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Topic: Heart Disease

American Heart Association says Heart Disease and Stroke continue to take a toll on lives

 

Statement from Nancy Brown, American Heart Association CEO

Predicted trend in increased Holiday Deaths Occurs

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Reports of sudden, unexpected deaths linked to heart disease and stroke command our daily news headlines, but seemingly even more so in these past few weeks. The untimely loss of so many deeply saddens us.

And it’s troubling to know that even though we have made massive strides in research toward treatment and cure, needless suffering and death from heart disease and stroke persist.

Cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading global cause of death. More than 17.3 million people die from heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases around the world each year.

CARDIAC ARREST occurs when the heart malfunctions and stops beating unexpectedly. Cardiac arrest is an "ELECTRICAL" problem. A HEART ATTACK occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked. A heart attack is a “CIRCULATION” problem. A blocked artery prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished by that artery begins to die. (American Heart Association)

CARDIAC ARREST occurs when the heart malfunctions and stops beating unexpectedly. Cardiac arrest is an “ELECTRICAL” problem. A HEART ATTACK occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked. A heart attack is a “CIRCULATION” problem. A blocked artery prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished by that artery begins to die. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association launches Center of Excellence accreditation for hospitals offering advanced treatment for heart disease

 

Hospitals receive AHA/ACC evidence-based guidance in treating the most complex heart patients

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Beginning January 1st, 2017, the American Heart Association (AHA) will offer advanced accreditation for hospitals that meet the high standards needed for treating the most complex cases of heart disease.

The Cardiovascular Center of Excellence designation is part of the association’s new accreditation collaboration with the American College of Cardiology (ACC).

Cardiovascular Center of Excellence Accreditation. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Medicare Should Compensate for Evidence-based Cardiovascular Disease Telehealth Services

 

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – A new policy statement issued today by the American Heart Association advocates that evidence-based telehealth services for heart disease and stroke should be covered by Medicare. The statement highlights the effectiveness of using telehealth to treat the 85 million Americans suffering from cardiovascular diseases (CVD).

Telehealth is defined as the use of telecommunications and information technologies to share information and provide clinical care, education, public health and administrative services at a distance.

CVD and stroke cost the U.S. health care system over $320 billion and $33 billion, respectively, each year.  (American Heart Association)

CVD and stroke cost the U.S. health care system over $320 billion and $33 billion, respectively, each year. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Agencies Provide Guidance as Devastating Wildfires Impact East Tennessee

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – The Tennessee Department of Health, the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation are urging residents of East Tennessee areas affected by devastating wildfires to protect themselves and their families from smoke.

While inhaling smoke may adversely affect anyone, those at greatest risk include the elderly, young children, pregnant women and those with existing respiratory conditions, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, COPD, or those with heart disease.

Smoke from devastating wildfires in East Tennessee areas can be damaging to your health.

Smoke from devastating wildfires in East Tennessee areas can be damaging to your health.

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American Heart Association announces New Online Recipe Hub Provides Consumers with One-Stop-Shop for Heart-Healthy Solutions

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – With the holiday season around the corner, the American Heart Association (AHA) is unveiling its first-ever online recipe hub where consumers can search for and bookmark favorite heart-healthy recipes in one simple location.

Available in both English and Spanish, the new recipe hub is hosted nationally by Fresh Avocados – Love One Today® and features more than 350 American Heart Association recipes, complete with nutritional information, and more than 100 short videos that highlight cooking techniques, hacks and tips.

American Heart Association - life is why «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Yo-Yo Dieting Dangerous even if you’re not Overweight

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Repeatedly losing and regaining weight, known as weight cycling or yo-yo dieting, may increase the risk of death from heart disease among postmenopausal women who were of normal weight at the start of the study, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Normal weight postmenopausal women at the start of the study who lost and regained weight had: 3 and ½ times higher risk for sudden cardiac death and nearly 66% increased risk for coronary heart disease death. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Sugary Drink Sales drop nearly 20 percent after multi-faceted Campaign

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – After a multi-faceted campaign that included policy changes and community education efforts, residents of one Maryland county put fewer sugary drinks in their grocery carts, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Drinks loaded with added sugars are one of the leading sources of empty calories in the diet of both children and adults, and overconsumption of sugar is associated with obesity and an increased risk of heart disease.

This is the first study to measure the effect of a community led anti-sugary drink campaign using objective retail sales measures. (American Heart Association)

This is the first study to measure the effect of a community led anti-sugary drink campaign using objective retail sales measures. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Inherited Taste Perceptions may explain why some people eat too much Salt

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Inherited differences in taste perceptions may help explain why some people eat more salt than recommended, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

“Genetic factors that influence taste aren’t necessarily obvious to people, but they can impact heart health by influencing the foods they select,” said lead author Jennifer Smith, B.S.N., R.N., a Ph.D. student at the University of Kentucky College of Nursing.

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

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Age at Cancer Diagnosis may affect the Risk of Death from Heart Disease according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The age at which cancer survivors were diagnosed for cancer may help determine their risk of death from heart disease, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Heart disease has been known to be the leading cause of treatment-related, non-tumor deaths among survivors of childhood cancer, breast cancer and Hodgkin lymphoma.

For some types of cancer, the younger the age at cancer diagnosis, the greater the risk of heart disease. (American Heart Association)

For some types of cancer, the younger the age at cancer diagnosis, the greater the risk of heart disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association’s National Eating Healthy Day is Urging You to Be Colorful, Live Healthy

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – National Eating Healthy Day is Wednesday, November 2nd and as the American Heart Association’s new +color campaign emphasizes, it’s important to BE COLORFUL. Because as the old saying goes, “you are what you eat.”

On this iconic day, and throughout the entire month of November, the association wants to remind everyone that by adding more color to meals through fruits and vegetables, people can take simple yet significant steps to a more vibrant, healthier, longer life.

American Heart Association Healthy For Good. Be Colorful! You are what you eat. National Eating Healthy Day is November 2nd, 2016. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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