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Topic: International Space Station

NASA will connect Bigelow Expandable Activity Module to International Space Station, Saturday

 

Written by Cheryl Warner
NASA’s Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – The first human-rated expandable structure that may help inform the design of deep space habitats is set to be installed to the International Space Station Saturday, April 16th. NASA Television coverage of the installation will begin at 5:30am EDT.

The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) will be attached to the station’s Tranquility module over a period of about four hours. Controllers in mission control at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston will remove BEAM from the unpressurized trunk of SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft, using the robotic Canadarm2, and move it into position next to Tranquility’s aft assembly port.

This artist’s concept depicts the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module attached to the International Space Station’s Tranquility module. (Bigelow Aerospace)

This artist’s concept depicts the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module attached to the International Space Station’s Tranquility module. (Bigelow Aerospace)

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NASA takes a look at Scott Kelly’s Year in Space

 

NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Like all journeys off planet Earth, it started with a flash, and a roar.

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko blasted off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on March 27th, 2015. With a successful landing 340 days later on March 1st, 2016, the pair completed one of the most ambitious missions in the history of the International Space Station and opened a new chapter in human exploration.

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko aboard the International Space Station. (NASA)

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko aboard the International Space Station. (NASA)

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NASA says Machines of the future will Self Diagnosis themselves

 

NASA Headquarters

NASA Washington,D.C. – In the future, machines will monitor their own health and request help, themselves, when something’s wrong, predicts David Cirulli, engineering vice president and cofounder of CEMSol LLC.

“There’s going to be an integrated system-health engine as part of every system out there, and it will be able to interface with other systems and components,” says Cirulli. “That’s what’s missing today.” He compares the capability to how sick human patients can verbalize symptoms to a doctor, giving them the crucial information they need to diagnose a problem.

The IMS that CEMSol licensed from Ames Research Center to develop its ISHM software has also been applied to the Black Hawk helicopter engine. (U.S. Navy)

The IMS that CEMSol licensed from Ames Research Center to develop its ISHM software has also been applied to the Black Hawk helicopter engine. (U.S. Navy)

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NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly back on Earth after One Year aboard the International Space Station

 

Written by Stephanie Schierholz
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA astronaut and Expedition 46 Commander Scott Kelly and his Russian counterpart Mikhail Kornienko returned to Earth Tuesday after a historic 340-day mission aboard the International Space Station. They landed in Kazakhstan at 11:26pm EST/10:26 CT (10:26am March 2nd Kazakhstan time).

Joining their return trip aboard a Soyuz TMA-18M spacecraft was Sergey Volkov, also of the Russian space agency Roscosmos, who arrived on the station September 4th, 2015. The crew touched down southeast of the remote town of Dzhezkazgan.

NASA astronaut and Expedition 46 Commander Scott Kelly and his Russian counterpart Mikhail Kornienko enjoy the cold fresh air back on Earth after their historic 340-day mission aboard the International Space Station. (NASA TV)

NASA astronaut and Expedition 46 Commander Scott Kelly and his Russian counterpart Mikhail Kornienko enjoy the cold fresh air back on Earth after their historic 340-day mission aboard the International Space Station. (NASA TV)

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NASA reports International Space Station to harvest Zinnia Planets on Valentine’s Day

 

Written by Linda Herridge
NASA’s John F. Kennedy Space Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationKennedy Space Center, FL – Zinnia plants from the Veggie ground control experiment at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida were harvested February 11th in the same way that crew member Scott Kelly will harvest the zinnias growing in the Veggie system aboard the International Space Station on February 14th—Valentine’s Day.

Flowering plants will help scientists learn more about growing crops for deep-space missions and NASA’s journey to Mars.

The ground plants didn’t experience some of the same stressors as those grown simultaneously on the ISS — like unexpected fungus growth.

Zinnia plants from the Veggie ground control system are being harvested in the Flight Equipment Development Laboratory in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. From left, are John Carver, an integration engineer with Jacobs on the Test and Operations Support Contract, and Chuck Spern, a project engineer with Vencore on the Engineering Services Contract.(NASA/Bill White)

Zinnia plants from the Veggie ground control system are being harvested in the Flight Equipment Development Laboratory in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. From left, are John Carver, an integration engineer with Jacobs on the Test and Operations Support Contract, and Chuck Spern, a project engineer with Vencore on the Engineering Services Contract.(NASA/Bill White)

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NASA to use two CubeSats to test multiple Satellite Networking and Communications

 

Written by Julianna Fishman
NASA’s Small Spacecraft Technology Program

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA’s two Nodes small satellites hitched a ride to the International Space Station on the fourth Orbital ATK cargo mission, which launched on December 6th. Once aboard the station, the satellites will settle in for a two-to-three month stay until deployed into low-Earth orbit in early 2016.

