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Topic: Japan

New liaison to help Austin Peay State University connect with Tennessee’s Japanese-owned companies

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Earlier this year, Yoshio Koyama, a retired businessman from Japan, set up his new office in Austin Peay State University’s Harned Hall. During the semester, he’s taught a few language and culture classes, but Koyama isn’t a college professor.

Retired businessman Yoshio Koyama is a liaison provided by The Japan Foundation to help forge relationships between APSU and Japanese businesses.

Retired businessman Yoshio Koyama is a liaison provided by The Japan Foundation to help forge relationships between APSU and Japanese businesses.

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NASA Scientists lead International Team in Global Asteroid Tracking Test

 

Written by Dwayne Brown / Laurie Cantillo
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – An international team of astronomers led by NASA scientists successfully completed the first global exercise using a real asteroid to test global response capabilities.

Planning for the so-called “TC4 Observation Campaign” started in April, under the sponsorship of NASA’s Planetary Defense Coordination Office. The exercise commenced in earnest in late July, when the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope recovered the asteroid. The finale was a close approach to Earth in mid-October.

2012 TC4's heliocentric orbit has changed due to the 2012 and 2017 close encounters with Earth. The cyan color shows the trajectory before the 2012 flyby, the magenta shows the trajectory after the 2012 flyby, and yellow shows the trajectory after the 2017 flyby. The orbital changes were primarily in semi-major axis and eccentricity, although there were also slight changes in the inclination. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

2012 TC4’s heliocentric orbit has changed due to the 2012 and 2017 close encounters with Earth. The cyan color shows the trajectory before the 2012 flyby, the magenta shows the trajectory after the 2012 flyby, and yellow shows the trajectory after the 2017 flyby. The orbital changes were primarily in semi-major axis and eccentricity, although there were also slight changes in the inclination. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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American Heart Association says Fluctuations in home-monitored Blood Pressure may raise Dementia risk

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Whether or not you have high blood pressure, your risk of dementia may be higher if your pressure varies a lot from day to day, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Home monitoring of blood pressure may be useful to assess the future risk of dementia,” said lead study author Tomoyuki Ohara, M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor of neuropsychiatry at the Graduate School of Medical Sciences at Kyushu University in Fukuoka City, Japan.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

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NASA reports Gamma-ray Telescopes discover concentration of Energy in Center of Milky Way

 

Written by Francis Reddy
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – A combined analysis of data from NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.), a ground-based observatory in Namibia, suggests the center of our Milky Way contains a “trap” that concentrates some of the highest-energy cosmic rays, among the fastest particles in the galaxy.

“Our results suggest that most of the cosmic rays populating the innermost region of our galaxy, and especially the most energetic ones, are produced in active regions beyond the galactic center and later slowed there through interactions with gas clouds,” said lead author Daniele Gaggero at the University of Amsterdam. “Those interactions produce much of the gamma-ray emission observed by Fermi and H.E.S.S.”  

An illustration of NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope orbiting Earth. ( NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Conceptual Image Lab)

An illustration of NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope orbiting Earth. ( NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center Conceptual Image Lab)

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Austin Peay State University basketball alumnus Assane Diop signs deal with Japanese Squad

 

APSU Sports Information

APSU Men's Basketball Clarksville, TN – An Austin Peay State University men’s basketball alumnus and member of the 2016 Ohio Valley Conference Tournament championship team, Assane Diop will continue his basketball career in familiar territory.

Austin Peay alumnus Assane Diop continues career with Gifu Seiryu Heroes of the Challenge Summer League. (APSU Sports Information)

Austin Peay alumnus Assane Diop continues career with Gifu Seiryu Heroes of the Challenge Summer League. (APSU Sports Information)

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Can unemployment increase stroke risk?

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Unemployment appears to increase the risk of having a stroke in middle-age Japanese men and women, and may have similar implications in the U.S, according to new research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

Unlike in the United States, in Japan, workers are part of a “life-term employment system” in which male employees devote themselves to a stable job. “If they lose that job, they are likely to be reemployed in unsatisfactory, lower positions,” said Ehab. S. Eshak, M.D., MSc., Ph.D., lead study author and visiting associate professor at Osaka University’s medical school in Japan.

