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Topic: High blood Pressure

American Heart Association says better options needed for Children at higher risk of Premature Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXObesity and severe obesity in childhood and adolescence have been added to the list of conditions that put children and teens at increased risk for premature heart disease, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association published in the Association’s journal Circulation.

New developments in identifying and treating the increased risk of premature heart disease in children and teens with certain medical conditions associated with increased cardiovascular risk are discussed in a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. (American Heart Association)

New developments in identifying and treating the increased risk of premature heart disease in children and teens with certain medical conditions associated with increased cardiovascular risk are discussed in a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Diet Drinks may be associated with Strokes among Post-Menopausal Women

 

American Heart Association Stroke Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Among post-menopausal women, drinking multiple diet drinks daily was associated with an increase in the risk of having a stroke caused by a blocked artery, especially small arteries, according to research published in Stroke, a journal of the American Heart Association.

In a large observational study, women who reported drinking more than one diet soda or other artificially sweetened drink a day had a higher risk of strokes caused by a blood clot. (American Heart Association)

In a large observational study, women who reported drinking more than one diet soda or other artificially sweetened drink a day had a higher risk of strokes caused by a blood clot. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Smoke-free policies associated with Lower Blood Pressure

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Smoke-free policies have been associated with lower systolic (top number) blood pressure readings among non-smokers, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

While smoke-free policies – laws that prohibit smoking in public places like bars and restaurants – have been associated with reduced rates of hospitalization for heart disease, previous studies have not examined changes in blood pressure.

Non-smokers who had access to smoke-free restaurants, bars and workplaces had lower systolic blood pressure readings than those who lived in areas without smoke-free laws. (American Heart Association)

Non-smokers who had access to smoke-free restaurants, bars and workplaces had lower systolic blood pressure readings than those who lived in areas without smoke-free laws. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Sleepiness common among Black Women, may be linked to High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationChicago, IL – Poor sleep habits may be related to low levels of physical activity, high blood pressure and obesity among black women, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association’s Joint Hypertension 2018 Scientific Sessions, an annual conference focused on recent advances in hypertension research.

In a study with black women who are overweight or obese, nearly half reported sleeping less than 7 hours at night, and many also reported daytime sleepiness. (American Heart Association)

In a study with black women who are overweight or obese, nearly half reported sleeping less than 7 hours at night, and many also reported daytime sleepiness. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Children with Food Insecurity at risk for High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationChicago, IL – Kids with food insecurity, meaning they lack good access to nutritional foods, were more likely to have high blood pressure than kids with secure access to food, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Joint Hypertension 2018 Scientific Sessions.

“High blood pressure — even in childhood — matters,” said study author Andrew Michael South, M.D., assistant professor of pediatric nephrology at Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Blood pressure cuff on a child. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff on a child. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Obesity in Young Women may set the stage for Heart Complications during and after Pregnancy

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationSan Antonio, TX – Even in young women, obesity may potentially lead to heart complications during and after pregnancy, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Basic Cardiovascular Sciences Scientific Sessions, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in basic cardiovascular science.  

Obesity is a risk factor for preeclampsia, a type of dangerous high blood pressure that can occur during the second half of pregnancy and leaves women more prone to high blood pressure and heart disease later in life.  

Obesity may potentially lead to preeclampsia, a form of dangerous high blood pressure that can occur during the second half of pregnancy. (American Heart Association)

Obesity may potentially lead to preeclampsia, a form of dangerous high blood pressure that can occur during the second half of pregnancy. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Being Overweight may change Young Adults’ Heart Structure, Function

 

American Heart Association Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Even as a young adult, being overweight may cause higher blood pressure and thicken heart muscle, setting the stage for heart disease later in life, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation. 

The study is the first to explore if higher body mass index (BMI) – a weight-for-height index – results in adverse effects on the cardiovascular system in young adults.

Being overweight may cause higher blood pressure and changes to the heart’s structure, even in young adults. (American Heart Association)

Being overweight may cause higher blood pressure and changes to the heart’s structure, even in young adults. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says most Black Adults have High Blood Pressure before age 55

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Approximately 75 percent of black and men women are likely to develop high blood pressure by the age of 55, compared to 55 percent of white men and 40 percent of white women in the same age range, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Man checking blood pressure at office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

Man checking blood pressure at office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Young Binge Drinkers may have Higher Heart Risks

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Young adults who frequently binge drink were more likely to have certain risk factors for cardiovascular disease than non-binge drinkers, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

“Compared to previous generations, the pervasiveness, intensity (number of drinks) and regularity (several times per week) of binge drinking may place today’s young adult at greater risk for more profound rates of alcohol-attributable harm,” said Mariann Piano, Ph.D., R.N., study lead author and Nancy and Hilliard Travis Chair in Nursing and Senior Associate Dean for Research at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing in Nashville, Tennessee.

Young men who reported that they repeatedly binge drink had higher systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol while young women who repeatedly binge drink had higher blood sugar levels compared to non-binge drinkers. (American Heart Association)

Young men who reported that they repeatedly binge drink had higher systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol while young women who repeatedly binge drink had higher blood sugar levels compared to non-binge drinkers. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Stroke survivors could gain the most from new Blood Pressure Guidelines

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Treating high blood pressure in stroke survivors more aggressively, could cut deaths by one-third, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

“The potential to reduce mortality and recurrent stroke is immense, because more than half of all strokes are attributable to uncontrolled high blood pressure,” said Alain Lekoubou, M.D., M.S., study lead author and clinical instructor in neurology at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston.

If stroke survivors were treated so their blood pressures reach the new target of less than 130/80 mmHg, deaths might be cut 33 percent compared with previous guidelines with a higher target blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

If stroke survivors were treated so their blood pressures reach the new target of less than 130/80 mmHg, deaths might be cut 33 percent compared with previous guidelines with a higher target blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

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