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Topic: High blood Pressure

American Heart Association says In-Womb Air Pollution Exposure associated with Higher Blood Pressure in Childhood

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children who were exposed to higher levels of air pollution during the third trimester of their mother’s pregnancy had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Fine particulate matter of 2.5 microns or less (PM2.5) is a form of air pollution produced by motor vehicles and the burning of oil, coal and biomass, and has been shown to enter the circulatory system and negatively affect human health.

Children who were exposed to higher levels air pollution while in the womb had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood. (American Heart Association)

Children who were exposed to higher levels air pollution while in the womb had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says study found people would rather pop a pill or sip tea than exercise to treat High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report Presentation

American Heart AssociationArlington, VA – In a survey to assess treatment preferences for high blood pressure, respondents were more likely to choose a daily cup of tea or a pill over exercise, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in quality of care and outcomes research in cardiovascular disease and stroke for researchers, healthcare professionals and policymakers.

Survey respondents were more likely to choose a daily cup of tea or a pill over exercise to “treat” high blood pressure in an imaginary scenario, but many didn’t think the interventions were worth the benefits. (American Heart Association)

Survey respondents were more likely to choose a daily cup of tea or a pill over exercise to “treat” high blood pressure in an imaginary scenario, but many didn’t think the interventions were worth the benefits. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Higher Blood Pressure before Pregnancy may Increase Miscarriage Risk

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Elevated blood pressure before becoming pregnant and early in pregnancy may increase the risk of pregnancy loss, even if the woman doesn’t have a hypertension diagnosis, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

“Elevated blood pressure among young adults is associated with a higher risk of heart disease later in life, and this study suggests it may also have an effect on reproductive health,” said Carrie J. Nobles, Ph.D., lead author of the study and a postdoctoral fellow in the Epidemiology Branch of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) in Bethesda, Maryland.

Women pregnant at age 40 or older face a greater risk of stroke and heart attack later in life than those pregnant at a younger age. (American Heart Association)

Women pregnant at age 40 or older face a greater risk of stroke and heart attack later in life than those pregnant at a younger age. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Bariatric Surgery for Severely Obese Teens may help prevent Premature Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Bariatric surgery is predicted to cut in half the risk of premature heart disease and stroke in teens with severe obesity, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

The researchers used a model based on research from the Framingham Heart Study that predicts the likelihood of heart disease events over a 30-year period.

For teens with severe obesity, the predicted 30-year risk of having a heart disease event, such as a heart attack or stroke, could be cut in half one year after bariatric surgery, according to a modeling study. (American Heart Association)

For teens with severe obesity, the predicted 30-year risk of having a heart disease event, such as a heart attack or stroke, could be cut in half one year after bariatric surgery, according to a modeling study. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Middle-aged Tooth loss linked to increased Coronary Heart Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Losing two or more teeth in middle age is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Having fewer natural teeth by middle age is linked to higher cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

Having fewer natural teeth by middle age is linked to higher cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Grilling and other High-Temperature Cooking may raise risk of High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Grilled or well-done beef, chicken or fish may raise the risk of developing high blood pressure among people who regularly eat those foods, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Among people who routinely eat meat, chicken and fish, those who grill, broil or roast these foods at high temperatures may be more likely to develop high blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

Among people who routinely eat meat, chicken and fish, those who grill, broil or roast these foods at high temperatures may be more likely to develop high blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association lists Top Heart Disease and Stroke Research advances of 2017

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – New medicines to fight heart disease, updated guidelines for strokes and high blood pressure, and research into genome editing are among the top heart disease and stroke advances in 2017, according to the American Heart Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease and stroke.

The Association, one of the top funders of heart- and stroke-related research worldwide, has been compiling an annual top 10 list of major advances in heart disease and stroke science since 1996. Here, in no particular order, are the organization’s picks for leading research accomplishments published in 2017.

American Heart Association identifies most impactful scientific discoveries for Heart Disease and Stroke. (American Heart Association)

American Heart Association identifies most impactful scientific discoveries for Heart Disease and Stroke. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Severe Pre-Eclampsia often leads to undetected High Blood Pressure after Pregnancy

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Lingering hypertension is common and may go unnoticed among women who have severe pre-eclampsia during pregnancy, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Pre-eclampsia, which is when a woman develops hypertension and elevated protein in the urine during pregnancy, occurs in three to five percent of pregnancies in the developed world. Recent studies have shown that women with pre-eclampsia are more likely than women with normal blood pressure during pregnancy to have high blood pressure post-pregnancy.

Hypertension commonly occurs in the year following pregnancy among women who had severe pre-eclampsia during pregnancy. (American Heart Association)

Hypertension commonly occurs in the year following pregnancy among women who had severe pre-eclampsia during pregnancy. (American Heart Association)

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American Stroke Association says a usually-ignored finding in the Kidneys may signal Stroke Risk

 

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationLos Angeles, CA – Sacs of fluid in the kidneys may indicate there is also blood vessel damage in the brain and a heightened risk of stroke, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

Heart disease is the Number 1 killer in the United States. (American Heart Association)

Heart disease is the Number 1 killer in the United States. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Combining Drugs that Lower Blood Pressure and Cholesterol could do more to prevent Stroke

 

American Heart AssociationLos Angeles, CA – Combining medication that lowers blood pressure with medication that lowers cholesterol reduced first-time strokes by 44 percent, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

Finger prick for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

Finger prick for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

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