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Topic: San Francisco CA

Vice Chief of the Army General John F. Campbell nominated as new ISAF commander

 

Written by Libby Howe
United States Army

U.S. ArmyWashington, D.C. – Vice Chief of Staff of the Army General John F. Campbell received a presidential nomination to serve as commander of NATO’s International Security Assistance Force and U.S. Forces Afghanistan.

“I am truly honored and humbled by the president’s nomination for me to serve as the next International Security Assistance Force commander,” Campbell said.

“If confirmed, I look forward to serving alongside our Afghan and coalition partners as we continue operations in Afghanistan. Until such time, I remain committed to my current responsibilities as the vice chief of staff of the Army,” he said.

Vice Chief of Staff of the Army General John F. Campbell received a presidential nomination to serve as NATO's International Security Assistance Force and U.S. Forces Afghanistan Commander. (U.S. Army)

Vice Chief of Staff of the Army General John F. Campbell received a presidential nomination to serve as NATO’s International Security Assistance Force and U.S. Forces Afghanistan Commander. (U.S. Army)

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NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory uses new Radar Instrument to montior Levees in California

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – One morning in 2008, research scientist Cathleen Jones of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA, was flying over the San Andreas fault near San Francisco, testing a new radar instrument built at JPL.

As the plane banked to make a turn, she looked down to see the Sacramento River delta, a patchwork of low-lying lands crisscrossed by levees.

Jones was using an instrument that can measure tiny movements of the ground on the scale of less than half an inch (less than a centimeter). It’s called the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR).

This 2004 levee break, caused by a burrowing beaver, did $90 million worth of damage. NASA's UAVSAR is monitoring levees for early signs of stress that could lead to failure. (Calif. DWR)

This 2004 levee break, caused by a burrowing beaver, did $90 million worth of damage. NASA’s UAVSAR is monitoring levees for early signs of stress that could lead to failure. (Calif. DWR)

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American Heart Association says combo of overweight, high sodium intake speeds cell aging in teens

 

American Heart AssociationSan Francisco, CA – Overweight or obese teenagers who eat lots of salty foods may show signs of faster cell aging, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology & Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity & Metabolism Scientific Sessions 2014.

“Lowering sodium intake, especially if you are overweight or obese, may slow down the cellular aging process that plays an important role in the development of heart disease,” said Haidong Zhu, M.D., Ph.D., lead author of the study and assistant professor of pediatrics at Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University in Augusta, GA.

Combo of overweight, high sodium intake speeds cell aging in teens
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American Heart Association says U.S. Women unfamiliar with most stroke warning signs

 

American Heart AssociationSan Francisco, CA – Many U.S. women don’t know most of the warning signs of a stroke, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism 2014 Scientific Sessions.

The study is also published in the American Heart Association journal, Stroke. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says ruling with an iron fist could make your child pack on pounds

 

American Heart AssociationSan Francisco, CA – If you’re rigid with rules and skimpy on affection and dialogue with your kids, they have a greater chance of being obese, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology & Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity & Metabolism Scientific Sessions 2014.

Researchers followed a nationally representative group of 37,577 Canadian children aged 0 to 11. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Program taught in American Sign Language helps deaf achieve healthier weight

 

American Heart AssociationSan Francisco, CA – A group of deaf adults using American Sign Language in a healthy lifestyle program successfully lost weight, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology & Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity & Metabolism Scientific Sessions 2014.

In the first randomized trial of lifestyle modification or weight reduction with deaf people using American Sign Language (ASL), participants had moderate improvements in their weight and level of physical activity after a 16-week program.

Program taught in American Sign Language helps deaf achieve healthier weight

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American Heart Association reports spices and herbs intervention helps adults reduce salt intake

 

American Heart AssociationSan Francisco, CA – Teaching people how to flavor food with spices and herbs is considerably more effective at lowering salt intake than having them do it on their own, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology & Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity & Metabolism Scientific Sessions 2014.

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

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Force Activity-Tracking Wristband recalled by Fitbit Due to Risk of Skin Irritation

 

U.S. Consumer Product Safety CommissionWashington, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) reports Fitbit recalls Force Activity-Tracking Wristband. Users of the product can develop an allergic reaction to the casing causing skin irritation.

Consumers should stop using this product unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product.

Fitbit Force Activity-Tracking Wristband recalled.

Fitbit Force Activity-Tracking Wristband recalled.

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NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows seasonally changing surface near Mar’s equator

 

Written by Guy Webster
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has revealed to scientists slender dark markings — possibly due to salty water – that advance seasonally down slopes surprisingly close to the Martian equator.

“The equatorial surface region of Mars has been regarded as dry, free of liquid or frozen water, but we may need to rethink that,” said Alfred McEwen of the University of Arizona in Tucson, principal investigator for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera.

This image from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows how the appearance of dark markings on Martian slope changes with the seasons. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona)

This image from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows how the appearance of dark markings on Martian slope changes with the seasons. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona)

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NASA’s Galileo spacecraft discovers Clay Like Minerals on Jupiter’s Moon Europa

 

Written by Jia-Rui C. Cook
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – A new analysis of data from NASA’s Galileo mission has revealed clay-type minerals at the surface of Jupiter’s icy moon Europa that appear to have been delivered by a spectacular collision with an asteroid or comet.

This is the first time such minerals have been detected on Europa’s surface. The types of space rocks that deliver such minerals typically also often carry organic materials.

This image, using data from NASA's Galileo mission, shows the first detection of clay-like minerals on the surface of Jupiter's moon Europa. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI)

This image, using data from NASA’s Galileo mission, shows the first detection of clay-like minerals on the surface of Jupiter’s moon Europa. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI)

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