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Topic: High blood Pressure

American Heart Association says Abuse and Adversity in Childhood linked to more Cardiovascular Risk in Adulthood

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children and teens who are abused, witness violence, are bullied or face other adversities are more likely to develop cardiovascular diseases in adulthood, according to a new scientific statement by the American Heart Association published in the Association’s journal Circulation.

The statement is based on a review of existing scientific research published in peer-reviewed medical journals that documents a strong association between adverse experiences in childhood and teen years and a greater likelihood of developing risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes earlier than those not experiencing adverse experiences.

Children and teens who experience abuse, bullying, neglect or witness violence and other forms of adversity are more likely to develop heart and blood vessel diseases as adults. (American Heart Association)

Children and teens who experience abuse, bullying, neglect or witness violence and other forms of adversity are more likely to develop heart and blood vessel diseases as adults. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Treating Gum Disease may help Lower Blood Pressure

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Treatment for gum disease, or periodontitis, significantly lowered blood pressure among Chinese patients at risk for developing high blood pressure, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Intensive dental treatment for gum disease lowered blood pressure up to 13 points. (American Heart Association)

Intensive dental treatment for gum disease lowered blood pressure up to 13 points. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports High Blood Pressure redefined for first time in 14 years: 130 is the new high

 

American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Guidelines

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – High blood pressure should be treated earlier with lifestyle changes and in some patients with medication – at 130/80 mm Hg rather than 140/90 – according to the first comprehensive new high blood pressure guidelines in more than a decade.

The guidelines are being published by the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American College of Cardiology (ACC) for detection, prevention, management and treatment of high blood pressure.

Blood Pressure Chart. (American Heart Association)

Blood Pressure Chart. (American Heart Association)

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Gobbling your Food may harm your Waistline and Heart says American Heart Association

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – People who eat slowly are less likely to become obese or develop metabolic syndrome, a cluster of heart disease, diabetes and stroke risk factors, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Faster eating speed was associated with more weight gain, higher blood glucose and larger waistline. (American Heart Association)

Faster eating speed was associated with more weight gain, higher blood glucose and larger waistline. (American Heart Association)

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Low sodium-DASH diet combination dramatically lowers blood pressure in hypertensive adults

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – A combination of reduced sodium intake and the DASH diet lowers blood pressure in adults with hypertension, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Teens also at risk for Organ Damage from High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationSan Francisco, CA – Organ damage from high blood pressure doesn’t only occur in adults; it can also happen in teenagers, according to research presented today at the American Heart Association (AHA) Council on Hypertension, AHA Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions 2017 in San Francisco.

Blood pressure cuff on a child. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff on a child. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Adults without Partners Monitor their Blood Pressure less frequently

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationSan Francisco, CA – Having a lower education level and no partner is associated with a lower frequency of home blood pressure monitoring, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension 2017 Scientific Sessions.

Researchers assessed the data of 6,113 U.S. adults from the 2013-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

Adults who have and are being treated for high blood pressure show higher rates of home monitoring. (American Heart Association)

Adults who have and are being treated for high blood pressure show higher rates of home monitoring. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says High Blood Pressure reasons differ by gender in teens; young adults

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationSan Francisco, CA – There are marked gender differences in what drives blood pressure in middle-age in adulthood, suggesting the need for gender-specific treatments for high blood pressure, according to research presented today at the American Heart Association (AHA) Council on Hypertension, AHA Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions 2017, in San Francisco.

Gender matters when it comes to what’s most likely to elevate blood pressure in young to middle-aged adults. (American Heart Association)

Gender matters when it comes to what’s most likely to elevate blood pressure in young to middle-aged adults. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Women with Pregnancy Complication may have impaired Heart Function after Delivery

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationSan Francisco, CA – Women who develop preeclampsia earlier in pregnancy are more likely to have thickening in their heart’s left ventricle one month after delivery.

The changes were more severe among women who developed the condition early – before the 34th week of pregnancy, according to research presented today at the American Heart Association (AHA) Council on Hypertension, AHA Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions 2017, in San Francisco.

The heart muscle changes were more severe among women who developed preeclampsia before 34 weeks of pregnancy. (American Heart Association)

The heart muscle changes were more severe among women who developed preeclampsia before 34 weeks of pregnancy. (American Heart Association)

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Risk of heart disease in urban ‘food deserts’ is associated with individual’s income, rather than access to healthy food

 

Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The risk for developing cardiovascular disease is higher in individuals living in low income neighborhoods or with lower personal income regardless of their access to healthy food, according to new research published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

The study, conducted by Emory University School of Medicine, focused on the effects of income, education and socioeconomic status on healthy people living in urban food deserts in the Atlanta metropolitan area.

Cardiovascular disease risk is higher in people with low income or who live in low income neighborhoods regardless of their access to healthy food. (American Heart Association)

Cardiovascular disease risk is higher in people with low income or who live in low income neighborhoods regardless of their access to healthy food. (American Heart Association)

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