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Topic: Northwestern University

APSU Athletics announces Under Armour to be official outfitter for the Governors

 

APSU Sports Information

Austin Peay State University Sports - APSU - Governors - Lady GovsClarksville, TN – Austin Peay State University and Under Armour, Inc. (NYSE: UA) announced a new partnership agreement, Wednesday, September 28th, 2017. The Baltimore-based global leader in performance footwear, apparel and equipment will become the official outfitter of Governors beginning Friday.

As part of the multi-year agreement, Under Armour will provide on-field and training gear for the department’s 16 NCAA Division I intercollegiate teams. Additionally, Under Armour will outfit members of the athletic department including coaches and staff.

Under Armor to become the official outfitter of the Austin Peay Governors starting Friday, September 29th. (APSU Sports Information)

Under Armor to become the official outfitter of the Austin Peay Governors starting Friday, September 29th. (APSU Sports Information)

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American Heart Association says Golden Years are longer and healthier for those with Good Heart Health in Middle Age

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People with no major heart disease risk factors in middle age live longer and stay healthy far longer than others, according to a 40-year study reported in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Good cardiovascular health in middle age delays the onset of many types of disease so that people live longer and spend a much smaller proportion of their lives with chronic illness,” said Norrina Allen, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

A Healthy Heart in Middle Age Could Add Almost Four Years to Your Life After Age 65 and Save You $18,000 in Medicare Care Costs. Graphic shows these benefits for middle aged adults who don't smoke or have diabetes, maintain a normal weight, have good blood pressure and good cholesterol. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reports Overweight and obese people are burdened by cardiovascular disease at younger ages

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPortland, OR – People who are overweight or obese may live as long as or less than those of healthy weight, but they experience cardiovascular disease at an earlier age and live longer burdened by the disease, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention / Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2017 Scientific Sessions.

Overweight and obese people have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease in their lifetime. (American Heart Association)

Overweight and obese people have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease in their lifetime. (American Heart Association)

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NASA’s NuSTAR satellite discovers new information about Supernova mystery

 

Written by Elizabeth Landau
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA –  “We’re made of star stuff,” astronomer Carl Sagan famously said. Nuclear reactions that happened in ancient stars generated much of the material that makes up our bodies, our planet and our solar system. When stars explode in violent deaths called supernovae, those newly formed elements escape and spread out in the universe.

One supernova in particular is challenging astronomers’ models of how exploding stars distribute their elements. The supernova SN 2014C dramatically changed in appearance over the course of a year, apparently because it had thrown off a lot of material late in its life.

This image from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows spiral galaxy NGC 7331, center, in a three-color X-ray image. Red, green and blue colors are used for low, medium and high-energy X-rays, respectively. An unusual supernova called SN 2014C has been spotted in this galaxy, indicated by the box. (NASA/CXC/CIERA/R.Margutti et al)

This image from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory shows spiral galaxy NGC 7331, center, in a three-color X-ray image. Red, green and blue colors are used for low, medium and high-energy X-rays, respectively. An unusual supernova called SN 2014C has been spotted in this galaxy, indicated by the box. (NASA/CXC/CIERA/R.Margutti et al)

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Tennessee Titans face Denver Broncos Sunday at Nissan Stadium

 

Tennessee Titans (6-6) vs. Denver Broncos (8-4)

Sunday, December 11th, 2016 | Noon CST
Nashville, TN | Nissan Stadium | TV: CBS

Tennessee TitansNashville, TN – This week the Tennessee Titans (6-6) return from their bye week to host the reigning Super Bowl Champion Denver Broncos (8-4). Kickoff at Nissan Stadium (capacity 69,143) is scheduled for noon CST on Sunday, December 11th.

This week’s game will be televised regionally on CBS, including Nashville affiliate WTVF NewsChannel 5. Play-by-play announcer Ian Eagle will call the action alongside analyst Dan Fouts. Evan Washburn will report from the sidelines.

Tennessee Titans running back Derrick Henry (22) runs past Chicago Bears cornerback Tracy Porter (21) during the second quarter at Soldier Field. (Dennis Wierzbicki-USA TODAY Sports)

Tennessee Titans running back Derrick Henry (22) runs past Chicago Bears cornerback Tracy Porter (21) during the second quarter at Soldier Field. (Dennis Wierzbicki-USA TODAY Sports)

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Short episodes of Abnormal Heart Rhythm may not increase Risk of Stroke according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People with pacemakers or defibrillators who experience only short episodes of an abnormal heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation have a very low risk of stroke, suggesting that anticoagulants in this group of patients were not likely to reduce the risk for stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Atrial fibrillation is the most common abnormal heart rhythm, affecting approximately 2.7 million Americans.

People with pacemakers or defibrillators who experience short episodes an abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation have no higher risk for stroke or other medical complications than people without documented atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

People with pacemakers or defibrillators who experience short episodes an abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation have no higher risk for stroke or other medical complications than people without documented atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

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Austin Peay State University’s Phi Alpha Theta wins eighth Best Chapter Award

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – While much of America focused on each word said during the recent first presidential debate, something else was gnawing at the back of the mind of Austin Peay State University professor of history, Dr. Minoa Uffelman.

For the last seven years, the University’s Phi Alpha Theta National Honor Society (PAT), which Uffelman advises, has been recognized each fall with the national Best Chapter Award, but September was drawing to a close without word on a possible eighth consecutive award.

Austin Peay President Dr. Alisa White with the University's Phi Alpha Theta National Honor Society (PAT).

Austin Peay President Dr. Alisa White with the University’s Phi Alpha Theta National Honor Society (PAT).

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American Heart Association report shows nearly half of Hispanics unaware they have High Cholesterol; less than a third treated

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Nearly half of Hispanic adults were unaware they have high cholesterol, and less than a third receive any kind of cholesterol treatment, in a new study in Journal of the American Heart Association.

Hispanics are one of the fastest growing ethnic groups in America, with 52 million among the U.S. population, yet their awareness and management of high cholesterol lags behind other ethnic groups.

High Cholesterol in Hispanics. (American Heart Assocation) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reports Home-based Walking Program eases clogged Leg Arteries

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A home-based exercise program helped people with clogged leg arteries walk farther and faster, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association. The program was beneficial even 12 months after participants started the program.

Previously, studies have shown that supervised exercise can improve walking and lessen the symptoms of peripheral artery disease (PAD), but this is the first to document the long-term benefits of a home-based walking program.

Physicians should recommend walking even if their patients don’t have access to a supervised exercise program. (American Heart Association)

Physicians should recommend walking even if their patients don’t have access to a supervised exercise program. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Healthcare providers should aggressively treat unhealthy lifestyles

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Healthcare providers should treat unhealthy behaviors as aggressively as they treat high blood pressure, cholesterol and other heart disease risk factors, according to an American Heart Association science advisory published in Circulation.

“We’re talking about a paradigm shift from only treating biomarkers — physical indicators of a person’s risk for heart disease — to helping people change unhealthy behaviors, such as smoking, unhealthy body weight, poor diet quality and lack of physical activity,” said Bonnie Spring, Ph.D., lead author of the statement and a professor of preventive medicine and psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University in Chicago. «Read the rest of this article»

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