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Topic: Measles

Senators Marsha Blackburn, Tammy Duckworth, Lamar Alexander Resolution Recognizing Importance of Vaccines Passes Senate

 

Senator Marsha Blackburn 

Tennessee

U.S. SenateWashington, D.C. – Senators Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.), Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.), and Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) introduced the bipartisan Vaccines Save Lives Resolution, recognizing the importance of vaccines and immunizations in the United States.

The resolution, which passed the Senate this week, sends a message of unequivocal Congressional support for vaccines and urges parents, in consultation with their health care providers, to follow scientific evidence and the consensus of medical experts in favor of timely vaccinations for the well-being of their children and surrounding communities.

Senator Marsha Blackburn.

Senator Marsha Blackburn.

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Tennessee Department of Health says Protect Yourself, Your Family Against Measles

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – The Tennessee Department of Health urges parents and other caregivers to make sure all children are vaccinated against measles.

While measles was declared eradicated in the U.S. in 2000 thanks to widespread vaccination, outbreaks have occurred in recent years in pockets of unvaccinated people in communities across the country.

U.S. Outbreaks Remind of Importance of Vaccination.

U.S. Outbreaks Remind of Importance of Vaccination.

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Tennessee Department of Health says Vaccines are Not Just for Children

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Preventing an illness is always better than trying to treat it once it occurs. That’s why doctors with the Tennessee Department of Health encourage people of all ages to talk with their healthcare providers about the immunizations needed for lifelong protection.

“Vaccines aren’t just for kids. They provide protection against many potentially serious and preventable illnesses that can strike an individual, a family or a community without warning,” said TDH Commissioner John Dreyzehner, MD, MPH.

Immunizations Prevent Serious Illnesses throughout Life.

Immunizations Prevent Serious Illnesses throughout Life.

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Tennessee Department of Health says Back-To-School plans should include required Vaccinations

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – To prevent the spread of diseases and to keep our kids of all ages and their classmates safe, healthy and in school learning, all students in Tennessee, from kindergarten to college, must have proof of immunizations before they can start school.

State leaders of health and education say it’s best to get those important vaccines now to avoid longer wait times later and to ensure a smooth beginning to the 2017 school year.

Immunizations Save Teaching Time, Reduce Misery and Save Lives.

Immunizations Save Teaching Time, Reduce Misery and Save Lives.

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Tennessee Department of Health says Don’t Let Your Child Miss Out

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – In just a few days, thousands of students from across Tennessee will take their seats in classrooms to begin a new academic year filled with wonderful experiences and learning opportunities.

As these youngsters start opening books and mingling with friends, some will miss out on the important first few days of school, unable to attend because they aren’t properly immunized to prevent the spread of dangerous, infectious diseases.

Kindergarteners and other children enrolling in a Tennessee school for the first time must provide schools with a complete Official Tennessee Immunization Certificate before classes begin.

Kindergarteners and other children enrolling in a Tennessee school for the first time must provide schools with a complete Official Tennessee Immunization Certificate before classes begin.

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Tennessee Department of Health says Help Keep Our Children Healthy, Get School Immunizations Now

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Another school year will soon begin for many students in Tennessee and now is the time to make sure they receive the required immunizations for school attendance.

‘’Vaccines are critical protection for our own children and help keep other kids around them safe from many diseases,’’ said TDH Commissioner John Dreyzehner, MD, MPH. “The measles outbreak we just emerged from in Memphis should serve as a vivid wake-up call and remind us how lucky we are to have vaccines that protect us. Please make sure you and yours have the vaccines you need.”

Kindergarteners and other children enrolling in a Tennessee school for the first time must provide schools with a complete Official Tennessee Immunization Certificate before classes begin.

Kindergarteners and other children enrolling in a Tennessee school for the first time must provide schools with a complete Official Tennessee Immunization Certificate before classes begin.

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Tennessee Department of Health Work continues to Prevent the Spread of Measles

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – The Shelby County Health Department, supported by staff members from the Tennessee Department of Health, continued work throughout the weekend to prevent the spread of measles.

