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Topic: High blood Pressure

American Stroke Association lists Five fast things you should know about Stroke

 

May is Stroke Month

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – You don’t need superpowers to be a hero when it comes to stroke, you just need to pay attention to the risk factors and know the warning signs.

“Stroke is largely preventable and treatable,” said Mary Ann Bauman, M.D., chair of the American Stroke Association Advisory Committee. “The best way to beat a stroke is to never have one – about 80 percent of strokes are preventable. The second best way to beat a stroke is to identify one immediately when it occurs and call 911.”

For American Stroke Month this May, the American Stroke Association’s Together to End Stroke™ initiative, nationally sponsored by Medtronic, offers five things everyone should know to be a Stroke Hero.

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American Heart Association reports Healthy Diet may reduce High Blood Pressure risk in Pregnancy-Related Diabetes

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women with pregnancy-related diabetes  (gestational diabetes) are at greater risk of developing high blood pressure later in life; however, a healthy diet may significantly reduce that risk, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Researchers studied 3,818 women with a history of pregnancy-related diabetes enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study II as a part of the ongoing Diabetes & Women’s Health Study. Over 22 years of follow-up, 1,069 women developed high blood pressure, which in turn increased their risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

A healthy diet may reduce the risk that women with pregnancy-related diabetes will develop high blood pressure later in life. (American Heart Association)

A healthy diet may reduce the risk that women with pregnancy-related diabetes will develop high blood pressure later in life. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Hispanics/Latinos at higher risk for Cardiac Dysfunction, Heart Failure

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Hispanics/Latinos have higher rates of cardiac dysfunction but are rarely aware they have the heart-pumping problem that can lead to heart failure, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Heart Failure.

Researchers found that about half of the 1,818 adults in their study of middle-aged and older Hispanics/Latinos had cardiac dysfunction, yet fewer than 1 in 20 participants knew they had a problem.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Yogurt may protect Women from developing High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPhoenix, AZ – Women who ate five or more servings of yogurt per week had a lower risk of developing high blood pressure compared to those who rarely ate yogurt, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific Sessions.

“No one food is a magic bullet but adding yogurt to an otherwise healthy diet seems to help reduce the long-term risk of high blood pressure in women,” said Justin Buendia, lead author of the study and a Ph.D. candidate at Boston University School of Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts.

Yogurt LowFat plain in cup with spoon verticle. (American Heart Association)

Yogurt LowFat plain in cup with spoon verticle. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Cardiovascular risk profile linked to profession in Older Workers

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPhoenix, AZ – Workers age 45 and older in sales, office-support or service occupations appear to have more risk factors for heart disease and stroke than workers in management or professional jobs, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 meeting.

Sales, office and administrative support employees: Sixty-eight percent had poor eating habits and 69 percent of sales employees did not have ideal total cholesterol and 82 percent of office and administrative support workers did not have ideal scores for physical activity. (American Heart Association)

Sales, office and administrative support employees: Sixty-eight percent had poor eating habits and 69 percent of sales employees did not have ideal total cholesterol and 82 percent of office and administrative support workers did not have ideal scores for physical activity. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Pre-pregnancy Heart Abnormalities may predict recurrent Preeclampsia Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women who had pregnancy-related high blood pressure multiple times had recognizable heart abnormalities between pregnancies that could help predict their risk for heart and blood vessel disease during subsequent pregnancies and even later in life, according to new research in Hypertension, an American Heart Association journal.

Pregnancy-related high blood pressure, or preeclampsia, is a serious disease that affects 3 percent to 8 percent of pregnancies. This study showed how cardiovascular abnormalities detected in non-pregnant women with a history of preeclampsia might identify the recurrent preeclampsia in subsequent pregnancies.

Healthcare providers should inform women who have had preeclampsia of their increased risk and monitor them for heart and blood vessel disease. (American Heart Association)

Healthcare providers should inform women who have had preeclampsia of their increased risk and monitor them for heart and blood vessel disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says African Americans, Hispanics face greater risk of Heart Failure

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – More than 915,000 Americans will be diagnosed with heart failure this year, according to the recently published American Heart Association 2016 Statistical Update.

Heart failure, a chronic, progressive condition in which the heart can’t pump blood efficiently to meet the body’s needs, is one of the most common heart diseases in the United States. In the next 15 years, the number of people living with the condition is expected to increase substantially – from 5.7 million to nearly 8 million by 2030 – and treatment costs will nearly double.

African Americans, Hispanics face greater risk of Heart Failure. (American Heart Association)

African Americans, Hispanics face greater risk of Heart Failure. (American Heart Association)

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American Stroke Association reports Rapid symptom improvement may not indicate better stroke recovery

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationLos Angeles, CA – Stroke patients whose symptoms quickly improved before hospital arrival did not always have better recoveries than other patients, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2016.

“Patients with very early rapid neurological improvement when first examined at the hospital still need to be considered for therapy to dissolve blood clots, given the high rate of unfavorable outcome,” said Clotilde Balucani, M.D., Ph.D., lead author and research assistant professor in neurology at The State University of New York Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn.

Doctors may consider administering clot-busting therapy to those patients whose stroke symptoms rapidly improved before hospital arrival. (American Heart Association)

Doctors may consider administering clot-busting therapy to those patients whose stroke symptoms rapidly improved before hospital arrival. (American Heart Association)

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American Stroke Association reports Pregnancy in older age increases Stroke, Heart Attack risk years later

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationLos Angeles, CA – Women who become pregnant at age 40 or older face a greater risk of stroke and heart attack later in life than women who become pregnant at a younger age, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2016.

“We already knew that older women were more likely than younger women to experience health problems during their pregnancy,” said Adnan I. Qureshi, M.D., lead researcher and director of the Zeenat Qureshi Stroke Institute in St. Cloud, Minnesota. “Now, we know that the consequences of that later pregnancy stretch years into the future.”

Women pregnant at age 40 or older face a greater risk of stroke and heart attack later in life than those pregnant at a younger age. (American Heart Association)

Women pregnant at age 40 or older face a greater risk of stroke and heart attack later in life than those pregnant at a younger age. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says recent Asthma may be linked with Abdominal Aneurysm Rupture

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Patients aged 50 and older with recent asthma activity were significantly more likely than non-asthmatics to experience abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture and sudden death, according to new research published in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, an American Heart Association journal.

The main artery in the body, called the aorta, carries blood to the whole body. When this vessel becomes weakened it can form a balloon-like bulge that may rupture and if left untreated can cause sudden death.

Asthma inhaler. (American Heart Association)

Asthma inhaler. (American Heart Association)

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