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Topic: Hypertension

American Heart Association reports Adverse Events spike after Blood Pressure Meds go Generic in Canada

 

Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – One month after generic versions of three widely-used blood pressure drugs became available in Canada, hospital visits for adverse events spiked in generic drug users, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

Researchers in Quebec compared hospital visits and emergency room consultations among 136,177 patients, aged 66 years and older, who took one of three hypertension medications before and after their generic versions became available. The drugs – losartan (Cozaar®), valsartan (Diovan®) and candesartan (Atacand®) – are also used in patients with heart failure.

One month after generic versions of three widely-used blood pressure drugs became available in Canada, hospital visits for adverse events spiked in generic drug users. (American Heart Association)

One month after generic versions of three widely-used blood pressure drugs became available in Canada, hospital visits for adverse events spiked in generic drug users. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Blood Pressure better controlled with “MAP” for Doctors

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationSan Francisco, CA – A quality improvement program designed to better control hypertension in primary care practices notably improved hypertension control in six months, according to research presented today at the American Heart Association (AHA) Council on Hypertension, AHA Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions 2017, in San Francisco.

One in three American adults has high blood pressure. That number is steadily climbing, despite the fact that high blood pressure can be easily treated using evidence-based guidelines.

Blood Pressure Check. (American Heart Association)

Blood Pressure Check. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Adults without Partners Monitor their Blood Pressure less frequently

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationSan Francisco, CA – Having a lower education level and no partner is associated with a lower frequency of home blood pressure monitoring, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension 2017 Scientific Sessions.

Researchers assessed the data of 6,113 U.S. adults from the 2013-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

Adults who have and are being treated for high blood pressure show higher rates of home monitoring. (American Heart Association)

Adults who have and are being treated for high blood pressure show higher rates of home monitoring. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says High Blood Pressure reasons differ by gender in teens; young adults

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationSan Francisco, CA – There are marked gender differences in what drives blood pressure in middle-age in adulthood, suggesting the need for gender-specific treatments for high blood pressure, according to research presented today at the American Heart Association (AHA) Council on Hypertension, AHA Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions 2017, in San Francisco.

Gender matters when it comes to what’s most likely to elevate blood pressure in young to middle-aged adults. (American Heart Association)

Gender matters when it comes to what’s most likely to elevate blood pressure in young to middle-aged adults. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Maintaining Healthy Weight helps keep Blood Pressure Low through Life

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationSan Francisco, CA – New research shows maintaining a healthy weight throughout life – more so than four other health behaviors studied – is important to help keep blood pressure in check, according to research presented today at the American Heart Association (AHA) Council on Hypertension, AHA Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions 2017 in San Francisco.

Maintaining a healthy weight is a key health behavior to prevent blood pressure increases from young adulthood into middle age.

Maintaining a healthy weight is a key health behavior to prevent blood pressure increases from young adulthood into middle age.

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Young adults, especially men, fall behind in high blood pressure treatment and control

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Young adults, particularly men, lag behind middle-aged and older adults in awareness and treatment of high blood pressure, putting this population at an increased risk for heart attack and stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

High blood pressure is a leading risk factor for heart attack and stroke and is also a significant public health burden, costing the United States about $110 billion in direct and indirect costs in 2015, according to American Heart Association estimates.

Awareness, treatment and control of high blood pressure is significantly lower in young adults compared to middle-aged and older adults. (American Heart Association)

Awareness, treatment and control of high blood pressure is significantly lower in young adults compared to middle-aged and older adults. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports African Americans with Healthier Lifestyles had lower risk of High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Among African Americans, small health improvements were associated with lower risk of developing high blood pressure, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

African Americans who had at least two modifiable healthy behaviors at the beginning of the study, compared to those with one or none, researchers found the risk of high blood pressure at follow-up was reduced by 20 percent.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Smaller Dose combos of Blood Pressure Meds may be effective with fewer side effects

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Quarter-dose combinations of blood pressure lowering medications appear to be effective in treating hypertension and result in fewer side effects for patients than a single dose of one drug, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

“Widespread control of blood pressure is generally low, even in high-income countries. The largest global survey of hypertension patients showed 88 percent of those aware of hypertension are treated with medications, but only one in three were able to gain control of their blood pressure,” said Anthony Rodgers, M.B.Ch.B., Ph.D., study author and professor at The George Institute for Global Health, University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia.

Combinations of smaller doses of blood pressure medications may lower blood pressure with fewer side effects, compared to standard single medication doses.(American Heart Association)

Combinations of smaller doses of blood pressure medications may lower blood pressure with fewer side effects, compared to standard single medication doses. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Heart risks in Middle Age Boost Dementia Risk later in Life

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationHouston, TX – People who have heart disease risks in middle age – such as diabetes, high blood pressure or smoking – are at higher risk for dementia later in life, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017.

“The health of your vascular system in midlife is really important to the health of your brain when you are older,” said Rebecca F. Gottesman, M.D., Ph.D., lead researcher and associate professor of neurology and epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

Cardiovascular disease risk factors in midle age increase dementia risk later in life. Dementia was: 41% higher in smokers; 39% higher in people with high blood pressure; 77% higher in people with diabetes. (American Heart Association)

Cardiovascular disease risk factors in midle age increase dementia risk later in life. Dementia was: 41% higher in smokers; 39% higher in people with high blood pressure; 77% higher in people with diabetes. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Regular exercise may reduce High Blood Pressure risk in African Americans

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Regular swimming, biking or even brisk walks can help African Americans lower their chance of developing high blood pressure, according to new research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

“High blood pressure is a major health issue for many African Americans,” said Keith Diaz, Ph.D., lead study author and assistant professor at the Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health at Colombia University Medical Center in New York, New York.

Man checking blood pressure at office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

Man checking blood pressure at office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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