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Topic: High Blood Pressure Medication

American Heart Association reports Adverse Events spike after Blood Pressure Meds go Generic in Canada

 

Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – One month after generic versions of three widely-used blood pressure drugs became available in Canada, hospital visits for adverse events spiked in generic drug users, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

Researchers in Quebec compared hospital visits and emergency room consultations among 136,177 patients, aged 66 years and older, who took one of three hypertension medications before and after their generic versions became available. The drugs – losartan (Cozaar®), valsartan (Diovan®) and candesartan (Atacand®) – are also used in patients with heart failure.

One month after generic versions of three widely-used blood pressure drugs became available in Canada, hospital visits for adverse events spiked in generic drug users. (American Heart Association)

One month after generic versions of three widely-used blood pressure drugs became available in Canada, hospital visits for adverse events spiked in generic drug users. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Low-Income Patients more likely to take Blood Pressure Medication when Doctor involves them in conversation

 

Circulation: Quality and Outcomes Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The key to getting low-income patients to take their blood pressure medications as prescribed may be as simple as a conversation.

Low-income patients with high blood pressure were less likely to take their medications as directed when their healthcare providers did not use a collaborative communication style or ask them about social issues such as employment, housing and partner relationships, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Quality and Outcomes.

Low-income patients with high blood pressure whose healthcare providers did not use collaborative communication styles or ask about social issues, such as employment and housing, were less likely to take their blood pressure medications as directed. (American Heart Association)

Low-income patients with high blood pressure whose healthcare providers did not use collaborative communication styles or ask about social issues, such as employment and housing, were less likely to take their blood pressure medications as directed. (American Heart Association)

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