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Topic: Ischemic Heart Disease

American Heart Association study shows Veterans with depression and/or PTSD more likely to seek cardiac rehab

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, veterans who have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and/or depression were more likely to use cardiac rehabilitation services after an episode of ischemic heart disease than those who didn’t have PTSD or depression.

A large study offers new evidence that mental health disorders may not be a barrier to cardiac rehabilitation. (American Heart Association)

A large study offers new evidence that mental health disorders may not be a barrier to cardiac rehabilitation. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest third leading cause of Disease-Related Health Loss

 

Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was the third leading cause of “health loss due to disease” in the United States behind ischemic heart disease and low back/neck pain in 2016, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

This groundbreaking study is the first to estimate disability-adjusted life years (DALY) – which measures the sum of years of life lost prematurely and years lived with disability due to a disease – among those who experienced non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the United States.

Wall mounted AED with emergency phone. (American Heart Association)

Wall mounted AED with emergency phone. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says High Pain Tolerance may mask Heart Attack Symptoms

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Heart attacks may go unrecognized among individuals with high pain tolerance, putting them at an increased risk for poor recoveries, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

A heart attack does not always have obvious symptoms, such as pain in your chest, shortness of breath and cold sweats.

This is the cold pressor test that measured pain tolerance as participants placed their hand in ice-cold water at 3 degrees Celsius (about 37 degrees Fahrenheit) for as long as possible, up to two minutes. From Researcher Andrea Ohrn, M.D., study lead author and Ph.D. Fellow at University of Tromsø in Norway. (Stina Grønbech)

This is the cold pressor test that measured pain tolerance as participants placed their hand in ice-cold water at 3 degrees Celsius (about 37 degrees Fahrenheit) for as long as possible, up to two minutes. From Researcher Andrea Ohrn, M.D., study lead author and Ph.D. Fellow at University of Tromsø in Norway. (Stina Grønbech)

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American Heart Association says Air pollution from Wildfires may ignite Heart Hazards

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Air pollution from wildfires may increase risk for cardiac arrests, and other acute heart problems, according to new research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“While breathing wildfire smoke is linked to respiratory problems such as asthma, evidence of an association between wildfire smoke exposure and heart problems has been inconsistent,” said Anjali Haikerwal, B.Sc., M.B.B.S., M.P.H., study author and a doctoral candidate at the School of Public Health & Preventive Medicine at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Gender-specific research improves accuracy of Heart Disease Diagnosis in Women

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Diagnosing coronary heart disease in women has become more accurate through gender-specific research that clarifies the role of both obstructive and non-obstructive coronary artery disease as contributors to ischemic heart disease in women, according to a new statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

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American Heart Association says costs to treat Heart Failure expected to more than double by 2030

 

Strategies to prevent and treat heart failure are needed to curb the rise in the incidence of heart failure

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX –  By 2030, you — and every U.S. taxpayer — could be paying $244 a year to care for heart failure patients, according to an American Heart Association policy statement.

The statement, published online in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Heart Failure, predicts the number of people with heart failure could climb 46 percent from 5 million in 2012 to 8 million in 2030. Direct and indirect costs to treat heart failure could more than double from $31 billion in 2012 to $70 billion in 2030.

Infographic - Heidenrich-Impact of Heart Failure  (Copyright American Heart Association)

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Heart damage improves, reverses after stem cell injections in a preliminary human trial

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Researchers have shown for the first time that stem cells injected into enlarged hearts reduced heart size, reduced scar tissue and improved function to injured heart areas, according to a small trial published in Circulation Research: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Researchers said that while this research is in the early stages, the findings are promising for the more than five million Americans who have enlarged hearts due to damage sustained from heart attacks. These patients can suffer premature death, have major disability and experience frequent hospitalizations. «Read the rest of this article»

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