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Topic: High blood Pressure

American Heart Association says Kicking the Salt Shaker habit may not be enough

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Restaurant foods and commercially processed foods sold in stores accounted for about 70 percent of dietary sodium intake in a study in three U.S. regions, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Sodium is an important contributor to high blood pressure, one of the leading causes of heart attack and stroke. The American Heart Association recommends a maximum of 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day, which is equivalent to 1 teaspoon of salt.

Salt added at home during food preparation or at the table accounted for a small fraction of dietary sodium. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Salt added at home during food preparation or at the table accounted for a small fraction of dietary sodium. (Copyright American Heart Association)

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Nearly 1 in 5 with highest cardiac risk don’t think they need to improve health according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Nearly one in five people who reported the greatest number of cardiac risk factors did not believe they needed to improve their health, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

While most people in the study at the highest risk for a heart attack were more likely to agree on needed health improvements, more than half of those perceiving this need identified barriers to change, which were most commonly lack of self-discipline, work schedule and family responsibilities.

A Canadian study found that nearly one in five of those at highest risk for a heart attack did not believe they needed to improve their health. (American Heart Association)

A Canadian study found that nearly one in five of those at highest risk for a heart attack did not believe they needed to improve their health. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association wants you to check your Blood Pressure

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – As part of #CheckIt, the American Heart Association (AHA) ) – the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease –  wants people to check their own blood pressure by May 17th, World Hypertension Day, which is part of National High Blood Pressure Education Month.

Through World Hypertension Day, the American Heart Association is joining other organizations in striving to reach 25 million blood pressure checks globally (5 million in the U.S.). Also, participants are encouraged to log their action and learn about high blood pressure.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Depressed Veterans with Heart Disease face financial barriers to care

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationArlington, VA – Veterans with heart disease who are also depressed are more likely than those without depression to have trouble paying for medications and medical visits and often report delays in seeking medical care, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research 2017 Scientific Sessions.

More than 20 percent of veterans with cardiovascular disease also suffered from depression in 2013. (American Heart Association)

More than 20 percent of veterans with cardiovascular disease also suffered from depression in 2013. (American Heart Association)

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Patients who trust the Medical Profession are more likely to take their High Blood Pressure Medicine according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationArlington, VA – Patients with high blood pressure who had more trust in the medical profession were more likely to take their high blood pressure medicine than those with less trust, according to a new study presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2017.

Researchers at the University of California at Los Angeles found that patients who had higher levels of trust took their blood pressure medicine 93 percent of the time versus 82 percent of the time for those who had lower levels of trust.

Patients who had higher levels of trust took their blood pressure medicine more often than those who had lower levels of trust. (American Heart Association)

Patients who had higher levels of trust took their blood pressure medicine more often than those who had lower levels of trust. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Heart risks in Middle Age Boost Dementia Risk later in Life

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationHouston, TX – People who have heart disease risks in middle age – such as diabetes, high blood pressure or smoking – are at higher risk for dementia later in life, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017.

“The health of your vascular system in midlife is really important to the health of your brain when you are older,” said Rebecca F. Gottesman, M.D., Ph.D., lead researcher and associate professor of neurology and epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

Cardiovascular disease risk factors in midle age increase dementia risk later in life. Dementia was: 41% higher in smokers; 39% higher in people with high blood pressure; 77% higher in people with diabetes. (American Heart Association)

Cardiovascular disease risk factors in midle age increase dementia risk later in life. Dementia was: 41% higher in smokers; 39% higher in people with high blood pressure; 77% higher in people with diabetes. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health says Heart Disease Still Tennessee’s Top Cause of Death

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – While matters of the heart are top of mind near Valentine’s Day, more Tennesseans should think about them all year long to ensure healthier, longer lives.

Tennessee Department of Health data show heart disease is still the leading cause of death in the state, while stroke rated fifth in claiming lives.

Lifestyle Changes Can Save Lives

Lifestyle Changes Can Save Lives

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American Heart Association says Regular exercise may reduce High Blood Pressure risk in African Americans

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Regular swimming, biking or even brisk walks can help African Americans lower their chance of developing high blood pressure, according to new research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

“High blood pressure is a major health issue for many African Americans,” said Keith Diaz, Ph.D., lead study author and assistant professor at the Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health at Colombia University Medical Center in New York, New York.

Man checking blood pressure at office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

Man checking blood pressure at office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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Meal planning, timing, may impact heart health according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Planning when to eat meals and snacks and not skipping breakfast, are patterns associated with healthier diets, which could reduce cardiovascular disease risk, according to a new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

The statement provides a snapshot of the current scientific evidence suggesting when and how often people eat may impact risk factors for heart attack, stroke, or other cardiac or blood vessel diseases.

Planning and timing meals and snacks, such as not skipping breakfast and allocating more calories earlier in the day, might help reduce cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

Planning and timing meals and snacks, such as not skipping breakfast and allocating more calories earlier in the day, might help reduce cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

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Blacks, Hispanics less likely to achieve Blood Pressure Control according to American Heart Association

 

Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Blacks and Hispanics with high blood pressure are less likely than whites to get their condition under control, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

“High blood pressure is very common, and it is strongly linked to cardiovascular diseases like stroke, heart attack and heart failure,” said Edgar Argulian, M.D., M.P.H., senior study author and assistant professor of medicine and a cardiologist at Mt. Sinai St Luke’s Hospital in New York.

Lack of healthcare insurance and younger age increases the treatment and control gap between these minority groups and whites. (American Heart Association)

Lack of healthcare insurance and younger age increases the treatment and control gap between these minority groups and whites. (American Heart Association)

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