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Topic: Obesity

American Heart Association reports Excessive daily TV watching may increase risk of Death

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Watching a lot of television every day may increase your risk of dying from a blood clot in the lung, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

A lung blood clot, known medically as a pulmonary embolism, usually begins as a clot in the leg or pelvis as a result of inactivity and slowed blood flow.

Watching more than 5 hours of TV daily was linked to more than double the risk of death from a blood clot in the lung. (American Heart Association)

Watching more than 5 hours of TV daily was linked to more than double the risk of death from a blood clot in the lung. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Eating more Whole Grains linked with Lower Risk of Death

 

American Heart Association Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Eating at least three servings of whole grains every day could lower your risk of death, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Although dietary guidelines around the world have included whole grains as an essential component of healthy eating patterns, people aren’t eating enough, according to the analysis. In the United States average consumption remains below one serving a day, despite the long-time recommendation of three servings a day.

Eating at least three servings of whole grains a day was associated with lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer and all causes in an analysis of nutrition studies. (American Heart Association)

Eating at least three servings of whole grains a day was associated with lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer and all causes in an analysis of nutrition studies. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Post Coronary Artery Bypass Infections may be linked to severe Obesity

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXCoronary artery bypass patients who have severe obesity are more likely to experience infection shortly after surgery and stay in the hospital longer, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Compared to coronary artery bypass patients with normal weight, patients with severe obesity were three times more likely to develop an infection after bypass surgery, researchers said.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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Smoking may increase kidney disease risk in African-Americans according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXCigarette smoking is considered a universal health hazard, but it may be particularly damaging to kidney function among African-Americans smokers, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Cardiovascular and kidney diseases are closely linked, but few people are aware of the impact of smoking on kidney function,” said Michael Hall, M.D., study lead author and an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Mississippi Medical Center.

Cigarette smoking may be damaging to kidney function in African-Americans.

Cigarette smoking may be damaging to kidney function in African-Americans.

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U.S. Army Health of Force report wake up call for improving readiness

 

Written by David Vergun
Defense Media Activity – Army

U.S. ArmyWashington, D.C. – Obesity and overweight metrics, along with health indicators like tobacco use, injuries, substance abuse and the Performance Triad were among the topics at a conference last week discussing the inaugural “Health of the Force” report.

The HOF report, released at the end of 2015, provides Army leaders, including installation commanders, a starting point regarding where best to invest resources to help Soldiers lead healthier lives, and consequently, improve combat readiness, said Col. Deydre Teyhen, assistant deputy chief of staff, Army Public Health Center.

That report, she said during a media roundtable conducted from the Office of the Army Surgeon General in Falls Church, Virginia, March 16th, is similar to, but much more comprehensive than “The State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America” report, issued by the non-profit Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in 2014.

The Health of the Force report provides Army leaders, including installation commanders, a starting point regarding where best to invest resources to help Soldiers lead healthier lives, and consequently, improve combat readiness, said Col. Deydre Teyhen, assistant deputy chief of staff, Army Public Health Center. (David Vergun, Defense Media Activity - Army)

The Health of the Force report provides Army leaders, including installation commanders, a starting point regarding where best to invest resources to help Soldiers lead healthier lives, and consequently, improve combat readiness, said Col. Deydre Teyhen, assistant deputy chief of staff, Army Public Health Center. (David Vergun, Defense Media Activity – Army)

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American Heart Association says Genetically inherited High Cholesterol twice as common as believed

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Genetically inherited high levels of cholesterol are twice as common in the United States as previously believed, affecting 1 in 250 adults, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

The condition, familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), leads to severely elevated cholesterol levels from birth and is a leading cause of early heart attack.

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says recent Asthma may be linked with Abdominal Aneurysm Rupture

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Patients aged 50 and older with recent asthma activity were significantly more likely than non-asthmatics to experience abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture and sudden death, according to new research published in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, an American Heart Association journal.

The main artery in the body, called the aorta, carries blood to the whole body. When this vessel becomes weakened it can form a balloon-like bulge that may rupture and if left untreated can cause sudden death.

Asthma inhaler. (American Heart Association)

Asthma inhaler. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says a Woman’s Heart Attack Causes, Symptoms may differ from a Man’s

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A woman’s heart attack may have different underlying causes, symptoms and outcomes compared to men, and differences in risk factors and outcomes are further pronounced in black and Hispanic women, according to a scientific statement published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

The statement is the first scientific statement from the American Heart Association on heart attacks in women.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association Comments on Sugary Drink Taxes in Mexico

 

The American Heart Association comments on first-year evaluation of implementation of Mexico’s sugar-sweetened beverage tax in 2014.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In 2014, Mexico implemented a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages as a step toward reversing the twin epidemics of diabetes and obesity.

A study examining the first-year impact on beverage volume sales in Mexico after tax implementation shows that a tax of one peso per liter decreased the volume of sugary drinks purchased by a significant amount (6% monthly average), while also increasing the volume of healthier drinks purchased (4% monthly average), specifically bottled water.

Sugar-sweetened drinks associated with heart disease and other chronic diseases such as obesity and diabetes.

Sugar-sweetened drinks associated with heart disease and other chronic diseases such as obesity and diabetes.

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Tennessee Governor’s Foundation Launches “Small Starts for Families”

 

Free, online wellness tool provides help to parents and caregivers of young children

Governor’s Foundation for Health and WellnessNashville, TN – The Governor’s Foundation for Health and Wellness, through its Healthier Tennessee initiative, today launched Small Starts for Families™, a free, online wellness tool to help parents and caregivers of children from birth to early childhood create healthier lives for the ones they love.

The Small Starts for Families tool presents simple actions families can do each day to live healthier.

Eat Healthy.

Eat Healthy.

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