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Topic: Physical Activity

American Heart Association reports Social and Practical Barriers keep Heart Failure Patients from benefits of Exercise Therapy

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Although supervised aerobic physical activity is a proven therapy for heart failure patients, lack of social support and practical barriers such as lack of transportation, keep many patients from benefitting from cardiac rehab programs, according to new research in Circulation: Heart Failure, an American Heart Association journal.

Yoga

Yoga

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American Heart Association reports Physical activity: more is better for Heart Failure Prevention

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Doubling or quadrupling the minimum federally recommended levels of physical activity lowered the risk of developing heart failure by 20 percent and 35 percent, respectively, according to research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Walking 30 minutes a day as recommended in the U.S. physical activity guidelines, may not be good enough — significantly more physical activity may be necessary to reduce the risk of heart failure” said Jarett D. Berry, M.D., senior author of the study and an associate professor of internal medicine and clinical sciences at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, Texas.

A review of 12 large studies found when exercise and physical activity was doubled or quadrupled heart failure risk was reduced by about 20 to 35 percent, respectively. (American Heart Association)

A review of 12 large studies found when exercise and physical activity was doubled or quadrupled heart failure risk was reduced by about 20 to 35 percent, respectively. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says pedometer step count better than physical activity self-reports for predicting weight loss

 

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – Using a pedometer to count steps is an easy and accessible way to accurately measure physical activity and may be a better predictor of weight loss than self-reported physical activity, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association EPI/Lifestyle 2015 meeting.

Researchers compared the associations between self-reported physical activity, pedometer step count measurements and weight loss to determine if pedometers might offer a better way to measure some aspects of physical activity.

Pedometer. (American Heart Association)

Pedometer. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Older Adults with limited mobility may lessen Heart Problems with Activity

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Older adults with limited mobility may lower their risk of heart attack and coronary death for every minute of physical activity, according to research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Reducing time spent being sedentary even by engaging in low-intensity activities could have important cardiovascular benefits for older adults with mobility limitations,” said Thomas W. Buford, Ph.D., senior author of the study and director of the Health Promotion Center of the University of Florida Institute on Aging in Gainesville, Florida.

Regular daily walking reduced the risk of stroke, regardless of the pace or distance. (American Heart Association)

Regular daily walking reduced the risk of stroke, regardless of the pace or distance. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association and American Stroke Association – Life is Why

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For the first time in the 50 years that the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association has released an annual snapshot of heart disease and stroke statistics in the U.S., the new report adds a global view.

Health data compiled from more than 190 countries show heart disease remains the No. 1 global cause of death with 17.3 million deaths each year, according to “Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics — 2015 Update: A Report From the American Heart Association.” That number is expected to rise to more than 23.6 million by 2030, the report found.

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Healthcare Providers encouraged to aggressively treat unhealthy lifestyles

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Healthcare providers should treat unhealthy behaviors as aggressively as they treat high blood pressure, cholesterol and other heart disease risk factors, according to an American Heart Association science advisory published in Circulation.

“We’re talking about a paradigm shift from only treating biomarkers — physical indicators of a person’s risk for heart disease — to helping people change unhealthy behaviors, such as smoking, unhealthy body weight, poor diet quality and lack of physical activity,” said Bonnie Spring, Ph.D., lead author of the statement and a professor of preventive medicine and psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University in Chicago.

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American Heart Association says People with Congenital Heart Disease need Physical Activity

 

Some irregular heart beat conditions may require activity restrictions but for most patients physical activity is unlimited.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new scientific statement from the American Heart Association reminds physicians and people with congenital heart disease that regular physical activity is still important and should be promoted.

Congenital heart disease (heart structural problems existing since birth) is estimated to affect more than 859,000 children and 850,000 adults in the United States.

People born with a heart defect need physical activity. (American Heart Association)

People born with a heart defect need physical activity. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says adolescents’ poor health behaviors raise risk of heart disease as adults

 

More than 80 percent of them had a poor diet and many were not physically active.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – U.S. adolescents’ high levels of poor health behaviors and unfavorable cardiovascular risk factors may increase their chances of heart disease as adults, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Researchers estimated the current state of cardiovascular health of U.S. adolescents based on the seven cardiovascular health components defined in the American Heart Association’s 2020 impact goals, which include both health behaviors and factors: blood pressure, total cholesterol, body mass index (BMI), blood glucose, healthy diet, physical activity and smoking. The 4,673 adolescents were 12-to 19-years-old and represented about 33.2 million adolescents nationally.

Poor diet in adolescents can raise risk of heart disease later in life. (American Heart Association)

Poor diet in adolescents can raise risk of heart disease later in life. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health suggests Top Five Resolutions for Tennesseans

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – With New Year’s Eve fast approaching, conversations have already started about resolutions for 2013. Losing weight and stopping smoking are perpetual favorites for many, and the Tennessee Department of Health believes those are excellent goals and includes them in a list of five suggested resolutions for the upcoming year. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reports regular physical activity reduces risk of dementia in older people

 

Thirty minutes of physical activity three times a week had a significant impact on brain health.

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Regular physical activity may help older people reduce their chances of getting dementia.

In a new study published in the American Heart Association journal Stroke, older, non-disabled people who regularly engaged in physical activity reduced their risk of vascular-related dementia by 40 percent and cognitive impairment of any etiology by 60 percent.

The protective effect of regular physical activity remained regardless of age, education, changes in the brain’s white matter and even previous history of stroke or diabetes, researchers said. «Read the rest of this article»

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