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Topic: Native American History

Dunbar Cave State Park to hold Native American History Program Saturday, June 22nd

 

Dunbar Cave seen from across Swan LakeClarksville, TN – On Saturday, June 22nd, the Dunbar Cave State Natural Area will be hold a presentation about Native American History and Artifacts of Middle Tennessee. This free program will start at 10:00am and will be over at 12:00pm.

The entrance of Dunbar Cave offered shelter to prehistoric Native Americans as far back as 10,000 years.

Arrowheads and other Native American tools to be discussed at Dunbar Cave State Park this Saturday.

Arrowheads and other Native American tools to be discussed at Dunbar Cave State Park this Saturday.

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Dunbar Cave State Park Programs for June 16th through June 22nd, 2013

 

Clarksville, TNDunbar Cave State Natural Area has been a State Park since 1973. The cave and its surrounding 110 acres have considerable scenic, natural and historical significance. The entrance offered shelter to prehistoric Native Americans as far back as 10,000 years.

Dunbar Cave State Natural Area will present many nature programs this summer. There are programs for children and adults.

Upcoming events include: Night Hike, Evening Woods Walk, Night Hike and Night Critters, Fireflies, Kids Hike, Insects and so much more!

The Dunbar Cave State Natural Area's Visitors Center

The Dunbar Cave State Natural Area’s Visitors Center

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22nd Tennessee Sandhill Crane Festival set for January 19th and 20th

 

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency - TWRANashville, TN – The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency will be among organizations set to host the 2013 Tennessee Sandhill Crane Festival to be held on January 19th-20th at the Hiwassee Refuge and in the community of Birchwood, TN. This will be the 22nd anniversary for the event which will run from 8:00am until 6:00pm each day.

The Tennessee Sandhill Crane Festival is a celebration of the thousands of sandhill cranes that migrate through or spend the winter on and around the Hiwassee Refuge in Birchwood. It is also an opportunity to focus attention on the rich wildlife heritage of the state and the Native American history of the area.

The Sandhill Crane Festival will be held January 19th-20th at the Hiwassee Refuge and in the community of Birchwood. It is the 22nd anniversary of the event.

The Sandhill Crane Festival will be held January 19th-20th at the Hiwassee Refuge and in the community of Birchwood. It is the 22nd anniversary of the event.

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21st Sandhill Crane Festival coming up on January 14th-15th

 

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency - TWRANashville, TN – The TWRA is among those organizations set to host the 2012 Tennessee Sandhill Crane Festival to be held on January 14th-15th at the Hiwassee Refuge. This is the 21st anniversary of the event.

The Tennessee Sandhill Crane Festival is a celebration of the thousands of sandhill cranes that migrate through or spend the winter on and around the Hiwassee Refuge in Birchwood as well as an opportunity to focus attention on the rich wildlife heritage of the state and the Native American history of the area.

Other sponsors for the free family event are the Tennessee Ornithological Society, and the Mapp Foundation in partnership with the Birchwood Community, the Birchwood School, the Cherokee Removal Memorial, Meigs and Rhea County Tourism. «Read the rest of this article»

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2010 Pow Wow and Fall Festival at Long Hunter State Park

 

29th Annual Festival Slated for October 15th-17th

Nashville, TN – Long Hunter State Park will host the 29th Annual Pow Wow and Fall Festival October 15th-17th, featuring Native American artists, musicians, dancers, food and storytellers. Sponsored by the Native American Indian Association of Tennessee, this time-honored gathering draws thousands of people from across the country and offers a unique opportunity to explore a variety of tribal customs and cultural experiences.  

“The 2010 Pow Wow is an incredible opportunity to educate families and students about Native American history and the importance of preserving this heritage for future generations,” said park manager Thurman Mullins. “This year’s roster of artists and performers will share their wonderful talents and provide a unique and up-close experience for park visitors.” «Read the rest of this article»

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Trail of Tears Commemorative Day to kick off 11th Annual Inter-Tribal PowWow

 

The Trail of Tears Commemorative Day will lead off the Native Cultural Circle’s annual Inter-Tribal PowWow. The Port Royal site is the only remaining uncovered segment of the original trail in Tennessee.

October 11 and 12th. Mark your calendars. The second weekend of October is just around the corner. That means the Native Cultural Circle’s Inter-Tribal PowWow is here. Every year the group hosts the annual two-day powwow as a means of educating the general public about Tennessee’s native peoples traditions, culture and customs.

Clarksville is blessed, in that the powwow site has truly historic significance, because it is staged adjacent to last remaining uncovered segment of the Trail of Tears in Tennessee. The land is included in the Port Royal State Historic Park, where the quiet beauty of the area is well suited to the occasion. «Read the rest of this article»

 

Trail of Tears Pow Wow drums connect heart and feet to Mother Earth

 

On September 6th and 7th the annual Trail of Tears Pow Wow took place in Hopkinsville, Kentucky.  This Pow Wow is on the same weekend as the Clarksville Riverfest (that’s how I remember when it is).  I went there on Sunday afternoon (9.7.08) and saw several types of competition dancing for different ages and styles.  The hot day got hotter watching the young men give it their all in their competition run off.

For the run-off they did the chicken dance.  One might think that would look funny, like the white man’s version, but it was wildly fantastic leaving the audience roaring with applause.  One could see from the dancers’ movements that a chicken, like other animals who live on this planet with us, has it’s own “dance” that we can either laugh at and feel superior to, or study and learn from with respect to that animal.  It’s a choice that my culture usually doesn’t consider.

While the drummers, singers and dancers took a break, I bought an Indian fry bread, taco style, and while eating listened to the storyteller speak and play his flute.  Then I roamed around the booths surrounding the dance arena.  I moved through the crowds of people, checking out dream catchers, jewelry, leather goods, pottery, finger puppets, flutes, CD’s, tee shirts, sage, books, toys and tea. «Read the rest of this article»

 



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