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NASA to test Space Launch System’s Largest Fuel Tank

 

Written by Tracy McMahan
NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHuntsville, AL – Major construction is complete on NASA’s largest new Space Launch System structural test stand, and engineers are now installing equipment needed to test the rocket’s biggest fuel tank.

The stand is critical for ensuring SLS’s liquid hydrogen tank can withstand the extreme forces of launch and ascent on its first flight, and later on the second flight, which will carry up to four astronauts in the Orion spacecraft on a journey around the moon, into the deep-space proving ground for the technology needed for the journey to Mars.

Robert Bobo, left, and Mike Nichols talk beneath the 221-foot-tall Test Stand 4693, the largest of two new Space Launch System test stands at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Bobo manages SLS structural strength testing, and Nichols is lead test engineer for the SLS liquid hydrogen tank, which the stand will subject to the forces it must endure during launch and flight. (NASA/MSFC/Emmett Given)

Robert Bobo, left, and Mike Nichols talk beneath the 221-foot-tall Test Stand 4693, the largest of two new Space Launch System test stands at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Bobo manages SLS structural strength testing, and Nichols is lead test engineer for the SLS liquid hydrogen tank, which the stand will subject to the forces it must endure during launch and flight. (NASA/MSFC/Emmett Given)

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NASA’s Orion Spacecraft to make leaps forward in 2017

 

NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – From the beginning of assembly work on the Orion crew module at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida to testing a range of the spacecraft systems, engineers made headway in 2016 in advance of the spacecraft’s 2018 mission beyond the moon.

A look at the important milestones that lie ahead in the next year give a glimpse into how NASA is pressing ahead to develop, build, test and fly the spacecraft that will enable human missions far into deep space.

Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians monitor the progress as a crane lowers the Orion crew module structural test article (STA) onto a test tool called the birdcage. (NASA)

Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians monitor the progress as a crane lowers the Orion crew module structural test article (STA) onto a test tool called the birdcage. (NASA)

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Clarksville-Montgomery County Arts and Heritage Development Council lifetime Achievement Awards to be held Monday, December 5th

 

Clarksville Arts and Heritage Development CouncilClarksville, TN – Two Clarksvillians will be honored this Monday, December 5th, by the Clarksville-Montgomery County Arts and Heritage Development Council for their achievement in art and in preserving our heritage.

Dr. James Diehr, professor emeritus of art at Austin Peay State University, will receive the Lifetime Achievement in Art award and Inga Filippo, APSU professor emerita of library science, will receive the Lifetime Achievement in Heritage award.

Inga Filippo to receive the Lifetime Achievement in Heritage award.

Inga Filippo to receive the Lifetime Achievement in Heritage award.

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American Heart Association says Popular Heartburn Medication may increase Ischemic Stroke Risk

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – A popular group of antacids known as proton pump inhibitors, or PPIs, used to reduce stomach acid and treat heartburn may increase the risk of ischemic stroke, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

“PPIs have been associated with unhealthy vascular function, including heart attacks, kidney disease and dementia,” said Thomas Sehested, M.D., study lead author and a researcher at the Danish Heart Foundation in Copenhagen, Denmark. “We wanted to see if PPIs also posed a risk for ischemic stroke, especially given their increasing use in the general population.”

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

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Amputation risks highest amongst Poor and Black Peripheral Artery Disease Patients according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Poverty and black race are independently predictive of greater amputation risk among patients with narrowing of the blood vessels, or peripheral artery disease (PAD), according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

PAD is a serious disease that occurs when fat, cholesterol, and other substances accumulate in blood vessels away from the heart, restricting blood flow.

Poverty and black race are independently predictive of greater amputation risk among patients with narrowing of the blood vessels, or peripheral artery disease (PAD). (American Heart Association)

Poverty and black race are independently predictive of greater amputation risk among patients with narrowing of the blood vessels, or peripheral artery disease (PAD). (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Yo-Yo Dieting Dangerous even if you’re not Overweight

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Repeatedly losing and regaining weight, known as weight cycling or yo-yo dieting, may increase the risk of death from heart disease among postmenopausal women who were of normal weight at the start of the study, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Normal weight postmenopausal women at the start of the study who lost and regained weight had: 3 and ½ times higher risk for sudden cardiac death and nearly 66% increased risk for coronary heart disease death. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reports Poor Sleep may increase risk for Irregular Heart Rhythms

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Disruptions in sleep may be raising your risks of an irregular heartbeat, known as atrial fibrillation (AF), according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Obstructive sleep apnea, sleep interrupted by pauses in breathing, is a known risk for atrial fibrillation – an irregular heartbeat that can lead to strokes, heart failure and other heart-related complications. But whether there’s a relationship between disrupted sleep and atrial fibrillation even when there’s no sleep apnea is unclear.

Poor sleep – even if you don’t have sleep apnea – may be linked to higher risks of developing an irregular heartbeat. (American Heart Association)

Poor sleep – even if you don’t have sleep apnea – may be linked to higher risks of developing an irregular heartbeat. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Bariatric Surgery may reduce Heart Failure Risk

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Bariatric surgery and other treatments that cause substantial weight loss can significantly reduce the risk of heart failure in obese patients, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Researchers compared 25,804 bariatric surgery patients in a Scandinavian obesity surgery registry to 13,701 Swedish nationwide registry patients who used an intensive structured lifestyle-modification program. Both groups had no history of heart failure before starting treatment and body mass indices greater than 30 and weighed on average 119 kilograms/262.35 pounds before treatment.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Children born by Cesarean Section may have a Greater Risk of Obesity

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Children delivered by Cesarean section may have an increased risk for obesity compared to children born vaginally, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Compared to vaginally-delivered children, Cesarean-delivered children had 40 percent greater odds of becoming overweight or obese in childhood. This association was even greater if their mother was overweight or obese, suggesting that among obese mothers vaginal delivery may help reduce the intergenerational association of obesity.

Compared with vaginally-delivered children, those born by Cesarean section had a 1.4 times greater odds of becoming overweight or obese in childhood. (American Heart Association)

Compared with vaginally-delivered children, those born by Cesarean section had a 1.4 times greater odds of becoming overweight or obese in childhood. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Sugary Drink Sales drop nearly 20 percent after multi-faceted Campaign

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – After a multi-faceted campaign that included policy changes and community education efforts, residents of one Maryland county put fewer sugary drinks in their grocery carts, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Drinks loaded with added sugars are one of the leading sources of empty calories in the diet of both children and adults, and overconsumption of sugar is associated with obesity and an increased risk of heart disease.

This is the first study to measure the effect of a community led anti-sugary drink campaign using objective retail sales measures. (American Heart Association)

This is the first study to measure the effect of a community led anti-sugary drink campaign using objective retail sales measures. (American Heart Association)

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