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Topic: Heart Disease

Sleep disorders may influence heart disease risk factors says American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Sleep problems including sleeping too little or too long, may be linked to a variety of factors that may raise the risk for cardiovascular diseases, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

The first statement by the American Heart Association on sleep and heart health outlines what we currently know about sleep irregularities and cardiovascular-related risk factors, including obesity, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and atherosclerosis, arrhythmias, high blood pressure, stroke, unhealthy levels of triglycerides and cholesterol.

Research linking sleep problems to obesity and diabetes is robust, but longer studies measuring impact on actual weight are needed. (American Heart Association)

Research linking sleep problems to obesity and diabetes is robust, but longer studies measuring impact on actual weight are needed. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Preterm Birth leads to Smaller Kidneys, Higher Blood Pressure in Adulthood

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report Abstract 134

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – Premature birth cuts short kidney development, resulting in smaller kidney size and higher blood pressure in adulthood, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension 2016 Scientific Sessions.

“Adults born preterm may not present with the ‘classical’ risk factors for heart disease, but they are at increased risk of hypertension and insulin resistance and certainly require regular medical follow-up,” said Anne Monique Nuyt, M.D., senior author of the study and head of the division of neonatology at the Sainte-Justine University Hospital and Research Center of the University of Montreal, Canada.

Being born extremely early leads to smaller kidneys and higher blood pressure in adulthood. (American Heart Association)

Being born extremely early leads to smaller kidneys and higher blood pressure in adulthood. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports link discovered between Preterm Birth and risk of Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report Abstract 45

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – Abnormalities in a type of cell involved in blood vessel development and healing may explain why adults who were born prematurely are at increased risk of high blood pressure and other heart alterations, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension 2016 Scientific Sessions.

Researchers at the University of Montreal compared the function of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) – which help maintain healthy blood vessels – taken from 30 young adults (21-28 years old) born very preterm (less than 29 weeks gestation) and 30 young adults born at term (37 or more weeks gestation).

Blood pressure cuff on a child. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff on a child. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association Urges Federal Investment in Physical Activity Following CDC Study

 

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C.   American Heart Association President Steven Houser, Ph.D., FAHA issued the following comments today on new research, released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), that examines “Physical Inactivity Among Adults Aged 50 Years and Older”:

“Physical activity can be one of the most potent medicines for overall health. Unfortunately, not nearly enough Americans choose to take it. According to a new CDC report, nearly 28 million Americans, ages 50 and up, are physically inactive.

Kids playing on a playground. (American Heart Association)

Kids playing on a playground. (American Heart Association)

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Lowering blood pressure’s top number could prevent 100,000-plus deaths a year according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report Abstract 241

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – More than 100,000 deaths could be prevented annually if adults with specific common risk factors for heart disease would engage in an intensive program to lower systolic blood pressure, the top number in your blood pressure reading, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension 2016 Scientific Sessions.

Researchers used the findings from the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT). which was  released in 2015.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Kids need to be Protected from toxic Secondhand Smoke

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Parents and policy advocates should take a “zero tolerance” approach to exposing children to secondhand cigarette smoke, which can be responsible for lifelong cardiovascular consequences in addition to respiratory and other health issues, according to a new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

American Heart Association says Kids need to be Protected from toxic Secondhand Smoke. (American Heart Association)

American Heart Association says Kids need to be Protected from toxic Secondhand Smoke. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Exercise can help keep Medical Costs Down

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Getting recommended levels of exercise weekly may help keep down annual medical costs both for people with and without cardiovascular disease, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Although it’s well known that regular moderate exercise reduces risk of heart disease, stroke, and chronic conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure, “our findings also emphasize the favorable impact on how much you pay for healthcare,” said Khurram Nasir, M.D., M.P.H., senior author of the study and director of the Center for Healthcare Advancement & Outcomes and the High Risk Cardiovascular Disease Clinic at Baptist Health South Florida in Coral Gables.

Patients with heart disease who met weekly guidelines for moderate to vigorous exercise saved on average more than $2,500 in annual healthcare costs. (American Heart Association)

Patients with heart disease who met weekly guidelines for moderate to vigorous exercise saved on average more than $2,500 in annual healthcare costs. (American Heart Association)

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Younger heart attack survivors may face premature heart disease death according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For patients age 50 and younger, the risk of premature death after a heart attack has dropped significantly, but their risk is still almost twice as high when compared to the general population, largely due to heart disease and other smoking-related diseases, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Mental Stress may cause reduced blood flow in hearts of Young Women with Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Younger women with coronary heart disease and mental stress are more susceptible to myocardial ischemia (reduced blood flow to the heart muscle, which can lead to a heart attack), compared to men and older patients, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Coronary heart disease is a leading cause of death in American men and women, but studies show that younger women have higher rates of complications and death after a heart attack compared to their male counterparts.

Younger women with heart disease are more susceptible to reduced blood flow from mental stress compared to men and older patients. (American Heart Association)

Younger women with heart disease are more susceptible to reduced blood flow from mental stress compared to men and older patients. (American Heart Association)

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Increasing Evidence for Taxing Sugary Drinks to Improve Heart Health according to American Heart Association

 

Nancy Brown, American Heart Association CEO, comments on evaluation of sugary drink taxes in Berkeley, California published in the American Journal of Public Health.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In 2014, Berkeley, California paved the way in our nation once again with policies that support healthy living. Berkeley was the first city in our nation to implement a tax on sugary drinks at the minimum level recommended by the American Heart Association of one penny per ounce to raise revenue for improving community health and nutrition.

Researchers have assessed the initial impact of the Berkeley tax in a new study published in the American Journal of Public Health.

Increasing Evidence for Taxing Sugary Drinks to Improve Heart Health “These early encouraging results affirm what we had believed -- the tax motivated people to drink fewer sugary drinks and more water in the first year.” Nancy Brown, American Heart Association CEO comments on increasing evidence for taxing sugary drinks to improve heart health. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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