Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Ken Burns

Clarksville Civil War Roundtable’s next meeting is November 14th, 2012

 

The 104th meeting

Clarksville Civil War RoundtableClarksville, TN – The next meeting of the Clarksville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Wednesday, November 14th, 2012 at the Bone & Joint Center, 980 Professional Park Drive, right across the street from Gateway Hospital. This is just off Dunlop Lane and Holiday Drive and only a few minutes east of Governor’s Square mall. The meeting begins at 7:00pm and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

This is a special meeting night one week earlier than normal due to the Thanksgiving holiday the following week.

The meetings topic is “Sam Watkins and his Memoir, Co. AYTCH, 1ST Tennessee Infantry” «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Events | No Comments
 

Legendary Civil War historian Edwin Bearss to appear at the Clarksville Civil War Roundtable July 18th

 

The 100th Meeting will be held at the Customs House Museum and Cultural Center

Clarksville Civil War RoundtableClarksville, TN – Legendary Civil War historian, Edwin Bearss, will speak to the Clarksville Civil War Roundtable on Wednesday, July 18th, 2012 at 7:00pm at the Customs House Museum and Cultural Center in Clarksville, Tennessee.

The Customs House Museum is located at 200 South Second Street in downtown Clarksville, Tennessee. The program will take place in the museum’s auditorium. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Events | No Comments
 

“The Civil War” premieres downtown at the Roxy Regional Theatre Tonight

 

Roxy Regional TheatreClarksville, TN - Beginning tonight, April 22nd, at 8:00pm, the Roxy Regional Theatre marks the Sesquicentennial with “The Civil War”, a musical tribute covering the enormous emotional landscape of the most difficult test our nation has ever endured.

Reminiscent of Ken Burns’ acclaimed documentary, “The Civil War” puts a human face on the greatest tragedy of American history and passionately asks us to consider our beliefs about freedom, honor and faith. This thrilling, gut-wrenching and awe-inspiring musical draws on letters, diaries, firsthand accounts and the words of Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass and Walt Whitman.

"The Civil War" plays through May 21st at the Roxy Regional Theatre in Clarksville TN.

"The Civil War" plays through May 21st at the Roxy Regional Theatre in Clarksville TN.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Events | No Comments
 


Celebrate the Sesquicentennial with the Musical “The Civil War” at the Roxy Regional Theatre

 

Roxy Regional TheatreClarksville, TN - Beginning Friday, April 22nd, at 8:00pm, the Roxy Regional Theatre marks the Sesquicentennial with “The Civil War”, a musical tribute covering the enormous emotional landscape of the most difficult test our nation has ever endured.
 
Reminiscent of Ken Burns’ acclaimed documentary, “The Civil War” puts a human face on the greatest tragedy of American history and passionately asks us to consider our beliefs about freedom, honor and faith.  This thrilling, gut-wrenching and awe-inspiring musical draws on letters, diaries, firsthand accounts and the words of Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass and Walt Whitman.

The cast of "The Civil War" performs at the Rivers & Spires Festival.

The cast of "The Civil War" performs at the Rivers & Spires Festival.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Events | No Comments
 

Maryville College Students Visit APSU to Learn About the Civil War

 

Austin Peay State UniversityClarksville, TN – On a cold afternoon earlier this month, a van drove through the melting snow in Clarksville and stopped at Austin Peay State University. A group of Maryville College students, bundled in jackets, quickly got out and went into the Morgan University Center. They’d spent much of the morning outside at Fort Donelson, and they were looking forward to a few hours in the warm indoors, learning about one of this city’s famous historical figures – Nannie Haskins Williams.

“Nannie is an important figure because she started keeping a diary when she was 16 years old in Clarksville, a year after Fort Donelson fell,” Dr. Minoa Uffelman, associate professor of history at APSU, said. “She kept it through the Civil War and after.” «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Education | No Comments
 

Kindness, even well-intentioned, can hurt

 

co-hand_book.gifFor some reason, I am still thinking about kindness; the result is this follow-up to last week’s column Kindness: A choice from the heart.

Practicing kindness requires an act of will and can be somewhat stressful to us as we face life realistically. We are encouraged by a spiritual leader named Paul to “be kind to one another,” but that often seems easier said than done. But Paul the Apostle often challenged us to do the uncomfortable and the difficult. It is legitimate to ask ourselves and to consult friends as to how far we go in practicing this trait after someone wrongs us.

