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Topic: NOAA

NASA Study reveals reasons for Sea Ice Changes at the Arctic, Antarctica

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Why has the sea ice cover surrounding Antarctica been increasing slightly, in sharp contrast to the drastic loss of sea ice occurring in the Arctic Ocean? A new NASA-led study finds the geology of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are responsible.

A NASA/NOAA/university team led by Son Nghiem of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, used satellite radar, sea surface temperature, land form and bathymetry (ocean depth) data to study the physical processes and properties affecting Antarctic sea ice.

Older, rougher and thicker Antarctic sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea in Oct. 2007, within the sea ice shield surrounding Antarctica. The ice in this region is approximately 33 feet (10 meters) thick. (M.J. Lewis)

Older, rougher and thicker Antarctic sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea in Oct. 2007, within the sea ice shield surrounding Antarctica. The ice in this region is approximately 33 feet (10 meters) thick. (M.J. Lewis)

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NASA Satellites to help Airlines avoid delays caused by Volcanic Ash

 

Written by Audrey Haar
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – A volcano erupting and spewing ash into the sky can cover nearby areas under a thick coating of ash and can also have consequences for aviation safety. Airline traffic changes due to a recent volcanic eruption can rack up unanticipated expenses to flight cancellations, lengthy diversions and additional fuel costs from rerouting.

Airlines are prudently cautious, because volcanic ash is especially dangerous to airplanes, as ash can melt within an operating aircraft engine, resulting in possible engine failure.

Volcano eruptions can wreak havoc on airplanes that fly through the clouds of ash and sulfur dioxide.

Volcano eruptions can wreak havoc on airplanes that fly through the clouds of ash and sulfur dioxide.

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NASA Satellite Data shows High Altitude Clouds shifting to Earth’s Poles

 

Written by Ellen Gray
NASA’s Earth Science News Team
NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Washington, D.C. – A new NASA analysis of 30-years of satellite data suggests that a previously observed trend of high altitude clouds in the mid-latitudes shifting toward the poles is caused primarily by the expansion of the tropics.

Clouds are among the most important mediators of heat reaching Earth’s surface. Where clouds are absent, darker surfaces like the ocean or vegetated land absorb heat, but where clouds occur their white tops reflect incoming sunlight away, which can cause a cooling effect on Earth’s surface.

The Hadley cells describe how air moves through the tropics on either side of the equator. They are two of six major air circulation cells on Earth. (NASA)

The Hadley cells describe how air moves through the tropics on either side of the equator. They are two of six major air circulation cells on Earth. (NASA)

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Be weather aware, have a safety plan for outdoor recreation

 

Written by Sara Goodeyon
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District

U.S. Army Corps of EngineersKansas City, MO – With the arrival of the outdoor recreation season, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District reminds outdoor enthusiasts and recreationalists to be weather aware when visiting Corps lakes and recreation areas.

The National Weather Service advises the public that the best protection from weather-related injury or death is to monitor the weather and postpone or cancel outdoor activities when inclement weather is in the forecast.

Sixty-four percent of lightning fatalities result from outdoor recreation. A large portion of these are from water activities and sports. Infographic courtesy of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District) «Read the rest of this article»

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Heavy Rainfall tonight and Strong to Severe Storms tomorrow expected for Clarskville-Montgomery County

 

National Weather ServiceNashville, TN – The National Weather Service (NWS) reports scattered to numerous showers and thunderstorms will spread across Clarksville-Montgomery County and parts of Middle Tennessee late tonight and tomorrow.

Some storms will likely produce locally heavy rainfall with rainfall totals of 1 to 3 inches expected. Some localized flash flooding could occur in some areas, especially west of I-65 as early as tomorrow morning.

This flash flood threat will persist through tomorrow evening with additional showers and thunderstorms expected.

Clarksville-Montgomery County can expect heavy rains tonight and severe storms on Thursday.

Clarksville-Montgomery County can expect heavy rains tonight and severe storms on Thursday.

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Heavy Rainfall and Strong Storms possible for Clarksville-Montgomery County, Wednesday

 

National Weather ServiceNashville, TN – The National Weather Service (NWS) reports scattered showers and thunderstorms will spread across Clarksville-Montgomery County and Middle Tennessee during the day on Wednesday, March 30th, becoming more widespread and heavy Wednesday night.

