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Topic: High blood Pressure

American Heart Association reports link discovered between Preterm Birth and risk of Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report Abstract 45

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – Abnormalities in a type of cell involved in blood vessel development and healing may explain why adults who were born prematurely are at increased risk of high blood pressure and other heart alterations, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension 2016 Scientific Sessions.

Researchers at the University of Montreal compared the function of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) – which help maintain healthy blood vessels – taken from 30 young adults (21-28 years old) born very preterm (less than 29 weeks gestation) and 30 young adults born at term (37 or more weeks gestation).

Blood pressure cuff on a child. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff on a child. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Genetically-Modified Probiotic may one day treat Pulmonary Hypertension

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report Abstract 9

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – An oral, genetically-modified strain of the probiotic Lactobacillus was used to treat rats with high blood pressure in the lungs, which resulted in reduced blood pressure, improved heart contractility, and reduced heart wall thickness, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension 2016 Scientific Sessions.

High blood pressure in the lungs is known as pulmonary hypertension. In pulmonary hypertension, the heart must work harder to pump blood from the heart through the arteries of the lungs, which puts added strain on the heart.

An oral, genetically-modified strain of the probiotic Lactobacillus was used to treat rats with high blood pressure in the lungs, which resulted in reduced blood pressure, improved heart contractility, and reduced heart wall thickness. (American Heart Association)

An oral, genetically-modified strain of the probiotic Lactobacillus was used to treat rats with high blood pressure in the lungs, which resulted in reduced blood pressure, improved heart contractility, and reduced heart wall thickness. (American Heart Association)

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Drinking alcohol daily may enlarge heart chamber; lead to atrial fibrillation according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Despite the common perception that moderate alcohol intake is good for the heart, new research suggests long-term alcohol consumption, even as little as one drink a day may enlarge the heart’s left upper chamber (atrium) and increase the risk of developing atrial fibrillation, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Daily, long-term alcohol consumption was associated with a five percent higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

Daily, long-term alcohol consumption was associated with a five percent higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Exercise can help keep Medical Costs Down

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Getting recommended levels of exercise weekly may help keep down annual medical costs both for people with and without cardiovascular disease, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Although it’s well known that regular moderate exercise reduces risk of heart disease, stroke, and chronic conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure, “our findings also emphasize the favorable impact on how much you pay for healthcare,” said Khurram Nasir, M.D., M.P.H., senior author of the study and director of the Center for Healthcare Advancement & Outcomes and the High Risk Cardiovascular Disease Clinic at Baptist Health South Florida in Coral Gables.

Patients with heart disease who met weekly guidelines for moderate to vigorous exercise saved on average more than $2,500 in annual healthcare costs. (American Heart Association)

Patients with heart disease who met weekly guidelines for moderate to vigorous exercise saved on average more than $2,500 in annual healthcare costs. (American Heart Association)

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Frazier Allen: The New Disruptors of Old Age

 

F&M Investment Services - Raymond JamesNashville, TN – The traditional wisdom among Silicon Valley’s youthful technorati is to design for what you know—texting your friends in Europe for free (WhatsApp), renting out your bedroom to make extra cash (Airbnb), finding a romantic partner without leaving your house (Tinder). But a handful of entrepreneurs are now looking beyond the millennial market to reach a new demographic with their own needs — baby boomers.

“You’ve got all these 20-something engineering types who are beginning to realize there are older adults who can make use of these products to promote health and well-being,” said Andrew Scharlach, Professor of Aging at the University of California, Berkeley. “What we are beginning to see is the marriage of product developers with the end users that they previously had not been aware of.”

From smart phones to smart homes, emerging technology is changing the way Americans approach aging — and Baby Boomers welcome the advances.

From smart phones to smart homes, emerging technology is changing the way Americans approach aging — and Baby Boomers welcome the advances.

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Younger heart attack survivors may face premature heart disease death according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For patients age 50 and younger, the risk of premature death after a heart attack has dropped significantly, but their risk is still almost twice as high when compared to the general population, largely due to heart disease and other smoking-related diseases, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

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Gallstone Disease may increase Heart Disease Risk reports American Heart Association

 

Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A history of gallstone disease may increase your risk of coronary heart disease, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology.

Gallstone disease is one of the most common and costly gastrointestinal disorders in the United States. Gallstone disease and coronary heart disease have similar risk factors, including diabetes, obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and poor diet.

A history of gallstone disease was linked to a 23 percent increased risk of developing coronary heart disease. (American Heart Association)

A history of gallstone disease was linked to a 23 percent increased risk of developing coronary heart disease. (American Heart Association)

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For the first time in history, High Blood Pressure is more common in Lower-Income Countries according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For the first time in history, people living in low- and middle-income countries have a higher prevalence of hypertension – or high blood pressure – than people living in high-income countries, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

A 2010 data analysis involving more than 968,000 participants from 90 countries found that more than 30 percent of adults worldwide live with high blood pressure, and 75 percent of those adults live in low- and middle-income countries.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Heart Disease, Stroke Risk factors may increase in severity before Menopause

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The severity of key risk factors for heart disease, diabetes and stroke appears to increase more rapidly in the years leading up to menopause, rather than after, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The study also found that this pattern of rapidly increasing risk factors before menopause appears to be more pronounced among African-American women.

As women go through menopause, doctors and other care providers can use this “teachable moment” to emphasize the importance of diet and exercise in reducing cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

As women go through menopause, doctors and other care providers can use this “teachable moment” to emphasize the importance of diet and exercise in reducing cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association New Initiative aims to reduce repeat Heart Attacks

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Every 42 seconds someone in the U.S. has a heart attack. Just after noon on March 26th, 2016, Julie Kubala, become one of those statistics.

She’s working now to ensure she doesn’t become a different one – about 21 percent of women and 17 percent of men age 45 and older will have another heart attack within five years of their first one.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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