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Topic: Physical Activity

American Heart Association says Golden Years are longer and healthier for those with Good Heart Health in Middle Age

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People with no major heart disease risk factors in middle age live longer and stay healthy far longer than others, according to a 40-year study reported in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Good cardiovascular health in middle age delays the onset of many types of disease so that people live longer and spend a much smaller proportion of their lives with chronic illness,” said Norrina Allen, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

A Healthy Heart in Middle Age Could Add Almost Four Years to Your Life After Age 65 and Save You $18,000 in Medicare Care Costs. Graphic shows these benefits for middle aged adults who don't smoke or have diabetes, maintain a normal weight, have good blood pressure and good cholesterol. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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Clarksville applauded by Governor Bill Haslam as Healthier Tennessee Community

 

City leads community wide effort to improve health, fitness

City of Clarksville - Clarksville, TNClarksville, TN – Clarksville Mayor Kim McMillan and members of Healthy Clarksville were applauded Tuesday morning by Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam for making Clarksville a Healthier Tennessee Community.

The Governor’s Foundation for Health and Wellness hosted a breakfast and awards ceremony at Waller Law in Nashville to honor Clarksville and eight other communities that have earned the designation.

Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam presents a plaque to Clarkville Mayor Kim McMillan and members of the Mayor’s Fitness Council/Healthy Clarksville designating Clarksville as a Healthier Tennessee Community.

Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam presents a plaque to Clarkville Mayor Kim McMillan and members of the Mayor’s Fitness Council/Healthy Clarksville designating Clarksville as a Healthier Tennessee Community.

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Frazier Allen: You Are What You Think

 

F&M Investment Services - Raymond James - Clarksville, TNClarksville, TN – Research shows that 90% of your happiness is determined by your mindset, meaning only 10% is affected by external factors – be that your job, finances or health. It might be hard to believe, but happiness and contentment have as much to do with how you perceive life as anything else.

Whether it’s aging, an approaching lifestyle change as retirement nears, or a general waning of zest for life, there’s a wealth of research and ideas that suggest a more optimistic outlook is within your reach.

An optimistic outlook can enhance your health, your work and your daily life.

An optimistic outlook can enhance your health, your work and your daily life.

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American Heart Association says Older Adults with Heart Disease can become more independent and Heart Healthy with Physical Activity

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Improving physical activity among older adults with heart disease benefits their heart health, independence and quality of life, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Physical activity helps reduce heart disease symptoms for patients with heart failure, heart attacks and stroke, and it also helps to improve the age-related erosions of strength, balance, and reduces frailty that particularly affect older heart patients.

Healthcare providers should emphasize cardiac rehabilitation when appropriate and provide individualized guidance on increasing daily physical activities for older patients with heart disease. (American Heart Association)

Healthcare providers should emphasize cardiac rehabilitation when appropriate and provide individualized guidance on increasing daily physical activities for older patients with heart disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Playing Pokémon Go may help people reach 10,000 daily steps goal

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPortland, OR – Playing the popular smartphone game Pokémon Go may increase people’s daily steps, especially among young adults with low physical activity levels or those who are overweight or obese, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention / Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2017 Scientific Sessions.

In Pokémon Go, a location-based augmented reality game, players move around a physical location capturing animated creatures on smartphones and other mobile devices. Pokémon Go has generated a great deal of interest since it was released in July 2016, but few studies have examined whether playing the game can increase an individual’s level of physical activity.

When guided by internet programs or mobile devices, people can become more physically active, eat better, lose a little weight and reduce tobacco and alcohol use. (American Heart Association)

When guided by internet programs or mobile devices, people can become more physically active, eat better, lose a little weight and reduce tobacco and alcohol use. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Seven Heart-Healthy Habits could save billions in Medicare costs

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – More than $41 billion a year in Medicare costs could be saved if all beneficiaries achieved ideal levels for five to seven heart-healthy habits to reduce cardiovascular risk, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. 

At least $41 billion annually in Medicare costs could be saved if beneficiaries adopted five to seven of the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 healthy habits to reduce cardiovascular disease.

At least $41 billion annually in Medicare costs could be saved if beneficiaries adopted five to seven of the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 healthy habits to reduce cardiovascular disease.

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American Heart Association says Regular exercise may reduce High Blood Pressure risk in African Americans

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Regular swimming, biking or even brisk walks can help African Americans lower their chance of developing high blood pressure, according to new research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

“High blood pressure is a major health issue for many African Americans,” said Keith Diaz, Ph.D., lead study author and assistant professor at the Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health at Colombia University Medical Center in New York, New York.

Man checking blood pressure at office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

Man checking blood pressure at office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Internet and Mobile Devices prompt positive lifestyle changes

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People are more likely to adopt heart healthy behaviors when guided and encouraged via the Internet, their cellphones or other devices, according to 23 years of research reviewed in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

When guided by internet programs or mobile devices, people can become more physically active, eat better, lose a little weight and reduce tobacco and alcohol use. (American Heart Association)

When guided by internet programs or mobile devices, people can become more physically active, eat better, lose a little weight and reduce tobacco and alcohol use. (American Heart Association)

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Sedentary time may raise Heart Disease Risk – Sit Less, Move More says American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Being sedentary is not just a lack of exercise, it is a potentially independent risk factor for heart disease and stroke, according to a science advisory from the American Heart Association.

“Regardless of how much physical activity someone gets, prolonged sedentary time could negatively impact the health of your heart and blood vessels,” said Deborah Rohm Young, Ph.D., director of behavioral research at Kaiser Permanente Southern California in Pasadena and chair of the new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Sedentary time — even among physically active people — may be associated with an increased risk of heart disease, diabetes and more. (American Heart Association)

Sedentary time — even among physically active people — may be associated with an increased risk of heart disease, diabetes and more. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Children Score Low on Cardiovascular Health Measures

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Proactive strategies for promoting good heart health should begin at birth, yet most American children do not meet the American Heart Association’s definition of ideal childhood cardiovascular health, according to a new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

“Instead of taking a wait-and-see approach by treating disease later in adulthood, we should help children maintain the standards of ideal cardiovascular health that most children are born with,” said Julia Steinberger, M.D., M.S., lead author of the new statement, professor in pediatrics and director of pediatric cardiology at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

Most children are born with ideal cardiovascular health and promoting good heart health should begin at birth. (American Heart Association)

Most children are born with ideal cardiovascular health and promoting good heart health should begin at birth. (American Heart Association)

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