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Topic: Hemisphere

NASA reports the Magnetic Field of our Sun is about to Reverse

 

Written by Tony Phillips
Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Something big is about to happen on the sun. According to measurements from NASA-supported observatories, the sun’s vast magnetic field is about to flip.

“It looks like we’re no more than three to four months away from a complete field reversal,” said solar physicist Todd Hoeksema of Stanford University. “This change will have ripple effects throughout the solar system.”

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NASA’s Cassini mission to Saturn garners Top Honor from the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum

 

Written by Jia-Rui C. Cook
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA’s Cassini mission to Saturn, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, has received the top group honor from the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum – the Trophy for Current Achievement. Representatives for Cassini will receive the trophy on March 21st at a black-tie dinner in Washington, D.C.

“Here we are some 15 years since Cassini launched and it’s amazing how well the spacecraft has operated,” said Charles Elachi, director of JPL. “Thanks to the superb work of both the development team and the operations team, Cassini has been able to show us the beauty and diversity of the Saturn system and, beyond that, to study what is really a miniature solar system in its own right.”

With giant Saturn hanging in the blackness and sheltering Cassini from the sun's blinding glare, the spacecraft viewed the rings as never before, revealing previously unknown faint rings and even glimpsing its home world. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

With giant Saturn hanging in the blackness and sheltering Cassini from the sun's blinding glare, the spacecraft viewed the rings as never before, revealing previously unknown faint rings and even glimpsing its home world. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA’s Cassini Spacecraft Spies Wave Rattling Jet Stream on Jupiter

 

Written by Jia-Rui Cook
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – New movies of Jupiter are the first to catch an invisible wave shaking up one of the giant planet’s jet streams, an interaction that also takes place in Earth’s atmosphere and influences the weather.

The movies, made from images taken by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft when it flew by Jupiter in 2000, are part of an in-depth study conducted by a team of scientists and amateur astronomers led by Amy Simon-Miller at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD, and published in the April 2012 issue of Icarus.

Following the path of one of Jupiter's jet streams, a line of V-shaped chevrons travels west to east just above Jupiter's Great Red Spot. (Image credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute)

Following the path of one of Jupiter's jet streams, a line of V-shaped chevrons travels west to east just above Jupiter's Great Red Spot. (Image credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute)

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NASA’s Cassini Spacecraft Captures New Images of Saturn’s Icy Moon Rhea

 

Written by Jia-Rui C. Cook
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – These raw, unprocessed images of Saturn’s second largest moon, Rhea, were taken on March 10th, 2012, by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft. This was a relatively distant flyby with a close-approach distance of 26,000 miles (42,000 kilometers), well suited for global geologic mapping.

During the flyby, Cassini captured these distinctive views of the moon’s cratered surface, creating a 30-frame mosaic of Rhea’s leading hemisphere and the side of the moon that faces away from Saturn.

NASA's Cassini spacecraft took this raw, unprocessed image of Saturn's moon Rhea on March 10th, 2012. The camera was pointing toward Rhea at approximately 26,019 miles (41,873 kilometers) away. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI)

NASA's Cassini spacecraft took this raw, unprocessed image of Saturn's moon Rhea on March 10th, 2012. The camera was pointing toward Rhea at approximately 26,019 miles (41,873 kilometers) away. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI)

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