Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: NOAA

NASA’s Terra Satellite takes image of Eastern United States under Arctic Freeze

 

Written by Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – NASA’s Terra satellite captured an image of the snow-covered eastern U.S. that looks like the states have been sitting in a freezer. In addition to the snow cover, Arctic and Siberian air masses have settled in over the Eastern U.S. triggering many record low temperatures in many states.

On February 19th at 16:40 UTC (11:40am EST), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured a picture of the snowy landscape.

NASA's Terra satellite captured this picture of snow across the eastern United States on Feb. 19th at 16:20 UTC (11:20am EST). (NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team)

NASA’s Terra satellite captured this picture of snow across the eastern United States on Feb. 19th at 16:20 UTC (11:20am EST). (NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

Tennessee Agencies prepare for Winter Storm, Urge Tennesseans to Avoid Unnecessary Road Travel

 

Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland SecurityNashville, TN – The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA), the Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security, and the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) urge citizens to avoid unnecessary road travel on Monday as the state prepares for a severe winter storm. Motorists who must drive on Monday are advised to check local forecasts and road conditions before travelling.

Middle Tennessee will be under a Winter Storm Warning starting at 9:00pm, CST, Sunday until 6:00am, CST, Monday. The National Weather Service is forecasting a wintry mixture of snow, sleet and freezing rain at Tennessee’s border with Alabama. Along Tennessee’s border with Kentucky, six inches to 10 inches of snow is possible.

Snow and ice on the roads.

Snow and ice on the roads.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

NASA monitors Frigid Temperatures moving across Eastern United States

 

Written by Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – Some of the coldest air of the 2014-2015 winter season was settling over the eastern two-thirds of the U.S. on February 13th, 2015. That Arctic air mass brought wind chills from below zero to the single numbers from the Midwest to the Mid-Atlantic.

Despite the cold on the surface, infrared NASA satellite imagery revealed even colder temperatures in cloud tops associated with the air mass.

NOAA’s GOES-East satellite provided a visible and infrared picture of the clouds associated with the Arctic air mass, as they stretched from the eastern Dakotas to the Mid-Atlantic region.

This false-colored infrared image from the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite at 7:29 UTC (2:29 a.m. EST) shows cloud top temperatures over New York, Vermont, and New Hampshire near 245K/-28C/-18F (greenish to blue shading). (NASA JPL, Ed Olsen)

This false-colored infrared image from the AIRS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite at 7:29 UTC (2:29 a.m. EST) shows cloud top temperatures over New York, Vermont, and New Hampshire near 245K/-28C/-18F (greenish to blue shading). (NASA JPL, Ed Olsen)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 


NASA reports NOAA to launch Deep Space Climate Observatory to measure the Sun’s Solar Wind

 

Written by Karen C. Fox
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – There’s a fascinating spot some 932,000 miles away from Earth where the gravity between the sun and Earth is perfectly balanced. This spot captures the attention of orbital engineers because a satellite can orbit this spot, called Lagrange 1 just as they can orbit a planet.

But the spot tantalizes scientists as well: Lagrange 1 lies outside Earth’s magnetic environment, a perfect place to measure the constant stream of particles from the sun, known as the solar wind, as they pass by.

In early February, the United States Air Force will launch a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellite called Deep Space Climate Observatory, or DSCOVR, into orbit around this spot.

The solar arrays on NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, are unfurled in the Building 1 high bay at the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Florida, near Kennedy Space Center. (NASA/Ben Smegelsky)

The solar arrays on NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, are unfurled in the Building 1 high bay at the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Florida, near Kennedy Space Center. (NASA/Ben Smegelsky)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory could help develop better Weather Forecasts

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – If you were trying to forecast tomorrow’s weather, you would probably look up at the sky rather than down at the ground. But if you live in the U.S. Midwest or someplace with a similar climate, one key to a better weather forecast may lie beneath your feet.

Precipitation and temperature are part of every weather forecast. Precipitation comes from clouds, clouds are formed of airborne water vapor, and vapor comes from evaporating soil moisture — so soil moisture governs precipitation.

NASA's SMAP's soil moisture measurements will help with forecasts of precipitation and temperature. (UCAR)

NASA’s SMAP’s soil moisture measurements will help with forecasts of precipitation and temperature. (UCAR)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

New NASA Study reveals ozone-depleting compound tetrachloride abundant in Earth’s Ozone Layer

 

Written by Tony Phillips
Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – High above Earth, more than 20 miles above sea level, a diaphanous layer of ozone surrounds our planet, absorbing energetic UV rays from the sun.

It is, essentially, sunscreen for planet Earth. Without the ozone layer, we would be bathed in dangerous radiation on a daily basis, with side effects ranging from cataracts to cancer.

People were understandably alarmed, then, in the 1980s when scientists noticed that man made chemicals in the atmosphere were destroying this layer.

YouTube Preview Image

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA’s QuikScat satellite to be used to calibrate it’s successor RapidScat

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – June 19th marked the 15th anniversary of the launch of NASA’s QuikScat, a satellite sent for a three-year mission in 1999 that continues collecting data. Built in less than 12 months, QuikScat has watched ocean wind patterns for 15 years and improved weather forecasting worldwide. Despite a partial instrument failure in 2009, it provides calibration data to international partners.

On this anniversary, the mission’s team is calibrating ISS-RapidScat, the successor that will maintain QuikScat’s unbroken data record. After its launch in a few months, RapidScat will watch ocean winds from the International Space Station (ISS) for a two-year mission.

Using data from NASA's QuikScat, weather forecasters were able to predict hazardous weather events over oceans 6 to 12 hours earlier than before these data were available. Orange areas show where winds are blowing the hardest and blue shows relatively light winds. (NASA)

Using data from NASA’s QuikScat, weather forecasters were able to predict hazardous weather events over oceans 6 to 12 hours earlier than before these data were available. Orange areas show where winds are blowing the hardest and blue shows relatively light winds. (NASA)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 


NASA reports Sun has entered Solar Max of it’s solar cycle

 

Written by Dr. Tony Phillips
Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Years ago, in 2008 and 2009 an eerie quiet descended on the sun. Sunspot counts dropped to historically-low levels and solar flares ceased altogether. As the longest and deepest solar minimum in a century unfolded, bored solar physicists wondered when “Solar Max” would ever return.

They can stop wondering. “It’s back,” says Dean Pesnell of the Goddard Space Flight Center. “Solar Max has arrived.”

YouTube Preview Image «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA’s Jason-2 satellite data points to possible El Niño in 2014

 

Written by Tony Phillips
Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Every ten days, the NASA/French Space Agency Jason-2 satellite maps all the world’s oceans, monitoring changes in sea surface height, a measure of heat in the upper layers of the water. Because our planet is more than 70% ocean, this information is crucial to global forecasts of weather and climate.

Lately, Jason-2 has seen something brewing in the Pacific—and it looks a lot like 1997.

YouTube Preview Image «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA reports on Intense Solar Storm that barely missed Earth

 

Written by Dr. Tony Phillips
Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Last month (April 8th-11th), scientists, government officials, emergency planners and others converged on Boulder, Colorado, for NOAA’s Space Weather Workshop—an annual gathering to discuss the perils and probabilities of solar storms.

The current solar cycle is weaker than usual, so you might expect a correspondingly low-key meeting. On the contrary, the halls and meeting rooms were abuzz with excitement about an intense solar storm that narrowly missed Earth.

YouTube Preview Image «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 


Page 1 of 712345...»

Personal Controls

Archives