Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: High blood Pressure

Young adults, especially men, fall behind in high blood pressure treatment and control

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Young adults, particularly men, lag behind middle-aged and older adults in awareness and treatment of high blood pressure, putting this population at an increased risk for heart attack and stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

High blood pressure is a leading risk factor for heart attack and stroke and is also a significant public health burden, costing the United States about $110 billion in direct and indirect costs in 2015, according to American Heart Association estimates.

Awareness, treatment and control of high blood pressure is significantly lower in young adults compared to middle-aged and older adults. (American Heart Association)

Awareness, treatment and control of high blood pressure is significantly lower in young adults compared to middle-aged and older adults. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Low-Income Patients more likely to take Blood Pressure Medication when Doctor involves them in conversation

 

Circulation: Quality and Outcomes Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The key to getting low-income patients to take their blood pressure medications as prescribed may be as simple as a conversation.

Low-income patients with high blood pressure were less likely to take their medications as directed when their healthcare providers did not use a collaborative communication style or ask them about social issues such as employment, housing and partner relationships, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Quality and Outcomes.

Low-income patients with high blood pressure whose healthcare providers did not use collaborative communication styles or ask about social issues, such as employment and housing, were less likely to take their blood pressure medications as directed. (American Heart Association)

Low-income patients with high blood pressure whose healthcare providers did not use collaborative communication styles or ask about social issues, such as employment and housing, were less likely to take their blood pressure medications as directed. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Fluctuations in home-monitored Blood Pressure may raise Dementia risk

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Whether or not you have high blood pressure, your risk of dementia may be higher if your pressure varies a lot from day to day, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Home monitoring of blood pressure may be useful to assess the future risk of dementia,” said lead study author Tomoyuki Ohara, M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor of neuropsychiatry at the Graduate School of Medical Sciences at Kyushu University in Fukuoka City, Japan.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association reports African Americans with Healthier Lifestyles had lower risk of High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Among African Americans, small health improvements were associated with lower risk of developing high blood pressure, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

African Americans who had at least two modifiable healthy behaviors at the beginning of the study, compared to those with one or none, researchers found the risk of high blood pressure at follow-up was reduced by 20 percent.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Breastfeeding may reduce a Mother’s Heart Attack and Stroke Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Breastfeeding is not only healthy for babies, it may also reduce a mother’s risk of having a heart attack or stroke later in life, according to new research published in of the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Previous studies have suggested that mothers get short-term health benefits from breastfeeding, such as weight loss and lower cholesterol, blood pressure and glucose levels after pregnancy.

A study of Chinese women found that the longer a mother breastfeeds, the greater the cardiovascular health benefit appears to be. (American Heart Association)

A study of Chinese women found that the longer a mother breastfeeds, the greater the cardiovascular health benefit appears to be. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Smaller Dose combos of Blood Pressure Meds may be effective with fewer side effects

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Quarter-dose combinations of blood pressure lowering medications appear to be effective in treating hypertension and result in fewer side effects for patients than a single dose of one drug, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

“Widespread control of blood pressure is generally low, even in high-income countries. The largest global survey of hypertension patients showed 88 percent of those aware of hypertension are treated with medications, but only one in three were able to gain control of their blood pressure,” said Anthony Rodgers, M.B.Ch.B., Ph.D., study author and professor at The George Institute for Global Health, University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia.

Combinations of smaller doses of blood pressure medications may lower blood pressure with fewer side effects, compared to standard single medication doses.(American Heart Association)

Combinations of smaller doses of blood pressure medications may lower blood pressure with fewer side effects, compared to standard single medication doses. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Kicking the Salt Shaker habit may not be enough

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Restaurant foods and commercially processed foods sold in stores accounted for about 70 percent of dietary sodium intake in a study in three U.S. regions, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Sodium is an important contributor to high blood pressure, one of the leading causes of heart attack and stroke. The American Heart Association recommends a maximum of 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day, which is equivalent to 1 teaspoon of salt.

Salt added at home during food preparation or at the table accounted for a small fraction of dietary sodium. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Salt added at home during food preparation or at the table accounted for a small fraction of dietary sodium. (Copyright American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Nearly 1 in 5 with highest cardiac risk don’t think they need to improve health according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Nearly one in five people who reported the greatest number of cardiac risk factors did not believe they needed to improve their health, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

While most people in the study at the highest risk for a heart attack were more likely to agree on needed health improvements, more than half of those perceiving this need identified barriers to change, which were most commonly lack of self-discipline, work schedule and family responsibilities.

A Canadian study found that nearly one in five of those at highest risk for a heart attack did not believe they needed to improve their health. (American Heart Association)

A Canadian study found that nearly one in five of those at highest risk for a heart attack did not believe they needed to improve their health. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association wants you to check your Blood Pressure

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – As part of #CheckIt, the American Heart Association (AHA) ) – the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease –  wants people to check their own blood pressure by May 17th, World Hypertension Day, which is part of National High Blood Pressure Education Month.

Through World Hypertension Day, the American Heart Association is joining other organizations in striving to reach 25 million blood pressure checks globally (5 million in the U.S.). Also, participants are encouraged to log their action and learn about high blood pressure.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Depressed Veterans with Heart Disease face financial barriers to care

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationArlington, VA – Veterans with heart disease who are also depressed are more likely than those without depression to have trouble paying for medications and medical visits and often report delays in seeking medical care, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research 2017 Scientific Sessions.

More than 20 percent of veterans with cardiovascular disease also suffered from depression in 2013. (American Heart Association)

More than 20 percent of veterans with cardiovascular disease also suffered from depression in 2013. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Page 1 of 1812345...»

  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On GooglePlusVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our Feed
  • Personal Controls

    Archives