genetic defect. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Mental Stress-Induced constricted blood vessels more likely in Women

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In women with heart disease, constriction of peripheral vessels during mental stress affects the heart circulation more than men’s, potentially raising women’s risk of heart-related events and death, according to new research in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, an American Heart Association journal.

In most people, mental stress causes peripheral vessels to constrict. In people with heart disease, this effect can cause a reduction in blood supply to the heart muscle called “ischemia.”

Woman in Stress

Woman in Stress

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American Heart Association reports Unmarried Heart Patients face higher risk of Death

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Compared to married heart disease patients, being unmarried was associated with a higher risk of dying, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

This is the first study to show an association between marital status and death from any cause and heart disease-related death in a high-risk heart patient population. (American Heart Association)

This is the first study to show an association between marital status and death from any cause and heart disease-related death in a high-risk heart patient population. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health says Diabetes Prevention Begins With You

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – As the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, diabetes is the primary cause of kidney failure, lower-limb amputations and adult-onset blindness.

The Tennessee Department of Health encourages individuals to take the necessary steps to prevent this disease.

Increase your physical activity. Adults should do at least 150 minutes of moderate activity daily and children should get at least one hour of activity every day.

Increase your physical activity. Adults should do at least 150 minutes of moderate activity daily and children should get at least one hour of activity every day.

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American Heart Association says Plant based Diet associated with Less Heart Failure Risk

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Eating a mostly plant-based diet was associated with less risk of developing heart failure among people without previously diagnosed heart disease or heart failure, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

The study looked at five different dietary patterns and, according to the author, found that people who ate a plant-based diet most of the time had a 42 percent decreased risk of developing heart failure over the four years of the study, compared to people who ate fewer plant-based foods.

Side salad. (American Heart Association)

Side salad. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports High Blood Pressure redefined for first time in 14 years: 130 is the new high

 

American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Guidelines

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – High blood pressure should be treated earlier with lifestyle changes and in some patients with medication – at 130/80 mm Hg rather than 140/90 – according to the first comprehensive new high blood pressure guidelines in more than a decade.

The guidelines are being published by the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American College of Cardiology (ACC) for detection, prevention, management and treatment of high blood pressure.

Blood Pressure Chart. (American Heart Association)

Blood Pressure Chart. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Sudden Cardiac Death rates may be seven times higher among Young People with Diabetes

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Children and young adults with diabetes may be seven times more likely to die from sudden cardiac death compared to children and young adults without diabetes, according to preliminary research from Denmark presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Sudden cardiac death is defined as a sudden, unexpected death that occurs instantly or shortly after symptoms appear.

Children and young adults with diabetes were seven times more likely to die from sudden cardiac death compared to children and young adults without diabetes in a Danish study. (American Heart Association)

Children and young adults with diabetes were seven times more likely to die from sudden cardiac death compared to children and young adults without diabetes in a Danish study. (American Heart Association)

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Gobbling your Food may harm your Waistline and Heart says American Heart Association

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – People who eat slowly are less likely to become obese or develop metabolic syndrome, a cluster of heart disease, diabetes and stroke risk factors, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Faster eating speed was associated with more weight gain, higher blood glucose and larger waistline. (American Heart Association)

Faster eating speed was associated with more weight gain, higher blood glucose and larger waistline. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Teen Childbirth linked to increased risk for Heart Disease

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXWomen who became first-time mothers as teens were significantly more likely than older mothers to have greater risks for heart and blood vessel disease later in life, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers found that women reporting a first birth before the age of 20 scored significantly higher on Framingham Risk Score — a measure commonly used to estimate the 10-year cardiovascular risk.

Women who become teen-age mothers may be significantly more likely to have greater risks for cardiovascular disease later in life than older mothers. (American Heart Association)

Women who become teen-age mothers may be significantly more likely to have greater risks for cardiovascular disease later in life than older mothers. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Men develop Irregular Heartbeat earlier than Women

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Men develop a type of irregular heartbeat, known as atrial fibrillation, about a decade earlier than women on average, and being overweight is a major risk factor, according to a large new study published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

In atrial fibrillation, the upper chambers of the heart, or atria, quiver instead of beat to move blood effectively.

The risk of developing the irregular rhythm known as atrial fibrillation rises with increasing age and weight.

The risk of developing the irregular rhythm known as atrial fibrillation rises with increasing age and weight.

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