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Topic: Heart Disease

American Heart Association Comment strongly refutes study findings on sodium consumption

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The American Heart Association strongly refutes the findings of a May 20th, 2016 article in The Lancet by Mente, et al, that suggest low sodium intake is related to a higher risk of heart disease and death.

On the contrary, the link between excessive sodium and high blood pressure – as well as higher risks of heart disease, stroke, heart failure and kidney disease – is indisputable. Lowering sodium is more important than ever.

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Final FDA Rules Guide Consumers Down the Path to Good Nutrition

 

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown issued the following comments on the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) final rules to update the Nutrition Facts label and the serving sizes of foods:

“Clear, easy-to-understand food labels will help put Americans on the path to healthy eating. The FDA’s final nutrition rules will ensure that consumers are empowered with the guidance they need to make healthier, more informed food choices that can reduce their risk for heart disease and stroke.

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American Heart Association reports nearly half of all Heart Attacks may be ‘Silent’

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Nearly half of all heart attacks may be silent and like those that cause chest pain or other warning signs, silent heart attacks increase the risk of dying from heart disease and other causes, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

A heart attack does not always have classic symptoms, such as pain in your chest, shortness of breath and cold sweats. In fact, a heart attack can occur without symptoms and it is called a silent heart attack (blood flow to the heart muscle is severely reduced or cut off completely).

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Statin use differs among Hispanic Adults at risk for Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In the United States, adults of different Hispanic/Latino backgrounds, at high risk for heart disease, varied significantly in their use of widely-prescribed cholesterol-lowering medications known as statins, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association. The difference was based on whether or not they had health insurance.

“These findings have important implications for preventing disparities in cardiovascular outcomes within the growing U.S. Hispanic/Latino population,” said study lead author Dima M. Qato, Pharm.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmacy systems, outcomes and policy at the University of Illinois in Chicago.

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Women with Endometriosis at higher risk for Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women with endometriosis – especially those 40 or younger – may have a higher risk of heart disease, according to new research published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

The study may be the first prospective investigation to examine the link between coronary heart disease and endometriosis – the growth of the tissue that lines the uterus (the endometrium) – outside the uterus. Researchers reviewed the records of 116,430 women enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study II. Endometriosis was diagnosed using surgical examinations in 11,903 women by end of follow-up.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder may affect Blood Vessel Health in Veterans

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may decrease the ability of blood vessels to dilate, raising the risk of heart attack and stroke in veterans, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

In the largest study to date on the impact of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on blood vessel health, researchers found that blood vessels of veterans with PTSD were unable to expand normally in response to stimulus – they were less reactive — compared to veterans without PTSD. Less reactive blood vessels are linked to heart disease and other serious conditions.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Stress management may enhance Cardiac Rehab, Improve Recovery

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Heart patients may benefit from cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) programs even more when stress management is added, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Cardiac rehabilitation programs do not routinely offer stress management, but this may change should demand increase. And because patients may be reluctant to ask for the programs themselves, the onus is on the physicians to recognize that stress management is important for the optimal medical management of patients,” said James A. Blumenthal, Ph.D., professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina.

Adding stress management into cardiac rehabilitation programs should be encouraged, researchers say. (American Heart Association)

Adding stress management into cardiac rehabilitation programs should be encouraged, researchers say. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports U.S. Heart Disease Rates decline overall; some Southern areas see less progress

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – While heart disease death rates have declined overall in the United States, there are dramatic differences in those rates among U.S. counties, including weaker declines found south of the Mason-Dixon Line, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

The findings reveal a notable geographic shift in death rates from heart disease since the early 1970s, emphasizing the importance of geography for heart disease prevention and treatment, according to Michele Casper, Ph.D., the study’s lead author and an epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention in Atlanta, Georgia.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Violence linked to early signs of Blood Vessel Disease in Women

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPhoenix, AZ – Experiencing physical violence in adulthood may increase the risk of women developing heart and blood-vessel disease, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific Sessions.

“Both society and the healthcare sector need to be aware of the importance of exposure to violence and its impact, not only on social well-being, but also on women’s long-term health,” said Mario Flores, M.D., study lead author and research assistant at the National Institute of Public Health in Mexico City, Mexico.

Blood flow blocked in brain. (American Heart Association)

Blood flow blocked in brain. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says a ten percent price change could prevent Heart Disease and Death

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPhoenix, AZ – A ten percent drop in price for healthy foods and a ten percent increase in the price of unhealthy foods could potentially prevent a significant number of people from dying from heart disease and stroke, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific 2016 meeting.

Decreasing the price of fruits, vegetables and grains by ten percent, while increasing the price of sugary drinks by ten percent, could prevent 515,000 deaths from cardiovascular disease over 20 years. (American Heart Association)

Decreasing the price of fruits, vegetables and grains by ten percent, while increasing the price of sugary drinks by ten percent, could prevent 515,000 deaths from cardiovascular disease over 20 years. (American Heart Association)

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