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Topic: International Space Station

NASA gets ready Total Solar Eclipse on August 21st

 

Written by Karen Fox
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – For the first time in 99 years, a total solar eclipse will occur across the entire continental United States, and NASA is preparing to share this experience of a lifetime on August 21st, 2017.

Viewers around the world will be provided a wealth of images captured before, during, and after the eclipse by 11 spacecraft, at least three NASA aircraft, more than 50 high-altitude balloons, and the astronauts aboard the International Space Station – each offering a unique vantage point for the celestial event.

This image of the moon crossing in front of the sun was captured on Jan. 30, 2014, by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory observing an eclipse from its vantage point in space. (NASA)

This image of the moon crossing in front of the sun was captured on Jan. 30, 2014, by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory observing an eclipse from its vantage point in space. (NASA)

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NASA video shows Earth’s Light Show

 

NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA has released video from the International Space Station of Earth’s Light Show in Space.

Brilliant fireworks shows on July 4th will have millions looking up, while light shows like these always have astronauts gazing back down.

Time-lapse imagery captured on June 25th, 2017, by Expedition 52.

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NASA monitors for Bacteria and Microorganisms on International Space Station

 

Written by Andrew Good
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Wherever you find people, you also find bacteria and other microorganisms. The International Space Station is no exception.

That generally is not a problem. For one thing, the space station is kept cleaner than many environments on Earth. Routine cleaning activities are included on astronaut task schedules.

Cargo sent to the station, and the vehicles that carry it, undergo a rigorous cleaning process and monitoring for microorganisms before launch. Crew members assigned to the space station spend 10 days in pre-flight quarantine.

The International Space Station, as seen from space shuttle Atlantis in 2011. (NASA)

The International Space Station, as seen from space shuttle Atlantis in 2011. (NASA)

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NASA reports International Space Station’s microgravity environment used to Help Fight Cancer

 

Written by Jenny Howard
International Space Station Program Science Office
NASA’s Johnson Space Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHouston, TX – On Earth, research into antibody-drug conjugates to treat cancer has been around a while. The research presents a problem, though, because Earth-based laboratories aren’t able to mimic the shape of the cancer cell within the body, which can sometimes produce incorrect findings.

The International Space Station’s unique microgravity environment allows scientists to approach the research from a new, 3-D angle.

International Space Station (ISS). (NASA)

International Space Station (ISS). (NASA)

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NASA reports Short Spacewalk Complete After Successful Installation Work

 

NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Expedition 51 Commander Peggy Whitson and Flight Engineer Jack Fischer of NASA concluded their spacewalk at the International Space Station at 9:06pm CDT. During the spacewalk, which lasted two hours and 46 minutes, the two astronauts successfully replaced a computer relay box, and installed a pair of antennas on station to enhance wireless communication for future spacewalks.

Spacewalkers have now spent a total of 1,250 hours and 41 minutes working outside the station during 201 spacewalks in support of assembly and maintenance of the orbiting laboratory.

Astronaut Jack Fischer waves while attached to the Destiny laboratory during a spacewalk to replace a failed data relay box and install a pair wireless antennas. (NASA)

Astronaut Jack Fischer waves while attached to the Destiny laboratory during a spacewalk to replace a failed data relay box and install a pair wireless antennas. (NASA)

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International Space Station Managers Give Go for Tuesday Spacewalk

 

NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – International Space Station Program managers have given the green light for a contingency spacewalk on Tuesday by two Expedition 51 crew members to change out a multiplexer-demultiplexer (MDM) data relay box on the S0 truss that failed on Saturday morning.

The cause of the MDM failure is not known. After a review of spacewalk preparations and crew readiness throughout the day Sunday, the decision was made to press ahead with the spacewalk on Tuesday. It will be conducted by Expedition 51 Commander Peggy Whitson and Flight Engineer Jack Fischer of NASA.

This picture of the International Space Station was photographed from the space shuttle Atlantis as the orbiting complex and the shuttle performed their relative separation in the early hours of July 19th, 2011. (NASA)

This picture of the International Space Station was photographed from the space shuttle Atlantis as the orbiting complex and the shuttle performed their relative separation in the early hours of July 19th, 2011. (NASA)

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NASA begins planning for Orion Spacecraft manned mission

 

NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – In February, NASA began an effort looking at the feasibility of putting crew aboard the first integrated flight of the Space Launch System rocket and Orion spacecraft — Exploration Mission-1, or EM-1. After weighing the data and assessing all implications, the agency will continue pursuing the original plan for the first launch, as a rigorous flight test of the integrated systems without crew. 

However, engineers will apply insights gained from the effort to the first flight test and the integrated systems to strengthen the long-term push to extend human presence deeper into the solar system.

NASA studies feasibility of putting crew aboard the first integrated flight of the Orion spacecraft. (NASA)

NASA studies feasibility of putting crew aboard the first integrated flight of the Orion spacecraft. (NASA)

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NASA looks for ideas for a Manufacturing Laboratory in Space

 

NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA is seeking proposals for development of a first-generation, in-space, multi-material fabrication laboratory, or FabLab, for space missions. The FabLab solicitation is issued as Appendix B of the Next Space Technologies for Exploration Partnerships (NextSTEP-2) Broad Agency Announcement. 

The FabLab development path will be implemented in three phases with the objective of the final phase to demonstrate a commercially developed FabLab on the International Space Station. This solicitation seeks responses only to Phase A, in which private industry partners will produce ground-based prototypes with a measurable ability to mature into flight demonstrations on the space station within three years.  

International Space Station astronaut Barry “Butch” Wilmore holds a science sample container that took two hours to make in December 2014. The container was the first object to be printed with two parts: a lid and a container. (NASA)

International Space Station astronaut Barry “Butch” Wilmore holds a science sample container that took two hours to make in December 2014. The container was the first object to be printed with two parts: a lid and a container. (NASA)

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NASA cargo of Science, Technology Samples Returns to Earth from International Space Station

 

Written by Dan Huot
NASA’s Johnson Space Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHouston, TX – SpaceX’s Dragon cargo spacecraft splashed down in the Pacific Ocean Sunday, March 19th, with more than 5,400 pounds of NASA cargo, and science and technology demonstration samples from the International Space Station.

Everything from stem cells that could help us understand how human cancers start and spread after being exposed to near zero-gravity, to equipment that is paving the way toward servicing and refueling satellites while they’re in orbit will be on board.

SpaceX's Dragon cargo spacecraft returned to Earth from the International Space Station loaded with science and technology samples. (NASA)

SpaceX’s Dragon cargo spacecraft returned to Earth from the International Space Station loaded with science and technology samples. (NASA)

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NASA to use Super Low Temperatures to slow Atoms for observation on International Space Station

 

Written by Andrew Good
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – This summer, an ice chest-sized box will fly to the International Space Station, where it will create the coolest spot in the universe.

Inside that box, lasers, a vacuum chamber and an electromagnetic “knife” will be used to cancel out the energy of gas particles, slowing them until they’re almost motionless. This suite of instruments is called the Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL), and was developed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. CAL is in the final stages of assembly at JPL, ahead of a ride to space this August on SpaceX CRS-12.

Its instruments are designed to freeze gas atoms to a mere billionth of a degree above absolute zero. That’s more than 100 million times colder than the depths of space.

Artist's concept of an atom chip for use by NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) aboard the International Space Station. CAL will use lasers to cool atoms to ultracold temperatures. (NASA)

Artist’s concept of an atom chip for use by NASA’s Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) aboard the International Space Station. CAL will use lasers to cool atoms to ultracold temperatures. (NASA)

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