Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Huntsville AL

TWRA reports One Boating Related Fatality, Nine BUI Arrests during Operation Dry Water

 

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency - TWRANashville, TN – The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) reports there was one boating-related fatality and nine boating under the influence (BUI) arrests made over a four-day span which included the Independence Day (July 4th) holiday and the annual Operation Dry Water.

The fatality occurred July 4th on Normandy Lake in Coffee County. According to witnesses, a 61-year-old man from Huntsville, AL, jumped off the back of a ski boat and swam away, but did not return. Individuals attempted to rescue the man.

Operation Dry Water «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Austin Peay State University graduate student captures video of three cottonmouth males fighting

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Austin Peay State University (APSU) graduate student Claire Ciafre captured a video on June 4th of three cottonmouth males fighting it out near Huntsville, Alabama.

The video starts with two cottonmouths jockeying in an Alabama swamp. Their heads sway above the water, each snake trying to find the best position.

Three male cottonmouths battle for the rights to mate with a nearby female near Huntsville, Alabama. (Screen captures from video/Claire Ciafre) Claire_Ciafre: Austin Peay graduate student Claire Ciafre captured the video on June 4 near Huntsville, Alabama, while doing research for her thesis.

Three male cottonmouths battle for the rights to mate with a nearby female near Huntsville, Alabama. (Screen captures from video/Claire Ciafre)
Claire_Ciafre: Austin Peay graduate student Claire Ciafre captured the video on June 4 near Huntsville, Alabama, while doing research for her thesis.

«Read the rest of this article»

Related Images:

Sections: Education | No Comments
 


NASA’s InSight Lander’s heat sensing spike revealed

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA’s InSight lander’s heat-sensing spike deployed on the Martian surface is now visible. Last week, the spacecraft’s robotic arm successfully removed the support structure of the mole, which has been unable to dig, and placed it to the side. Getting the structure out of the way gives the mission team a view of the mole – and maybe a way to help it dig.

“We’ve completed the first step in our plan to save the mole,” said Troy Hudson of a scientist and engineer with the InSight mission at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

On June 28, 2019, NASA's InSight lander used its robotic arm to move the support structure for its digging instrument, informally called the "mole." This view was captured by the fisheye Instrument Context Camera under the lander's deck. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

On June 28, 2019, NASA’s InSight lander used its robotic arm to move the support structure for its digging instrument, informally called the “mole.” This view was captured by the fisheye Instrument Context Camera under the lander’s deck. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA Dragonfly rotorcraft lander to fly around Saturn’s moon Titan exploring

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Saturn’s moon Titan will be the next destination for NASA in our solar system. Titan is the unique, richly organic world. Advancing our search for the building blocks of life, the Dragonfly mission will fly multiple sorties to sample and examine sites around Saturn’s icy moon.

NASA has announced that our next destination in the solar system is the unique, richly organic world Titan. Advancing our search for the building blocks of life, the Dragonfly mission will fly multiple sorties to sample and examine sites around Saturn’s icy moon.

This illustration shows NASA’s Dragonfly rotorcraft-lander approaching a site on Saturn’s exotic moon, Titan. Taking advantage of Titan’s dense atmosphere and low gravity, Dragonfly will explore dozens of locations across the icy world, sampling and measuring the compositions of Titan's organic surface materials to characterize the habitability of Titan’s environment and investigate the progression of prebiotic chemistry. (NASA/JHU-APL)

This illustration shows NASA’s Dragonfly rotorcraft-lander approaching a site on Saturn’s exotic moon, Titan. Taking advantage of Titan’s dense atmosphere and low gravity, Dragonfly will explore dozens of locations across the icy world, sampling and measuring the compositions of Titan’s organic surface materials to characterize the habitability of Titan’s environment and investigate the progression of prebiotic chemistry. (NASA/JHU-APL)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA InSight’s Team looks to get heat probe digging again

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA InSight’s heat probe has been unable to dig very far on the surface of Mars. Scientists and engineers have a new plan for getting the probe also known as the “mole,” digging again on Mars. Part of an instrument called the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package (HP3), the mole is a self-hammering spike designed to dig as much as 16 feet (5 meters) below the surface and record temperature.

But the mole hasn’t been able to dig deeper than about 12 inches (30 centimeters) below the Martian surface since February 28th, 2019.

Engineers in a Mars-like test area at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory try possible strategies to aid the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package (HP3) on NASA's InSight lander, using engineering models of the lander, robotic arm and instrument. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Engineers in a Mars-like test area at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory try possible strategies to aid the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package (HP3) on NASA’s InSight lander, using engineering models of the lander, robotic arm and instrument. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA’s path to the Moon runs through Alabama

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Since the earliest days of the NASA space program, the path to the Moon has run through Alabama. Today, work in the “Rocket City” Huntsville and across the state is advancing the largest rocket we’ve ever built and our Artemis Program to land humans on the Moon by 2024.

