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Topic: Heart Failure

American Heart Association reports Women, Men with Heart Failure both benefit from Implanted Defibrillators

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women with heart failure benefit from implantable cardiac defibrillators as much as men, according to new research in Circulation: Heart Failure, an American Heart Association journal.

“Despite current guidelines recommending that health practitioners consider adding these devices to standard heart failure treatments in both women and men, women with heart failure have been less likely to receive defibrillators. These new data reinforce the existing gender-neutral guidelines,” said Emily Zeitler, M.D., lead author of the study and a cardiology and research fellow at the Duke Clinical Research Institute in Durham, North Carolina.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association gives Seven Healthy Heart measures may reduce Heart Failure Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People scoring well on the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 checklist for a healthy heart are less likely to develop heart failure, a condition that reduces blood and oxygen flow to the body, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Heart Failure.

Life’s Simple 7 encompasses seven measures that people can use to rate their heart health and take steps to improve it. The measures are: manage blood pressure, control cholesterol, reduce blood sugar, get physically active, eat better, lose weight and stop smoking.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Social and Practical Barriers keep Heart Failure Patients from benefits of Exercise Therapy

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Although supervised aerobic physical activity is a proven therapy for heart failure patients, lack of social support and practical barriers such as lack of transportation, keep many patients from benefitting from cardiac rehab programs, according to new research in Circulation: Heart Failure, an American Heart Association journal.

Yoga

Yoga

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American Heart Association reports Physical activity: more is better for Heart Failure Prevention

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Doubling or quadrupling the minimum federally recommended levels of physical activity lowered the risk of developing heart failure by 20 percent and 35 percent, respectively, according to research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Walking 30 minutes a day as recommended in the U.S. physical activity guidelines, may not be good enough — significantly more physical activity may be necessary to reduce the risk of heart failure” said Jarett D. Berry, M.D., senior author of the study and an associate professor of internal medicine and clinical sciences at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, Texas.

A review of 12 large studies found when exercise and physical activity was doubled or quadrupled heart failure risk was reduced by about 20 to 35 percent, respectively. (American Heart Association)

A review of 12 large studies found when exercise and physical activity was doubled or quadrupled heart failure risk was reduced by about 20 to 35 percent, respectively. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says the result of eating too much Salt can be measured in Blood Pressure

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People who gradually increase the amount of salt in their diet and people who habitually eat a higher salt diet both face an increased risk of developing high blood pressure, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

In a Japanese study of more than 4,000 people who had normal blood pressure, almost 23 percent developed high blood pressure over a three year period. Those who ate the most salt were the most likely to have high blood pressure by the end of the study. Participants who gradually increased their sodium intake also showed gradually higher blood pressure.

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association survey reveals Americans have potentially dangerous misconceptions about Heart Failure

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Nearly six million Americans currently live with heart failure, yet a recent national survey found potentially dangerous misconceptions and knowledge gaps about the disease.

In fact, nearly half of those surveyed got fundamental facts about heart failure wrong and two-thirds of respondents confused signs of heart failure with signs of a heart attack.

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American Heart Association says Moms’ Pre-Pregnancy Weight impacts risk of dying decades later

 

American Heart AssociationChicago, IL – Adults whose mothers were overweight or obese before pregnancy have a dramatically elevated risk of dying from heart disease or stroke, according to a new study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2014.

“Excess weight among young women of childbearing age has important implications not only for their own health, but for that of their children as well,” said Michael Mendelson, M.D., S.M., the study’s lead author and a research fellow at the Framingham Heart Study, Boston University and the Boston Children’s Hospital.

Previous studies had shown that people whose mothers were overweight before pregnancy were at higher risk for obesity, diabetes and elevated cholesterol. This study examined whether that translated into higher rates of cardiovascular disease and death. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says restricting Calories may improve Sleep Apnea, Blood Pressure in Obese People

 

American Heart AssociationSan Francisco, CA – Restricting calories may improve obstructive sleep apnea and reduce high blood pressure in obese adults, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s High Blood Pressure Research Scientific Sessions 2014.

People with sleep apnea may experience pauses in breathing five to 30 times per hour or more while sleeping. It prevents restful sleep and is associated with high blood pressure, arrhythmia (abnormal heart rhythm), stroke and heart failure.

Sleep Apnea - Woman wearing CPAP. (American Heart Association)

Sleep Apnea – Woman wearing CPAP. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says an hour of Moderate Exercise a day may decrease Heart Failure Risk

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Exercising each day can help keep the doctor away.

In a new study reported in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Heart Failure, researchers say more than an hour of moderate or half an hour of vigorous exercise per day may lower your risk of heart failure by 46 percent.

The more active you are, the greater your protection from heart failure. (American Heart Association)

The more active you are, the greater your protection from heart failure. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Hospitalizations, Deaths from Heart Disease, Stroke drop in last decade

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – U.S. hospitalizations and deaths from heart disease and stroke dropped significantly in the last decade, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

“Interestingly, these improvements happened in a period when there were no real ‘miracle’ clinical advancements,” said Harlan Krumholz, M.D., S.M., lead author of the “most comprehensive report card to-date” on America’s progress in heart disease and stroke prevention and treatment. “Rather, we saw consistent improvements in the use of evidence-based treatments and medications and an increase in quality improvement initiatives using registries and other data to track performance and support improvement efforts — as well as a strong emphasis on heart-healthy lifestyles and behaviors.”

Blood flow blocked in brain. (American Heart Association)

Blood flow blocked in brain. (American Heart Association)

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