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Topic: Obesity

Sleep disorders may influence heart disease risk factors says American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Sleep problems including sleeping too little or too long, may be linked to a variety of factors that may raise the risk for cardiovascular diseases, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

The first statement by the American Heart Association on sleep and heart health outlines what we currently know about sleep irregularities and cardiovascular-related risk factors, including obesity, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and atherosclerosis, arrhythmias, high blood pressure, stroke, unhealthy levels of triglycerides and cholesterol.

Research linking sleep problems to obesity and diabetes is robust, but longer studies measuring impact on actual weight are needed. (American Heart Association)

Research linking sleep problems to obesity and diabetes is robust, but longer studies measuring impact on actual weight are needed. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Kids need to be Protected from toxic Secondhand Smoke

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Parents and policy advocates should take a “zero tolerance” approach to exposing children to secondhand cigarette smoke, which can be responsible for lifelong cardiovascular consequences in addition to respiratory and other health issues, according to a new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

American Heart Association says Kids need to be Protected from toxic Secondhand Smoke. (American Heart Association)

American Heart Association says Kids need to be Protected from toxic Secondhand Smoke. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Exercise can help keep Medical Costs Down

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Getting recommended levels of exercise weekly may help keep down annual medical costs both for people with and without cardiovascular disease, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Although it’s well known that regular moderate exercise reduces risk of heart disease, stroke, and chronic conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure, “our findings also emphasize the favorable impact on how much you pay for healthcare,” said Khurram Nasir, M.D., M.P.H., senior author of the study and director of the Center for Healthcare Advancement & Outcomes and the High Risk Cardiovascular Disease Clinic at Baptist Health South Florida in Coral Gables.

Patients with heart disease who met weekly guidelines for moderate to vigorous exercise saved on average more than $2,500 in annual healthcare costs. (American Heart Association)

Patients with heart disease who met weekly guidelines for moderate to vigorous exercise saved on average more than $2,500 in annual healthcare costs. (American Heart Association)

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Younger heart attack survivors may face premature heart disease death according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For patients age 50 and younger, the risk of premature death after a heart attack has dropped significantly, but their risk is still almost twice as high when compared to the general population, largely due to heart disease and other smoking-related diseases, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health encourages Breastfeeding to help Improve Health of Mothers and Babies

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – The Tennessee Department of Health recognizes breastfeeding as an important way to help babies get off to a healthy start. Breastfeeding is a key to Sustainable development.

’Community support for breastfeeding is essential to help more mothers make the important and healthy choice to breastfeed,’’ said TDH Commissioner John Dreyzehner, MD, MPH. ‘’We applaud the many businesses in Tennessee who have already made the commitment to create an environment that encourages mothers to breastfeed.’’

Mothers are encouraged to breastfeed their babies to help get them off to healthy start.

Mothers are encouraged to breastfeed their babies to help get them off to healthy start.

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Austin Peay State University Nursing Faculty presents at International Conference in South Africa

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Three Austin Peay State University School of Nursing professors traveled to South Africa earlier this summer to speak about their research at the 27th Sigma Theta Tau International Research Congress.

The congress, with more than 800 nurse researchers from 33 different countries, is the largest nursing research event in the world.

(L to R) Dr. Amy Hamlin, Dr. Shondell Hickson and Dr. Patty Orr.

(L to R) Dr. Amy Hamlin, Dr. Shondell Hickson and Dr. Patty Orr.

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Children should eat less than 25 grams of added Sugars daily according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children ages 2 to 18 should eat or drink less than six teaspoons of added sugars daily, according to the scientific statement recommending a specific limit on added sugars for children, published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Six teaspoons of added sugars is equivalent to about 100 calories or 25 grams.

“Our target recommendation is the same for all children between the ages of 2 and 18 to keep it simple for parents and public health advocates,” said Miriam Vos, M.D., Ms.P.H, lead author, nutrition scientist and associate professor of pediatrics at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia.

Healthy kids are sweet enough. Kids age 2-18 should have less than 25 grams or six teaspoons of added sugar daily for a healthy heart. (American Heart Association)

Healthy kids are sweet enough. Kids age 2-18 should have less than 25 grams or six teaspoons of added sugar daily for a healthy heart. (American Heart Association)

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Gallstone Disease may increase Heart Disease Risk reports American Heart Association

 

Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A history of gallstone disease may increase your risk of coronary heart disease, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology.

Gallstone disease is one of the most common and costly gastrointestinal disorders in the United States. Gallstone disease and coronary heart disease have similar risk factors, including diabetes, obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and poor diet.

A history of gallstone disease was linked to a 23 percent increased risk of developing coronary heart disease. (American Heart Association)

A history of gallstone disease was linked to a 23 percent increased risk of developing coronary heart disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Children Score Low on Cardiovascular Health Measures

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Proactive strategies for promoting good heart health should begin at birth, yet most American children do not meet the American Heart Association’s definition of ideal childhood cardiovascular health, according to a new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

“Instead of taking a wait-and-see approach by treating disease later in adulthood, we should help children maintain the standards of ideal cardiovascular health that most children are born with,” said Julia Steinberger, M.D., M.S., lead author of the new statement, professor in pediatrics and director of pediatric cardiology at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

Most children are born with ideal cardiovascular health and promoting good heart health should begin at birth. (American Heart Association)

Most children are born with ideal cardiovascular health and promoting good heart health should begin at birth. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association New Initiative aims to reduce repeat Heart Attacks

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Every 42 seconds someone in the U.S. has a heart attack. Just after noon on March 26th, 2016, Julie Kubala, become one of those statistics.

She’s working now to ensure she doesn’t become a different one – about 21 percent of women and 17 percent of men age 45 and older will have another heart attack within five years of their first one.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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