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Topic: Obesity

Austin Peay State University Nursing Faculty presents at International Conference in South Africa

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Three Austin Peay State University School of Nursing professors traveled to South Africa earlier this summer to speak about their research at the 27th Sigma Theta Tau International Research Congress.

The congress, with more than 800 nurse researchers from 33 different countries, is the largest nursing research event in the world.

(L to R) Dr. Amy Hamlin, Dr. Shondell Hickson and Dr. Patty Orr.

(L to R) Dr. Amy Hamlin, Dr. Shondell Hickson and Dr. Patty Orr.

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Children should eat less than 25 grams of added Sugars daily according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children ages 2 to 18 should eat or drink less than six teaspoons of added sugars daily, according to the scientific statement recommending a specific limit on added sugars for children, published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Six teaspoons of added sugars is equivalent to about 100 calories or 25 grams.

“Our target recommendation is the same for all children between the ages of 2 and 18 to keep it simple for parents and public health advocates,” said Miriam Vos, M.D., Ms.P.H, lead author, nutrition scientist and associate professor of pediatrics at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia.

Healthy kids are sweet enough. Kids age 2-18 should have less than 25 grams or six teaspoons of added sugar daily for a healthy heart. (American Heart Association)

Healthy kids are sweet enough. Kids age 2-18 should have less than 25 grams or six teaspoons of added sugar daily for a healthy heart. (American Heart Association)

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Gallstone Disease may increase Heart Disease Risk reports American Heart Association

 

Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A history of gallstone disease may increase your risk of coronary heart disease, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology.

Gallstone disease is one of the most common and costly gastrointestinal disorders in the United States. Gallstone disease and coronary heart disease have similar risk factors, including diabetes, obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and poor diet.

A history of gallstone disease was linked to a 23 percent increased risk of developing coronary heart disease. (American Heart Association)

A history of gallstone disease was linked to a 23 percent increased risk of developing coronary heart disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Children Score Low on Cardiovascular Health Measures

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Proactive strategies for promoting good heart health should begin at birth, yet most American children do not meet the American Heart Association’s definition of ideal childhood cardiovascular health, according to a new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

“Instead of taking a wait-and-see approach by treating disease later in adulthood, we should help children maintain the standards of ideal cardiovascular health that most children are born with,” said Julia Steinberger, M.D., M.S., lead author of the new statement, professor in pediatrics and director of pediatric cardiology at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

Most children are born with ideal cardiovascular health and promoting good heart health should begin at birth. (American Heart Association)

Most children are born with ideal cardiovascular health and promoting good heart health should begin at birth. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association New Initiative aims to reduce repeat Heart Attacks

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Every 42 seconds someone in the U.S. has a heart attack. Just after noon on March 26th, 2016, Julie Kubala, become one of those statistics.

She’s working now to ensure she doesn’t become a different one – about 21 percent of women and 17 percent of men age 45 and older will have another heart attack within five years of their first one.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Excessive daily TV watching may increase risk of Death

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Watching a lot of television every day may increase your risk of dying from a blood clot in the lung, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

A lung blood clot, known medically as a pulmonary embolism, usually begins as a clot in the leg or pelvis as a result of inactivity and slowed blood flow.

Watching more than 5 hours of TV daily was linked to more than double the risk of death from a blood clot in the lung. (American Heart Association)

Watching more than 5 hours of TV daily was linked to more than double the risk of death from a blood clot in the lung. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Eating more Whole Grains linked with Lower Risk of Death

 

American Heart Association Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Eating at least three servings of whole grains every day could lower your risk of death, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Although dietary guidelines around the world have included whole grains as an essential component of healthy eating patterns, people aren’t eating enough, according to the analysis. In the United States average consumption remains below one serving a day, despite the long-time recommendation of three servings a day.

Eating at least three servings of whole grains a day was associated with lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer and all causes in an analysis of nutrition studies. (American Heart Association)

Eating at least three servings of whole grains a day was associated with lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer and all causes in an analysis of nutrition studies. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Post Coronary Artery Bypass Infections may be linked to severe Obesity

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXCoronary artery bypass patients who have severe obesity are more likely to experience infection shortly after surgery and stay in the hospital longer, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Compared to coronary artery bypass patients with normal weight, patients with severe obesity were three times more likely to develop an infection after bypass surgery, researchers said.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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Smoking may increase kidney disease risk in African-Americans according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXCigarette smoking is considered a universal health hazard, but it may be particularly damaging to kidney function among African-Americans smokers, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Cardiovascular and kidney diseases are closely linked, but few people are aware of the impact of smoking on kidney function,” said Michael Hall, M.D., study lead author and an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Mississippi Medical Center.

Cigarette smoking may be damaging to kidney function in African-Americans.

Cigarette smoking may be damaging to kidney function in African-Americans.

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U.S. Army Health of Force report wake up call for improving readiness

 

Written by David Vergun
Defense Media Activity – Army

U.S. ArmyWashington, D.C. – Obesity and overweight metrics, along with health indicators like tobacco use, injuries, substance abuse and the Performance Triad were among the topics at a conference last week discussing the inaugural “Health of the Force” report.

The HOF report, released at the end of 2015, provides Army leaders, including installation commanders, a starting point regarding where best to invest resources to help Soldiers lead healthier lives, and consequently, improve combat readiness, said Col. Deydre Teyhen, assistant deputy chief of staff, Army Public Health Center.

That report, she said during a media roundtable conducted from the Office of the Army Surgeon General in Falls Church, Virginia, March 16th, is similar to, but much more comprehensive than “The State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America” report, issued by the non-profit Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in 2014.

The Health of the Force report provides Army leaders, including installation commanders, a starting point regarding where best to invest resources to help Soldiers lead healthier lives, and consequently, improve combat readiness, said Col. Deydre Teyhen, assistant deputy chief of staff, Army Public Health Center. (David Vergun, Defense Media Activity - Army)

The Health of the Force report provides Army leaders, including installation commanders, a starting point regarding where best to invest resources to help Soldiers lead healthier lives, and consequently, improve combat readiness, said Col. Deydre Teyhen, assistant deputy chief of staff, Army Public Health Center. (David Vergun, Defense Media Activity – Army)

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