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Topic: Oak Ridge National Laboratory

APSU graduate Jordan Miller selected for National Science Foundation smart cities program

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – When recent Austin Peay State University (APSU) graduate Jordan Miller starts at Arizona State University this year, she’ll also enter a cutting-edge National Science Foundation-backed smart homes and cities program.

Recent Austin Peay State University computer science graduate Jordan Miller displays her robot in the Technology Building on campus. (APSU)

Recent Austin Peay State University computer science graduate Jordan Miller displays her robot in the Technology Building on campus. (APSU)

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Sections: Education | No Comments
 

Marsha Blackburn Report: This Week From Washington – April 1st, 2019

 

Senator Marsha Blackburn

Tennessee

U.S. SenateWashington, D.C. – Tennessee Tuesday is always my favorite day of the week.

Senator Lamar Alexander and I welcomed another great group of Tennesseans to our nation’s capital for coffee, conversation, and pictures this week.

If you plan to be in the Washington, D.C. area on a Tuesday when the Senate is in session, we would love if you join us for this Tennessee tradition. Constituents attending will have the opportunity to meet and have their picture taken with their senators while enjoying a coffee and pastries. 

Tennessee Tuesday

Tennessee Tuesday

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Sections: Politics | No Comments
 


Austin Peay State University Governor’s School wraps up with day of smashing fun

 

Austin Peay State University

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Before the Austin Peay State University (APSU) Governor’s School for Computational Physics finished its three weeks of summer fun on Friday, the school’s mentors and professors had a little bit more science to show off.

After Bryan Gaither and Jeremiah Simmons boiled water in this steel drum, they sealed it and put it in an ice bath. Within 90 seconds it imploded. (Austin Peay State University)

After Bryan Gaither and Jeremiah Simmons boiled water in this steel drum, they sealed it and put it in an ice bath. Within 90 seconds it imploded. (Austin Peay State University)

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Sections: Education | No Comments
 

Tennessee Legislation seeks to curb Opioid Abuse by Identifying High Risk Prescribers

 

Written by Curtis Johnson
Tennessee State Representative

Tennessee State Representative - District 68Nashville, TN – The House Finance, Ways and Means Subcommittee will consider legislation next week requiring the Tennessee Department of Health (DOH) to identify individuals who are in the top 20 percent of prescribers of opioids in the state.  After being identified and notified of the high volume opioid prescriber status, this legislation requires the prescribers to comply with certain requirements.

The legislation aims to address Tennessee’s status as second in the nation in abuse of opiates.

Under current law, the DOH monitors the 100 highest volume opioid prescribers in Tennessee.  HB 1207  calls for DOH, in addition, to look at prescribers who are at high-risk based on clinical criteria, such as overdoses or dangerous drug combinations.

Tennessee State Representative Curtis Johnson

Tennessee State Representative Curtis Johnson

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Sections: Politics | No Comments
 

U.S. President Donald Trump visits Tennessee

 

Written by Curtis Johnson
Tennessee State Representative

Tennessee State Representative - District 68Nashville, TN – On Wednesday, March 15th, U.S. President Donald Trump arrived in Nashville to honor President Andrew Jackson at his tomb, on his 250th birthday. The President addressed members of the Tennessee General Assembly at the Hermitage before making his way back to Nashville to speak before thousands of supporters.

The Municipal Auditorium was quickly filled to capacity; 30,000 supporters were unable to enter the venue after hours of waiting. The line at the auditorium developed early in the morning, and by the late afternoon, the line stretched the length of James Robertson Parkway, around the Capitol building, and back down Charlotte Street.

People waiting in line at the Municipal Auditorium to see President Donald Trump.

People waiting in line at the Municipal Auditorium to see President Donald Trump.

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U.S. Department of Energy produces fuel to power NASA’s Deep Space Missions

 

Written by Dwayne Brown
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – The first U.S. production in nearly 30 years of a specialized fuel to power future deep space missions has been completed by researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee.

The production of 50 grams of plutonium-238 -roughly the mass of a golf ball – marks the first demonstration in the United States since the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina ceased production in the late 1980s.

This self-portrait of NASA's Mars rover Curiosity combines dozens of exposures taken by the rover's Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) during the 177th Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity's work on Mars (Feb. 3, 2013), plus three exposures taken during Sol 270 (May 10, 2013) to update the appearance of part of the ground beside the rover. (NASA)

This self-portrait of NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity combines dozens of exposures taken by the rover’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) during the 177th Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity’s work on Mars (Feb. 3, 2013), plus three exposures taken during Sol 270 (May 10, 2013) to update the appearance of part of the ground beside the rover. (NASA)

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Sections: Technology | No Comments
 


Tommy Vallejos named Minority Small Business Champion for Tennessee

 

SBA to Honor Top Entrepreneurs during Small Business Week

Tommy Vallejos

Tommy Vallejos

Nashville, TN –Local Pastor and County Commissioner Tommy Vallejos has been selected by the U.S. Small Business Administration as the minority small business Champion for the state of Tennessee for his work while serving as the Director of the Hispanic Organization for Progress & Education (H.O.P.E.).

When reached by telephone Pastor Vallejos said, “Well it’s a great honor to have been selected as the U. S. Small Business Administration’s Minority Small Business Champion, I’ve always considered it important to champion small businesses, minority owned or not. I was selected for this honor due to my involvement and participation in the minority small business sector during my directorship of H.O.P.E.”  «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Business | No Comments
 

APSU’s GIS Center and Oak Ridge Receive $400,000 Grant for Cell Phone App Program

 

Austin Peay State UniversityClarksville, TN – On a stormy Monday afternoon, while tornado sirens blared across the Austin Peay State University campus, Mike Wilson, manager of the school’s Geographic Information Systems Center, decided to talk about natural disasters.

“Suppose a tornado rips through here,” he said, knocking on his wood desk to ward off the suggestion. “If that happens, local officials will need to do a preliminary damage assessment. That’ll go to the state, and the governor will make a decision on whether to call in FEMA for a natural disaster. This app speeds that up.”

Wilson motioned to his Android mobile phone. A year ago, his office, in conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, developed an innovative new cell phone application known as the Disaster Mitigation and Recovery Kit (DMARK). The application allows emergency responders to document immediately any damage they come across following a disaster. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Education | No Comments
 

APSU GIS Center helps develop Damage Assessment application

 

The building, like so many homes and businesses in middle Tennessee, was a pale brown from where the floodwaters covered it. Mike Wilson, manager of Austin Peay State University’s Geographic Information Systems, stood among the tree limbs and other debris in the Woodlawn community and pulled out his cell phone.

He wasn’t making a call. He was filling out a damage assessment of the property and filing it to an electronic server. It took him only a few minutes to complete. For years, the long, drawn-out process of recording the destruction inflicted by a disaster has sometimes taken days or weeks, delaying the time it takes for needed aid to reach an area, but a new cell phone application, developed by the APSU GIS Center and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, may soon allow emergency responders to document immediately any damage they come across. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 



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