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Topic: Heart Disease

American Heart Association reports Brain Activity may be predictor of Stress-Related Cardiovascular Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The brain may have a distinctive activity pattern during stressful events that predicts bodily reactions, such as rises in blood pressure that increase risk for cardiovascular disease, according to new proof-of-concept research in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The new research, the largest brain-imaging study of cardiovascular stress physiology to date, introduced a brain-based explanation of why stress might influence a person’s heart health.   

A pattern of brain activity that occurs during psychological stress may predict bodily reactions, such as surges in our blood pressure, that increase risk for cardiovascular disease. (American Heart Association)

A pattern of brain activity that occurs during psychological stress may predict bodily reactions, such as surges in our blood pressure, that increase risk for cardiovascular disease. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health says Vaccines are Not Just for Children

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Preventing an illness is always better than trying to treat it once it occurs. That’s why doctors with the Tennessee Department of Health encourage people of all ages to talk with their healthcare providers about the immunizations needed for lifelong protection.

“Vaccines aren’t just for kids. They provide protection against many potentially serious and preventable illnesses that can strike an individual, a family or a community without warning,” said TDH Commissioner John Dreyzehner, MD, MPH.

Immunizations Prevent Serious Illnesses throughout Life.

Immunizations Prevent Serious Illnesses throughout Life.

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In spite of extraordinary progress, more needs to be done to save Women from Heart Disease, says American Heart Association CEO

 

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C.American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown and co-author of the study “Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs Regarding Cardiovascular Disease in Women” published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, issued the following comments:

“Cardiovascular diseases cause 1 in 3 deaths among women each year – more than all cancers combined. That’s why the American Heart Association first brought this critical issue to light through the creation of the Go Red For Women™ movement in 2004.”

Nancy Brown; Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association

Nancy Brown; Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association

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Clarksville Police Department provides Summer Pet Safety Tips

 

Clarksville Police Department - CPDClarksville, TN – Summer arrived at our door early in Clarksville and we’ve seen temperatures in the mid to upper 90s. CPD has already had three heat related, preventable dog deaths in our community and haven’t hit the hottest part of the summer yet.

In an effort to try and prevent further incidents of heat related deaths, the Clarksville Police Department, working in conjunction with Montgomery County Animal Care and Control, want to give pet owners some reminders/education about safeguarding your pets in hot weather.

Summer Pet Safety Tips

Summer Pet Safety Tips

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Too little sleep may raise risk of death in people with cluster of Heart Disease risk factors according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People with a common cluster of risk factors for heart disease and diabetes were approximately twice as likely to die of heart disease or stroke as people without the same set of risk factors if they failed to get more than six hours of sleep, according to a new observational study published in the association’s open access publication Journal of the American Heart Association. For those who got more sleep, the risk of death was more modest.

The study, funded in part by the American Heart Association, is the first to measure sleep duration in the laboratory rather than rely on patient reports and the first to examine the impact of sleep duration on the risk of death in those with a common cluster of heart disease risk factors.

Sleep and metabolic syndrome study. (American Heart Association)

Sleep and metabolic syndrome study. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Heart Failure Patients readmitted to the same hospital may have better outcomes

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – When patients with heart failure were re-hospitalized within a month, those who returned to the same hospital were discharged quicker and were more likely to survive, according to new Canadian research in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

In both Canada and the United States, ambulance policies usually require patients be taken to the nearest emergency room, even if a patient has recently been hospitalized somewhere else.

Time is important when seeking hospital care for acute events like heart attack or stroke, but for treatment of a chronic condition like heart failure, continuity of care seems to be more important, researchers said. (American Heart Association)

Time is important when seeking hospital care for acute events like heart attack or stroke, but for treatment of a chronic condition like heart failure, continuity of care seems to be more important, researchers said. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Golden Years are longer and healthier for those with Good Heart Health in Middle Age

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People with no major heart disease risk factors in middle age live longer and stay healthy far longer than others, according to a 40-year study reported in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Good cardiovascular health in middle age delays the onset of many types of disease so that people live longer and spend a much smaller proportion of their lives with chronic illness,” said Norrina Allen, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

A Healthy Heart in Middle Age Could Add Almost Four Years to Your Life After Age 65 and Save You $18,000 in Medicare Care Costs. Graphic shows these benefits for middle aged adults who don't smoke or have diabetes, maintain a normal weight, have good blood pressure and good cholesterol. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says “Bad” air may impact “Good” Cholesterol increasing Heart Disease Risk

 

Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Traffic-related air pollution may increase cardiovascular disease risk by lowering levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), commonly known as “good” cholesterol, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

Scientists have long known that air pollution increases the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis and heart failure, but are uncertain how the two are connected.

(At left), Air quality equipment monitors traffic-related air pollution on a New York City highway. (The MESA Air Study)

(At left), Air quality equipment monitors traffic-related air pollution on a New York City highway. (The MESA Air Study)

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American Heart Association says Depressed Veterans with Heart Disease face financial barriers to care

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationArlington, VA – Veterans with heart disease who are also depressed are more likely than those without depression to have trouble paying for medications and medical visits and often report delays in seeking medical care, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research 2017 Scientific Sessions.

More than 20 percent of veterans with cardiovascular disease also suffered from depression in 2013. (American Heart Association)

More than 20 percent of veterans with cardiovascular disease also suffered from depression in 2013. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Older Adults with Heart Disease can become more independent and Heart Healthy with Physical Activity

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Improving physical activity among older adults with heart disease benefits their heart health, independence and quality of life, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Physical activity helps reduce heart disease symptoms for patients with heart failure, heart attacks and stroke, and it also helps to improve the age-related erosions of strength, balance, and reduces frailty that particularly affect older heart patients.

Healthcare providers should emphasize cardiac rehabilitation when appropriate and provide individualized guidance on increasing daily physical activities for older patients with heart disease. (American Heart Association)

Healthcare providers should emphasize cardiac rehabilitation when appropriate and provide individualized guidance on increasing daily physical activities for older patients with heart disease. (American Heart Association)

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