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Topic: Heart Disease

American Heart Association says Mental Stress may cause reduced blood flow in hearts of Young Women with Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Younger women with coronary heart disease and mental stress are more susceptible to myocardial ischemia (reduced blood flow to the heart muscle, which can lead to a heart attack), compared to men and older patients, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Coronary heart disease is a leading cause of death in American men and women, but studies show that younger women have higher rates of complications and death after a heart attack compared to their male counterparts.

Younger women with heart disease are more susceptible to reduced blood flow from mental stress compared to men and older patients. (American Heart Association)

Younger women with heart disease are more susceptible to reduced blood flow from mental stress compared to men and older patients. (American Heart Association)

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Increasing Evidence for Taxing Sugary Drinks to Improve Heart Health according to American Heart Association

 

Nancy Brown, American Heart Association CEO, comments on evaluation of sugary drink taxes in Berkeley, California published in the American Journal of Public Health.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In 2014, Berkeley, California paved the way in our nation once again with policies that support healthy living. Berkeley was the first city in our nation to implement a tax on sugary drinks at the minimum level recommended by the American Heart Association of one penny per ounce to raise revenue for improving community health and nutrition.

Researchers have assessed the initial impact of the Berkeley tax in a new study published in the American Journal of Public Health.

Increasing Evidence for Taxing Sugary Drinks to Improve Heart Health “These early encouraging results affirm what we had believed -- the tax motivated people to drink fewer sugary drinks and more water in the first year.” Nancy Brown, American Heart Association CEO comments on increasing evidence for taxing sugary drinks to improve heart health. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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Sedentary time may raise Heart Disease Risk – Sit Less, Move More says American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Being sedentary is not just a lack of exercise, it is a potentially independent risk factor for heart disease and stroke, according to a science advisory from the American Heart Association.

“Regardless of how much physical activity someone gets, prolonged sedentary time could negatively impact the health of your heart and blood vessels,” said Deborah Rohm Young, Ph.D., director of behavioral research at Kaiser Permanente Southern California in Pasadena and chair of the new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Sedentary time — even among physically active people — may be associated with an increased risk of heart disease, diabetes and more. (American Heart Association)

Sedentary time — even among physically active people — may be associated with an increased risk of heart disease, diabetes and more. (American Heart Association)

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Palliative Care Barriers Must be Addressed for Heart/Stroke Patients Says American Heart Association

 

New Recommendations Examine Ways to Improve Accessibility

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – A new policy statement on palliative care, issued by the American Heart Association, highlights how critical this care is to Americans with heart disease or stroke, and makes recommendations on how to address the current barriers that prevent many of these patients and their families from accessing it.

The statement points to the poor health-related quality of life patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke survivors experience as a result of deteriorating health, symptom distress and complex care regimens.

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Heart Disease, Stroke Risk factors may increase in severity before Menopause

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The severity of key risk factors for heart disease, diabetes and stroke appears to increase more rapidly in the years leading up to menopause, rather than after, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The study also found that this pattern of rapidly increasing risk factors before menopause appears to be more pronounced among African-American women.

As women go through menopause, doctors and other care providers can use this “teachable moment” to emphasize the importance of diet and exercise in reducing cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

As women go through menopause, doctors and other care providers can use this “teachable moment” to emphasize the importance of diet and exercise in reducing cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

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Major League Baseball Hall of Famer Rod Carew comes out swinging against Heart Disease

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Major League Baseball Hall of Famer Rod Carew knows he is lucky to be alive. Last fall, a heart attack, cardiac arrest and heart failure left him with a weakened heart and with a machine keeping blood pumping through his body.

It also left him with a mission: help boost awareness and prevention of heart disease. His ordeal prompted him to connect with the American Heart Association, offering his story and his voice to the fight against the number one cause of all deaths. The result is the Heart of 29 campaign, named for the jersey number he wore throughout his legendary career.

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American Heart Association says Pre-Stroke risk factors influence long-term future Stroke, Dementia Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – If you had heart disease risk factors, such as high blood pressure, before your first stroke, your risk of suffering subsequent strokes and dementia up to five years later may be higher, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

“We already know that stroke patients have an increased risk of recurrent stroke and dementia,” said M. Arfan Ikram, M.D., Ph.D., senior study author and associate professor, department of epidemiology, neurology and radiology, Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Everyone has regrets. Don’t let your Brain Health be one. Choices you make today can help prevent stroke and heart disease and keep you mentally sharp as you age. Avoid brain problems like stroke, memory loss and dementia by controlling your risk factors. (American Heart Association)

Everyone has regrets. Don’t let your Brain Health be one. Choices you make today can help prevent stroke and heart disease and keep you mentally sharp as you age. Avoid brain problems like stroke, memory loss and dementia by controlling your risk factors. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Blood Glucose Health is decreasing in Obese Adults; increasing risks for Type 2 Diabetes, Cardio Complications

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXBlood glucose health is deteriorating in obese adults, despite overall progress in lowering blood pressure and cholesterol levels, which may raise the risk of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers said their findings suggest that controlling weight in obese adults to reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes should be a public health priority. (American Heart Association)

Researchers said their findings suggest that controlling weight in obese adults to reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes should be a public health priority. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports an increasing number of U.S. Adults living with Congenital Heart Defects

 

American Heart Association Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – More adults are living with congenital heart defects in the United States, creating the need for more health services and tracking systems to collect data across all ages, not just at birth, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Congenital heart defects are structural problems with the heart present at birth. They are diagnosed in eight to 10 per 1,000 live births in the United States and are the most common type of birth defect, according to researchers.

More adults are living with congenital heart defects in the United States, creating the need for specialized health services and systems that track this medical condition across all ages. (American Heart Association)

More adults are living with congenital heart defects in the United States, creating the need for specialized health services and systems that track this medical condition across all ages. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Household Air Pollution linked to Higher Risk of Heart Attacks, Death

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Long-term exposure to household air pollution from lighting, cooking or heating with fuels, such as kerosene or diesel, may increase the risk of heart attacks and death, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Burning cleaner fuels, such as natural gas, was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular deaths.

According to the World Health Organization, one-half of the world’s population lives in poverty and burns fuels for lighting, cooking and heating purposes.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

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