At a recent visit with the Huntsville Chamber of Commerce, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine demonstrated Alabama’s deep technical and economic contributions to our nation’s space program.

The largest piece of structural test hardware for America’s new deep space rocket, the Space Launch System, was loaded into Test Stand 4693 at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama Jan. 14, 2019. The liquid hydrogen tank is part of the rocket’s core stage that is more than 200 feet tall with a diameter of 27.6 feet, and stores cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen that will feed the vehicle’s RS-25 engines. (NASA/Tyler Martin)

The largest piece of structural test hardware for America’s new deep space rocket, the Space Launch System, was loaded into Test Stand 4693 at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama Jan. 14, 2019. The liquid hydrogen tank is part of the rocket’s core stage that is more than 200 feet tall with a diameter of 27.6 feet, and stores cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen that will feed the vehicle’s RS-25 engines. (NASA/Tyler Martin)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 


NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory discovers stars kicked from their Galaxies

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHuntsville, AL – Evidence that pairs of stars have been kicked out of their host galaxies has been found by scientists. This discovery, made using data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, is one of the clearest examples of stellar pairs being expelled from their galactic base.

Astronomers use the term “binary” system to refer to pairs of stars orbiting around each other. These stellar pairs can consist of combinations of stars like our Sun, or more exotic and denser varieties such as neutron stars or even black holes.

Binary stars ejected from Fornax cluster. (NASA/CXC/Nanjing University/X. Jin et al.)

Binary stars ejected from Fornax cluster. (NASA/CXC/Nanjing University/X. Jin et al.)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA’s race back to the Moon helped along by Michigan

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHuntsville, AL – Michigan is helping NASA work towards sending the first woman and next man to the Moon by 2024.   

Futuramic, a company with factories in Detroit and Warren, is one of more than 78 Michigan companies and 3,200 businesses across 50 states supporting NASA’s return to the Moon by supplying parts for the agency’s new deep space rocket, Space Launch System (SLS), the Orion spacecraft and Exploration Ground Systems.

Through NASA’s Artemis program, the agency will embark on a series of increasingly complex missions to establish a presence at the Moon for decades to come and learn the skills needed to send astronauts to Mars.

Technicians prepare the passive roller tool built by Futuramic in Warren, Michigan, to transport the massive liquid hydrogen fuel tank for NASA’s new deep space rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS), so that it can be joined to the top part of the core stage. The tool is enabling the construction of the rocket’s core stage that will be provide 2 million pounds of thrust to launch the Artemis-1 mission beyond the Moon. (NASA/Eric Bordelon)

Technicians prepare the passive roller tool built by Futuramic in Warren, Michigan, to transport the massive liquid hydrogen fuel tank for NASA’s new deep space rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS), so that it can be joined to the top part of the core stage. The tool is enabling the construction of the rocket’s core stage that will be provide 2 million pounds of thrust to launch the Artemis-1 mission beyond the Moon. (NASA/Eric Bordelon)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA looks to Advance Human Moon Landers with help from 11 American Companies

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA looks to put American astronauts, the first woman and next man, on the Moon’s south pole by 2024 and establish sustainable missions by 2028. In order to do so, NASA has picked 11 companies to conduct studies and produce prototypes of human landers for its Artemis lunar exploration program.

“To accelerate our return to the Moon, we are challenging our traditional ways of doing business. We will streamline everything from procurement to partnerships to hardware development and even operations,” said Marshall Smith, director for human lunar exploration programs at NASA Headquarters.

Illustration of a human landing system. (NASA)

Illustration of a human landing system. (NASA)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA’s Mars InSight Lander to learn from Dust Cleanings

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CACatastrophic dust storms have the potential to end a mission like NASA’ Insight Lander as it did with NASA’s Opportunity rover. The same winds that blanket Mars with dust can also blow that dust away. Far more often, passing winds cleared off the rover’s solar panels and gave it an energy boost. Those dust clearings allowed Opportunity and its sister rover, Spirit, to survive for years beyond their 90-day expiration dates.

Dust clearings are also expected for Mars’ newest inhabitant, the InSight lander. Because of the spacecraft’s weather sensors, each clearing can provide crucial science data on these events, as well – and the mission already has a glimpse at that.

This is NASA InSight's second full selfie on Mars. Since taking its first selfie, the lander has removed its heat probe and seismometer from its deck, placing them on the Martian surface; a thin coating of dust now covers the spacecraft as well. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This is NASA InSight’s second full selfie on Mars. Since taking its first selfie, the lander has removed its heat probe and seismometer from its deck, placing them on the Martian surface; a thin coating of dust now covers the spacecraft as well. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 



  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Instagram
  • Personal Controls

    Archives