Is kindness the first thought when we are betrayed? If we are honest the answer is NO. Recently I negotiated a contract for work done repairing and upgrading our deck. In discussing the job description and price, we came to an agreement both written and verbal. We paid a percentage of the cost up front to cover material for the job. It is now nearly two months since we made this agreement and the work has not even been started. My phone calls are not being returned. No excuse is being offered by the young man, nor has any effort been made to return the significant deposit.

As a person dedicated to being kind, and believing in the gospel of a second chance, what are my options? I am on the verge of getting an attorney and turning the situation over to the legal process. What is the “kind” course of action? Hey, where is the Apostle Paul and his wisdom when I need it? To be honest, I don’t have any kind feelings toward anyone who welshes on a deal. Even after this is settled in court, my confidence and trust in this person is shattered and broken. He will not be permitted on my property again. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Opinion | 1 Comment »
 

Selected Chaff: Wartime words from columnist Al McIntosh

 

To further appreciate Ken Burns’ The War as the second half of this PBS series unfolds, I recommend the reading of Selected Chaff: the Wartime Columns of Al McIntosh 1941-1945.

McIntosh’s work was a primary and powerful source for Ken Burns’ research into how The War affected the residents and soldiers of Laverne, Minnesota. Quickly reading Selected Chaff will provide profound insight as you view The War, or in the aftermath of the series.

Selected Chaff resurrects the words of a true journalistic legend, a tireless patriot whose chosen weapons were his typewriter, his uncanny ability to transport people with his words, and his unflinching love of community and country. McIntosh’s columns speak to the ebb and flow of one rural county during the most terrible war the world had ever seen.

“In some ways Al McIntosh might be the single greatest archival discovery that we have ever made.

“This man, who had the opportunity to work at other big city newspapers and turned them down — Al McIntosh, a native of North Dakota who found himself in southwestern Minnesota in this tiny town of three thousand folks, writing for the Rock County Star and the Rock County Star Herald on a front page column — just got it.”

– Ken Burns, filmmaker «Read the rest of this article»

 


The War

 

Do yourself a big favor: watch Ken Burns’ newest documentary, The War.

vco-ken-burn-the-war.jpgIn it, Burns captures the American experience of WWII in the words of those who actually fought in the war, or who experienced it on the home front. Be forewarned, it intense and, at times, hard to view.

I came away from the first episode with a feeling of pride and sadness. Pride in what we as a nation were back then; in the men and women who sacrificed, fought, and died to preserve freedom in the world. In their dedication and steadfastness in the face of what seemed then like insurmountable odds. Sadness at how far we have come since then.

The overwhelming sense conveyed by the men and women who recounted their experiences in that great conflict was that of being in it together, of shared sacrifice. Not once during the first episode did I hear anyone complain of how hard it was, what an imposition it was on them to have their world turned upside down and, often, to be thrust into what seemed as close to hell on earth as you can come. Some of the things they recounted were horrible, but never did I detect a hint of self-pity.

Our soldiers today are every bit as brave as those who served in WWII. They face danger daily and do not shirk their duty. But they are being let down by those at home. The sacrifice is not shared: rather than urging sacrifice, the president tells us to go shopping. We are told that this is the most important conflict of our time, but our leaders seem intent on waging war on the cheap, sending in too few troops to do the job right, then not supplying them with enough of the right equipment. «Read the rest of this article»

 

Ken Burns’ “The War” comes to PBS

 

“The Second World war brought out the worst as well as the best in a generation, and I think it may also have reflected the last time the United States of America was truly united in one single purpose.” — Ken Burns

vco-ken-burn-the-war.jpgThe War, a Ken Burns film on World War II, will debut as a seven episode series on PBS, including Nashville Public Television (NPT), on September 23-26 and September 30 through October 2 at 7 p.m. In Clarksville, NPT is seen on Channel 8.

A few years ago, Ken Burns riveted us with his production of The Civil War, a series that electrified , entertained, educated, and aroused our emotions. This new series promises to follow Burn’s groundbreaking tradition and style.

According to information posted by PBS on this series, The War explores “the most intimate human dimensions of the greatest cataclysm in history — a worldwide catastrophe that touched the lives of every family on every street in America.” «Read the rest of this article»

 



Personal Controls

Archives