Some storms will likely produce heavy rainfall with rainfall totals of 1 to 3 inches currently expected. This rainfall may lead to flash flooding in some areas.

Heavy rain expected Wednesday for Clarksville-Montgomery County. «Read the rest of this article»

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NASA announces Jason-3 Satellite creates it’s first Global Ocean Map

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Jason-3, a new U.S.-European oceanography satellite mission with NASA participation, has produced its first complete science map of global sea surface height, capturing the current signal of the 2015-16 El Niño.

The map was generated from the first 10 days of data collected once Jason-3 reached its operational orbit of 830 miles (1,336 kilometers) last month. It shows the state of the ongoing El Niño event that began early last year. After peaking in January, the high sea levels in the eastern Pacific are now beginning to shrink.

The U.S./European Jason-3 satellite has produced its first map of sea surface height, which corresponds well to data from its predecessor, Jason-2. Higher-than-normal sea levels are red; lower-than-normal sea levels are blue. El Nino is visible as the red blob in the eastern equatorial Pacific. (NASA/JPL Ocean Surface Topography Team)

The U.S./European Jason-3 satellite has produced its first map of sea surface height, which corresponds well to data from its predecessor, Jason-2. Higher-than-normal sea levels are red; lower-than-normal sea levels are blue. El Nino is visible as the red blob in the eastern equatorial Pacific. (NASA/JPL Ocean Surface Topography Team)

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NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement Satellite studies Thunderstorms in Southeastern United States

 

Written by Hal Pierce / Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – Severe weather moved through the southern U.S. on February 2nd and 3rd, and NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellite examined the violent thunderstorms.

On February 3rd, 2016 at 1851 UTC (1:51pm ET/12:51pm CT) the GPM core observatory satellite flew over a line of storms extending from the Gulf coast of Florida through New York state. Tornadoes were spotted in Georgia and South Carolina within this area of violent weather.

On Feb. 3 at 1:51 p.m. EDT GPM found that one powerful thunderstorm in North Carolina was dropping rain at the extreme rate of 112.96 mm (4.4 inches) per hour. (NASA/JAXA/SSAI, Hal Pierce)

On Feb. 3 at 1:51 p.m. EDT GPM found that one powerful thunderstorm in North Carolina was dropping rain at the extreme rate of 112.96 mm (4.4 inches) per hour. (NASA/JAXA/SSAI, Hal Pierce)

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NASA, NOAA data shows Earth’s 2015 surface temperatures were the highest in History

 

Written by Dwayne Brown
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Earth’s 2015 surface temperatures were the warmest since modern record keeping began in 1880, according to independent analyses by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Globally-averaged temperatures in 2015 shattered the previous mark set in 2014 by 0.23 degrees Fahrenheit (0.13 Celsius). Only once before, in 1998, has the new record been greater than the old record by this much.

2015 was the warmest year since modern record-keeping began in 1880, according to a new analysis by NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies. The record-breaking year continues a long-term warming trend — 15 of the 16 warmest years on record have now occurred since 2001. (Scientific Visualization Studio/Goddard Space Flight Center)

2015 was the warmest year since modern record-keeping began in 1880, according to a new analysis by NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies. The record-breaking year continues a long-term warming trend — 15 of the 16 warmest years on record have now occurred since 2001. (Scientific Visualization Studio/Goddard Space Flight Center)

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NASA launches Jason-3 Spacecraft

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationVandenberg Air Force Base, CA – On January 17th, 2016 at 10:50am PT/12:50pm CT, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from Space Launch Complex 4 at Vandenberg Air Force Base carrying the Jason-3 spacecraft.

NASA launched Jason-3 into orbit for NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the French space agency and EUMETSAT, the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites.

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the U.S.-European Jason-3 satellite launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base Space Launch Complex 4 East on Sunday, Jan. 17, 2016. Jason-3, an international mission with NASA participation, will continue a 23-year record of monitoring global sea level rise. (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the U.S.-European Jason-3 satellite launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base Space Launch Complex 4 East on Sunday, Jan. 17, 2016. Jason-3, an international mission with NASA participation, will continue a 23-year record of monitoring global sea level rise. (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

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