While the Japanese work culture is different from the U.S. culture, researchers say the implication is that job security could help reduce stroke risk. (American Heart Association)

While the Japanese work culture is different from the U.S. culture, researchers say the implication is that job security could help reduce stroke risk. (American Heart Association)

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Fort Campbell’s Barsanti Elementary School celebrates culture, diversity with fashion show, food on International Day

 

Written by Mari-Alice Jasper
Fort Campbell Public Affairs Office

Fort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne DivisionFort Campbell, KY – Students dressed in kilts, Hanboks, and embroidered dresses strutted across the stage during the Barsanti Elementary School fashion show March, 24th, 2017, as part of International Day.

This is the fourth year the school has celebrated International Day. This year, all of the students watched a fashion show, sampled exotic foods and visited exhibits about different countries.

Before music began for the fashion show, Xavier Mendoza, third grade, and his sister, Lily, first grade, anxiously stood on the side of the stage, dressed in spotless white traditional Nicaraguan attire.

A trio of Panamanian dancers, Elisabeth Adamski, Shanida Hatcher and Vicky Shuler, performed a couple of traditional dances for the students at Barsanti Elementary School March 24, 2017, during their International Day celebration. (Mari-Alice Jasper, Fort Campbell Public Affairs Office)

A trio of Panamanian dancers, Elisabeth Adamski, Shanida Hatcher and Vicky Shuler, performed a couple of traditional dances for the students at Barsanti Elementary School March 24, 2017, during their International Day celebration. (Mari-Alice Jasper, Fort Campbell Public Affairs Office)

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NASA, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency partner to increase research abilities on International Space Station

 

NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – A new program for research cooperation on the International Space Station will enable JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) and NASA to encourage researchers and entities from both countries to mutually utilize experiment hardware between the U.S. and Japanese Experiment Module (JEM, or Kibo, which means “Hope” in Japanese).

The Japan-U.S. Open Platform Partnership Program was announced by the governments of the U.S. and Japan in December 2015, and will run through at least 2024.

The Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), includes an external platform for payloads, an airlock and a robotic arm for deploying payloads. The module is called “Kibo,” which means “hope” in Japanese. (NASA)

The Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), includes an external platform for payloads, an airlock and a robotic arm for deploying payloads. The module is called “Kibo,” which means “hope” in Japanese. (NASA)

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NASA’s WISE Explorer and Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope discover infrared/gamma ray connection to Blazars

 

Written by Elizabeth Landau
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Astronomers studying distant galaxies powered by monster black holes have uncovered an unexpected link between two very different wavelengths of the light they emit, the mid-infrared and gamma rays.

The discovery, which was accomplished by comparing data from NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has enabled the researchers to uncover dozens of new blazar candidates.

Black-hole-powered galaxies called blazars are the most common sources detected by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. (M. Weiss/CfA)

Black-hole-powered galaxies called blazars are the most common sources detected by NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. (M. Weiss/CfA)

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NASA’s Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope looks for Dark Matter

 

Written by Francis Reddy
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – Dark matter, the mysterious substance that constitutes most of the material universe, remains as elusive as ever. Although experiments on the ground and in space have yet to find a trace of dark matter, the results are helping scientists rule out some of the many theoretical possibilities.

Three studies published earlier this year, using six or more years of data from NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, have broadened the mission’s dark matter hunt using some novel approaches.

The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), at center, is the second-largest satellite galaxy orbiting our own. This image superimposes a photograph of the SMC with one half of a model of its dark matter (right of center). Lighter colors indicate greater density and show a strong concentration toward the galaxy's center. Ninety-five percent of the dark matter is contained within a circle tracing the outer edge of the model shown. (Dark matter, R. Caputo et al. 2016; background, Axel Mellinger, Central Michigan University)

The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), at center, is the second-largest satellite galaxy orbiting our own. This image superimposes a photograph of the SMC with one half of a model of its dark matter (right of center). Lighter colors indicate greater density and show a strong concentration toward the galaxy’s center. Ninety-five percent of the dark matter is contained within a circle tracing the outer edge of the model shown. (Dark matter, R. Caputo et al. 2016; background, Axel Mellinger, Central Michigan University)

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