The Nodes mission, which consists of two CubeSats weighing just 4.5 pounds each and measuring 4 inches by 4 inches by 6.5 inches, will test new network capabilities for operating swarms of spacecraft in the future.

NASA Small Satellites to Demonstrate Swarm Communications and Autonomy. (NASA)

NASA Small Satellites to Demonstrate Swarm Communications and Autonomy. (NASA)

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NASA reports Cygnus spacecraft launched on mission to supply International Space Station

 

Written by Steven Siceloff
NASA’s Kennedy Space Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationFlorida – A burst of smoke and column of flame trailed a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket Sunday afternoon as it powered a cargo-laden Orbital ATK Cygnus spacecraft onto an orbital path to rendezvous with the International Space Station in three days.

The mission will deliver experiments, equipment and supplies to the orbiting laboratory and its six-person crew of astronauts and cosmonauts. The enhanced Cygnus is carrying more than 7,000 pounds of materials that will directly support dozens of research investigations taking place in the unique environment of the station along with equipment for spacewalks and air tanks for the station’s atmosphere.

Orbital ATK's Cygnus cargo spacecraft launches aboard United Launch Alliance's Atlas V rocket on Sunday, Dec. 6, at 4:44:56 p.m. EST from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. (NASA/Tony Gray & Tim Terry)

Orbital ATK’s Cygnus cargo spacecraft launches aboard United Launch Alliance’s Atlas V rocket on Sunday, Dec. 6, at 4:44:56 p.m. EST from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. (NASA/Tony Gray & Tim Terry)

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NASA’s Kennedy Space Center set to be Spaceport of the Future

 

Written by Bob Granath
NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Florida

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationFlorida – On Thursday, December 3rd, NASA at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida will team with industry partners to launch science and supplies to the International Space Station. The event is one more example of how the goal of establishing Kennedy as a 21st century, multi-user spaceport for both government and commercial customers has been achieved.

As part of NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program, the Orbital ATK Cygnus OA-4 spacecraft will launch atop a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket.

On Dec. 5, 2014, a Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit. During the two-orbit, four-and-a-half hour mission, engineers evaluated the systems critical to crew safety, the launch abort system, the heat shield and the parachute system. (NASA/Sandy Joseph & Kevin O'Connell)

On Dec. 5, 2014, a Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station carrying NASA’s Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit. During the two-orbit, four-and-a-half hour mission, engineers evaluated the systems critical to crew safety, the launch abort system, the heat shield and the parachute system. (NASA/Sandy Joseph & Kevin O’Connell)

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NASA examines how gas and liquid flow in microgravity aboard International Space Station

 

Written by Mike Giannone
NASA’s Glenn Research Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationCleveland, OH – Think about underground water and gas as they filter through porous materials like soil and rock beds. On Earth, gravity forces water and gas to separate as they flow through the ground, cleaning the water and storing it in underground pools. Gravity’s role is significant in the process, both in nature with ground water and in chemical processes such as water reclamation reactors.

How this filtering works on Earth is well understood, even when the flow consists of different fluids. The process is still a mystery in microgravity.

The Packed Bed Reactor Experiment shown inside the Materials Science Glovebox work volume. (NASA)

The Packed Bed Reactor Experiment shown inside the Materials Science Glovebox work volume. (NASA)

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NASA research equipment to be delivered to International Space Station by Cygnus spacecraft

 

Written by Andrea Dunn
International Space Station Program Science Office
NASA’s Johnson Space Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHouston, TX – NASA’s commercial partner Orbital ATK plans to launch its Cygnus spacecraft into orbit December 3rd, atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket for its fourth contracted resupply mission.

The flight, known as CRS-4, will deliver samples and equipment to the International Space Station for research investigations that will occur during current and future expeditions in the many science disciplines aboard the orbiting multi-disciplinary laboratory.

This delivery will support significant research being conducted off the Earth to benefit the Earth, including investigations in advanced and automated data collection and in the behavior of gases, liquids and burning textiles in microgravity.

Close-up view of the approach to the International Space Station of the first Cygnus commercial cargo spacecraft built by Orbital ATK with the Earth in the background. (NASA)

Close-up view of the approach to the International Space Station of the first Cygnus commercial cargo spacecraft built by Orbital ATK with the Earth in the background. (NASA)

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