SCHD and TDH Friday reported two cases of the disease in Shelby County; as of today the case count for those meeting the case definition for measles has increased to six.  All are in Shelby County.

“As a highly contagious and sometimes serious disease, measles infects approximately 20 million worldwide each year,” said TDH Commissioner John Dreyzehner, MD, MPH.

Measles starts with fever, runny nose, cough, red eyes, and sore throat. It’s followed by a rash that spreads over the body. Measles virus is highly contagious virus and spreads through the air through coughing and sneezing. Make sure you and your child are protected with measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. (CDC)

Measles starts with fever, runny nose, cough, red eyes, and sore throat. It’s followed by a rash that spreads over the body. Measles virus is highly contagious virus and spreads through the air through coughing and sneezing. Make sure you and your child are protected with measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. (CDC)

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Fort Campbell’s Blanchfield Army Community Hospital launches pandemic exercise to meet immunization requirements

 

Blanchfield Army Hospital - BACH - Fort Campbell KYFort Campbell, KY – The Army recently changed the immunization documentation process, and Fort Campbell found a unique way to meet the requirements efficiently and quickly last week.

In collaboration with Blanchfield Army Community Hospital’s Department of Preventive Medicine, the 101st Airborne Division and Fort Campbell tenant units participated in a post-wide pandemic exercise.

Spec. Heather Rogers, medic from 1-33 Cavalry with the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, administers the MMR vaccine to Sgt. Kyle Allison, assigned to the Intelligent & Sustainment Co., 101st Headquarter and Headquarter Battalion, 101st Airborne Division, during a two-day post-wide Pandemic Exercise held at the Soldier Readiness Processing Center March 25 and 26. (BACH)

Spec. Heather Rogers, medic from 1-33 Cavalry with the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, administers the MMR vaccine to Sgt. Kyle Allison, assigned to the Intelligent & Sustainment Co., 101st Headquarter and Headquarter Battalion, 101st Airborne Division, during a two-day post-wide Pandemic Exercise held at the Soldier Readiness Processing Center March 25 and 26. (BACH)

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Tennessee Department of Health says Measles outbreak in California underscores importance of Immunization

 

Tennessee Department of Health - TDOHNashville, TN – Measles, a disease considered eradicated in the United States, is making headlines due to a growing outbreak linked to a California amusement park. Most of the people infected with measles in this outbreak were not vaccinated against the disease.

While Tennessee does not yet have any reported measles cases in 2015 and no cases linked to this outbreak at this time, the Tennessee Department of Health is reminding everyone of the importance of routine vaccination against measles and other illnesses.

A child receiving an immunization

A child receiving an immunization

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Tennessee Department of Health working to protect Tennesseans from emerging diseases

 

Tennessee Department of Health - TDOHNashville, TN – Protecting people from infectious diseases is a vital part of the mission of the Tennessee Department of Health, and TDH works around the clock to prepare for, respond to and protect people in the state from diseases both familiar and new to Tennessee. TDH has plans in place to respond to emerging diseases such as Ebola Virus Disease that are now spreading outside the U.S. as well as future health threats that may develop.

“‘’Are we safe? What is the risk? What should I do?’ These are some of the questions we all ask when we hear about unfamiliar and sometimes dangerous communicable diseases,” said TDH Commissioner John Dreyzehner, MD, MPH.

This graphic shows the life cycle of the ebolavirus. Bats are strongly implicated as both reservoirs and hosts for the ebolavirus. Of the five identified ebolavirus subtypes, four are capable of human-to-human transmission. Initial infections in humans result from contact with an infected bat or other wild animal. Strict isolation of infected patients is essential to reduce onward ebolavirus transmission. (CDC)

This graphic shows the life cycle of the ebolavirus. Bats are strongly implicated as both reservoirs and hosts for the ebolavirus. Of the five identified ebolavirus subtypes, four are capable of human-to-human transmission. Initial infections in humans result from contact with an infected bat or other wild animal. Strict isolation of infected patients is essential to reduce onward ebolavirus transmission. (CDC)

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